Reply by G. Kramer Herzog August 15, 20052005-08-15
Interesting, the BX-01s 64k addesses are a bit over the top. 64 is
an ample amount for most robotic control projects [how many legs do
you really need?]

The BX-01 is a bit of a wimp when it comes to sink or source.

You seem to be providing the missing 'driver' for all those I/O
addresses.

Since it only uses 4 I/O pins, I assume that it may be RAMsandwich
compatible. Does anyone know?

--- In basicx@basi..., "wurlitzer28" <craig.whitley@a...>
wrote:
> For anyone on this BB requiring extended I/O, I have built for
> multiple projects, a board that only requires 4 I/O (min) from the
> BasicX (or other micro) and can create almost unlimited I/O in 64
bit
> increments. Each board can be configured as 64 Inputs, 64 Outputs,
or
> could be split 32in/32out.
>
> My latest project has 96 inputs and 512 outputs. The outputs can
sink
> 150 ma (max 3W/ IC). Using the BasicX-24 I can scan the 96 inputs
> in .01 seconds.
>
> If you find yourself in need of a bunch of I/O let me know and I
can
> give you more details.
>
> Craig > --- In basicx@basi..., "G. Kramer Herzog" <hwanghetw@y...>
> wrote:
> > I don't have a web page, so this is the only place that you will
> see
> > and information.
> >
> > The RAMsandwich is a bit more than RAM. It is an LCD interface,
> has
> > 4 buttons, and input to/from 128k of RAM in two pages. Ther
first
> > page is merely called RAM and the second page is called XRAM for
> > extended RAM. The RAM module is connect through a tri-state
buffer
> > that serves to 8 bits of parallel data with 8 of the 16bits of
RAM
> > address. This occurs when the RAM is properly enabled. In a
> second
> > mode the 8 bits of data are provided to the LCD for i/o and
control
> > of its functions. I am not sure if the 4 buttons are
concurrently
> > usable as I don't have the schematic right in front of me.
> >
> > The main point here is that data and address are prepared for a
> > multiplex arrangement in the BX-01. The processor alternately
> > sends/receives addresses and data.
> >
> > This arrangement ties up 16 of the 40 pins for RAM data and
address
> > and a few other pins for ChipSelect and PageSelect functions.
> > Thusly, the RAM chip mode restricts the number of pins available
> for
> > other i/o more than any other mode. Still you have at least one
COM
> > port on board to use for either RS-232 or RS-485 or TTL serial
> > between the processor and another device. The great advantage
lies
> > in that you have 128K of RAM for a data logger or data buffer or
> > both. This allows fairly longterm data collection or high speed
> > throughput of data.
> >
> > It should be noted that the BX-01 is quite unlike the BX-24 and
BX-
> 35
> > as the two main functions significantly change the number of pins
> > available and the way you use the device. I fondly thing of them
> as
> > Dr. Jekel and Mr. Hyde. [which is which is up to you]
> >
> >
> > In RS-485 NETWORK mode, you need to communication with ONLY other
> BX-
> > 01s on the network as the firmward within the BX-01 is
identifying
> a
> > particular node address and then actually reading or modifying
data
> > at particular locations withing the other processor. It is a
quite
> > beautiful and powerful scheme.
> >
> > Imagine if you had a 50 floor building and you wanted a
> > microprocessor on each floor to tell you if doors were open and
> > closed. It is really not a problem. In Network mode you have 22
> i/0
> > pin available to keep track of 22 doors [or if you have more
doors,
> > you can encode binary logic for 2 to the 22 power].
> >
> > All you need is call up a floor [call a microprocessor] and read
a
> > few bytes to get a complete report.
> >
> > The RS-485 network is far superior to RS-232 for cost, for
> distance,
> > for noise rejection, and simplicity. It allows peer-to-peer as
> well
> > as master-slave. It can be used in a one line arrangement, a
star,
> > or other arrangements with repeaters and hubs that are available.
> >
> > The gist of this is that you can create a large dedicated network
> > that doesn't require the purchase of a LAN and a PC at each
> station.
> > In many situations all that hardware not only is a waste of
money,
> > but a risk for damage or theft as it is left unattended.
> >
> > This is great stuff with lots of applications and cost savings!!!
> >
> > --- In basicx@basi..., "G. Kramer Herzog"
<hwanghetw@y...>
> > wrote:
> > > I have the BX-01, a RAMsandwich, a LCD, and the BasicX
> Development
> > > Station.
> > >
> > > I have struggled with getting it into use, but finally feel
> > confident
> > > about moving ahead.
> > >
> > > I see questions and comments about thing. For example, 'Why
does
> > pin
> > > #3 have to be High? [it is part of the arbitration between the
> Ram
> > and
> > > the LCD enable.
> > >
> > > My goal is to get all of it working and I would be happy to
share
> > my
> > > information and test programs as NetMedia seems to have been
too
> > busy
> > > with other products to really support this one.
> > >
> > > Also, I just figured out a way to use two processors on the
> > development
> > > board concurrently. This may perk more interest in using the
BX-
> 01
> > and
> > > the RAM sandwich to create a hefty system.
> > >
> > > G.K. Herzog - Taiwan


Reply by wurlitzer28 August 15, 20052005-08-15
For anyone on this BB requiring extended I/O, I have built for
multiple projects, a board that only requires 4 I/O (min) from the
BasicX (or other micro) and can create almost unlimited I/O in 64 bit
increments. Each board can be configured as 64 Inputs, 64 Outputs, or
could be split 32in/32out.

My latest project has 96 inputs and 512 outputs. The outputs can sink
150 ma (max 3W/ IC). Using the BasicX-24 I can scan the 96 inputs
in .01 seconds.

If you find yourself in need of a bunch of I/O let me know and I can
give you more details.

Craig --- In basicx@basi..., "G. Kramer Herzog" <hwanghetw@y...>
wrote:
> I don't have a web page, so this is the only place that you will
see
> and information.
>
> The RAMsandwich is a bit more than RAM. It is an LCD interface,
has
> 4 buttons, and input to/from 128k of RAM in two pages. Ther first
> page is merely called RAM and the second page is called XRAM for
> extended RAM. The RAM module is connect through a tri-state buffer
> that serves to 8 bits of parallel data with 8 of the 16bits of RAM
> address. This occurs when the RAM is properly enabled. In a
second
> mode the 8 bits of data are provided to the LCD for i/o and control
> of its functions. I am not sure if the 4 buttons are concurrently
> usable as I don't have the schematic right in front of me.
>
> The main point here is that data and address are prepared for a
> multiplex arrangement in the BX-01. The processor alternately
> sends/receives addresses and data.
>
> This arrangement ties up 16 of the 40 pins for RAM data and address
> and a few other pins for ChipSelect and PageSelect functions.
> Thusly, the RAM chip mode restricts the number of pins available
for
> other i/o more than any other mode. Still you have at least one COM
> port on board to use for either RS-232 or RS-485 or TTL serial
> between the processor and another device. The great advantage lies
> in that you have 128K of RAM for a data logger or data buffer or
> both. This allows fairly longterm data collection or high speed
> throughput of data.
>
> It should be noted that the BX-01 is quite unlike the BX-24 and BX-
35
> as the two main functions significantly change the number of pins
> available and the way you use the device. I fondly thing of them
as
> Dr. Jekel and Mr. Hyde. [which is which is up to you] > In RS-485 NETWORK mode, you need to communication with ONLY other
BX-
> 01s on the network as the firmward within the BX-01 is identifying
a
> particular node address and then actually reading or modifying data
> at particular locations withing the other processor. It is a quite
> beautiful and powerful scheme.
>
> Imagine if you had a 50 floor building and you wanted a
> microprocessor on each floor to tell you if doors were open and
> closed. It is really not a problem. In Network mode you have 22
i/0
> pin available to keep track of 22 doors [or if you have more doors,
> you can encode binary logic for 2 to the 22 power].
>
> All you need is call up a floor [call a microprocessor] and read a
> few bytes to get a complete report.
>
> The RS-485 network is far superior to RS-232 for cost, for
distance,
> for noise rejection, and simplicity. It allows peer-to-peer as
well
> as master-slave. It can be used in a one line arrangement, a star,
> or other arrangements with repeaters and hubs that are available.
>
> The gist of this is that you can create a large dedicated network
> that doesn't require the purchase of a LAN and a PC at each
station.
> In many situations all that hardware not only is a waste of money,
> but a risk for damage or theft as it is left unattended.
>
> This is great stuff with lots of applications and cost savings!!!
>
> --- In basicx@basi..., "G. Kramer Herzog" <hwanghetw@y...>
> wrote:
> > I have the BX-01, a RAMsandwich, a LCD, and the BasicX
Development
> > Station.
> >
> > I have struggled with getting it into use, but finally feel
> confident
> > about moving ahead.
> >
> > I see questions and comments about thing. For example, 'Why does
> pin
> > #3 have to be High? [it is part of the arbitration between the
Ram
> and
> > the LCD enable.
> >
> > My goal is to get all of it working and I would be happy to share
> my
> > information and test programs as NetMedia seems to have been too
> busy
> > with other products to really support this one.
> >
> > Also, I just figured out a way to use two processors on the
> development
> > board concurrently. This may perk more interest in using the BX-
01
> and
> > the RAM sandwich to create a hefty system.
> >
> > G.K. Herzog - Taiwan


Reply by G. Kramer Herzog August 14, 20052005-08-14
This is a correction and addition to what was said below in previous
postings.

The RAM sandwich does use 16 I/O pins to multiplex data and address,
but additionally the LCD shares the data pins.

In looking into the 4 buttons, I find that they can be addresses via
Extended I/O commands at address 3074. The implications of this is
that all of the Extended I/O addresses are available on the 16 pins
used by the RAM sandwich and the LCD.

The big question is what occurs with the Read and Write enable. Also
what occurs with any other functions [such as Chip Select in the
schematic].

If I had an immediate application, I would ask Netmedia to help, but
they really don't seem available for speculation and theory.

If you want to DIY, you best look into the documents for each chip on
the RAMsandwich board as I have found that the DATA latch has its
enable function marked as Vss on the schematic. Similarly, the
Development Board has serveral 10k resistors marked at 100K
resistors. Thus, while I assume that the route is correct, the
markings are sometimes wrong.

The READ/WRITE ENABLE are used to allow and disallow the LCD access
to the data bus and to tell the LCD that it can properly read. The 4
buttons have no such control and are simply polled as reading an
extended I/0 address. Sinces there are no latches on these switches,
polling must be frequent or a pressed button may go unnoticed.

This in turn begs the question of how can the extended I/o truly
serve a useful purpose. Without the use of the buttons and without
the use of the LCD, you have sixteen i/o pins to use and can have
65536 address combinations [or are these really data combination?
that are termed addresses in the programing language?]. So, it seems
that there is quite a bit of i/o availabe on the BX01, even when
using the RAMsandwich. And with a complete understanding and some
diligent programing, one might be able to have the i/o bus serve four
purposes - the RAMsandwich, the LCD, the Buttons, and Extended I/O.

More moderately, I think that the LCD, the Buttons, and the
RAMsandwich are intended to work together. This ties up roughly 12
of the 16 I/O lines if they are only used for two purposes. The
implication is that there are another 4 i/o lines that can be used in
extended i/o without fully comprehending the hardward/software design.

Good luck. --- In basicx@basi..., "G. Kramer Herzog" <hwanghetw@y...>
wrote:
> I don't have a web page, so this is the only place that you will
see
> and information.
>
> The RAMsandwich is a bit more than RAM. It is an LCD interface,
has
> 4 buttons, and input to/from 128k of RAM in two pages. Ther first
> page is merely called RAM and the second page is called XRAM for
> extended RAM. The RAM module is connect through a tri-state buffer
> that serves to 8 bits of parallel data with 8 of the 16bits of RAM
> address. This occurs when the RAM is properly enabled. In a
second
> mode the 8 bits of data are provided to the LCD for i/o and control
> of its functions. I am not sure if the 4 buttons are concurrently
> usable as I don't have the schematic right in front of me.
>
> The main point here is that data and address are prepared for a
> multiplex arrangement in the BX-01. The processor alternately
> sends/receives addresses and data.
>
> This arrangement ties up 16 of the 40 pins for RAM data and address
> and a few other pins for ChipSelect and PageSelect functions.
> Thusly, the RAM chip mode restricts the number of pins available
for
> other i/o more than any other mode. Still you have at least one COM
> port on board to use for either RS-232 or RS-485 or TTL serial
> between the processor and another device. The great advantage lies
> in that you have 128K of RAM for a data logger or data buffer or
> both. This allows fairly longterm data collection or high speed
> throughput of data.
>
> It should be noted that the BX-01 is quite unlike the BX-24 and BX-
35
> as the two main functions significantly change the number of pins
> available and the way you use the device. I fondly thing of them
as
> Dr. Jekel and Mr. Hyde. [which is which is up to you] > In RS-485 NETWORK mode, you need to communication with ONLY other
BX-
> 01s on the network as the firmward within the BX-01 is identifying
a
> particular node address and then actually reading or modifying data
> at particular locations withing the other processor. It is a quite
> beautiful and powerful scheme.
>
> Imagine if you had a 50 floor building and you wanted a
> microprocessor on each floor to tell you if doors were open and
> closed. It is really not a problem. In Network mode you have 22
i/0
> pin available to keep track of 22 doors [or if you have more doors,
> you can encode binary logic for 2 to the 22 power].
>
> All you need is call up a floor [call a microprocessor] and read a
> few bytes to get a complete report.
>
> The RS-485 network is far superior to RS-232 for cost, for
distance,
> for noise rejection, and simplicity. It allows peer-to-peer as
well
> as master-slave. It can be used in a one line arrangement, a star,
> or other arrangements with repeaters and hubs that are available.
>
> The gist of this is that you can create a large dedicated network
> that doesn't require the purchase of a LAN and a PC at each
station.
> In many situations all that hardware not only is a waste of money,
> but a risk for damage or theft as it is left unattended.
>
> This is great stuff with lots of applications and cost savings!!!
>
> --- In basicx@basi..., "G. Kramer Herzog" <hwanghetw@y...>
> wrote:
> > I have the BX-01, a RAMsandwich, a LCD, and the BasicX
Development
> > Station.
> >
> > I have struggled with getting it into use, but finally feel
> confident
> > about moving ahead.
> >
> > I see questions and comments about thing. For example, 'Why does
> pin
> > #3 have to be High? [it is part of the arbitration between the
Ram
> and
> > the LCD enable.
> >
> > My goal is to get all of it working and I would be happy to share
> my
> > information and test programs as NetMedia seems to have been too
> busy
> > with other products to really support this one.
> >
> > Also, I just figured out a way to use two processors on the
> development
> > board concurrently. This may perk more interest in using the BX-
01
> and
> > the RAM sandwich to create a hefty system.
> >
> > G.K. Herzog - Taiwan


Reply by G. Kramer Herzog August 11, 20052005-08-11
I don't have a web page, so this is the only place that you will see
and information.

The RAMsandwich is a bit more than RAM. It is an LCD interface, has
4 buttons, and input to/from 128k of RAM in two pages. Ther first
page is merely called RAM and the second page is called XRAM for
extended RAM. The RAM module is connect through a tri-state buffer
that serves to 8 bits of parallel data with 8 of the 16bits of RAM
address. This occurs when the RAM is properly enabled. In a second
mode the 8 bits of data are provided to the LCD for i/o and control
of its functions. I am not sure if the 4 buttons are concurrently
usable as I don't have the schematic right in front of me.

The main point here is that data and address are prepared for a
multiplex arrangement in the BX-01. The processor alternately
sends/receives addresses and data.

This arrangement ties up 16 of the 40 pins for RAM data and address
and a few other pins for ChipSelect and PageSelect functions.
Thusly, the RAM chip mode restricts the number of pins available for
other i/o more than any other mode. Still you have at least one COM
port on board to use for either RS-232 or RS-485 or TTL serial
between the processor and another device. The great advantage lies
in that you have 128K of RAM for a data logger or data buffer or
both. This allows fairly longterm data collection or high speed
throughput of data.

It should be noted that the BX-01 is quite unlike the BX-24 and BX-35
as the two main functions significantly change the number of pins
available and the way you use the device. I fondly thing of them as
Dr. Jekel and Mr. Hyde. [which is which is up to you] In RS-485 NETWORK mode, you need to communication with ONLY other BX-
01s on the network as the firmward within the BX-01 is identifying a
particular node address and then actually reading or modifying data
at particular locations withing the other processor. It is a quite
beautiful and powerful scheme.

Imagine if you had a 50 floor building and you wanted a
microprocessor on each floor to tell you if doors were open and
closed. It is really not a problem. In Network mode you have 22 i/0
pin available to keep track of 22 doors [or if you have more doors,
you can encode binary logic for 2 to the 22 power].

All you need is call up a floor [call a microprocessor] and read a
few bytes to get a complete report.

The RS-485 network is far superior to RS-232 for cost, for distance,
for noise rejection, and simplicity. It allows peer-to-peer as well
as master-slave. It can be used in a one line arrangement, a star,
or other arrangements with repeaters and hubs that are available.

The gist of this is that you can create a large dedicated network
that doesn't require the purchase of a LAN and a PC at each station.
In many situations all that hardware not only is a waste of money,
but a risk for damage or theft as it is left unattended.

This is great stuff with lots of applications and cost savings!!!

--- In basicx@basi..., "G. Kramer Herzog" <hwanghetw@y...>
wrote:
> I have the BX-01, a RAMsandwich, a LCD, and the BasicX Development
> Station.
>
> I have struggled with getting it into use, but finally feel
confident
> about moving ahead.
>
> I see questions and comments about thing. For example, 'Why does
pin
> #3 have to be High? [it is part of the arbitration between the Ram
and
> the LCD enable.
>
> My goal is to get all of it working and I would be happy to share
my
> information and test programs as NetMedia seems to have been too
busy
> with other products to really support this one.
>
> Also, I just figured out a way to use two processors on the
development
> board concurrently. This may perk more interest in using the BX-01
and
> the RAM sandwich to create a hefty system.
>
> G.K. Herzog - Taiwan


Reply by G. Kramer Herzog August 4, 20052005-08-04
I have the BX-01, a RAMsandwich, a LCD, and the BasicX Development
Station.

I have struggled with getting it into use, but finally feel confident
about moving ahead.

I see questions and comments about thing. For example, 'Why does pin
#3 have to be High? [it is part of the arbitration between the Ram and
the LCD enable.

My goal is to get all of it working and I would be happy to share my
information and test programs as NetMedia seems to have been too busy
with other products to really support this one.

Also, I just figured out a way to use two processors on the development
board concurrently. This may perk more interest in using the BX-01 and
the RAM sandwich to create a hefty system.

G.K. Herzog - Taiwan