Reply by Alex Gibson September 19, 20052005-09-19
<mathtutoring@comcast.net> wrote in message 
news:hm5mi19v18hu88ms9ig7inmv5o44773uvb@4ax.com...
> Hi to all: > > I'm looking for a microprocessor trainer that I can program in > assembly language, maybe C, and having a usb connection. > > It would be nice to have a hex keypad on the board as well. I'm > familiar with the 68hc11 and the Z80, 8085, etc...Maybe want to make a > step up. > > I want to work with some of my students with this, and have the > ability to tie circuits to it..Have a small breadboard on the main > board of the trainer. > > Thanks for the help. I've looked on the net, but haven't found > anything real close to what I want. > > Does Parallax make anything that can be programmed using assembly > language? What is the SX-key and the SX chips all about? > > > Thanks for all the help, > > Art
http://www.futurlec.com/Boards.shtml low cost pic , avr and 8051 boards Boards are cheap enough for students to buy their own. Microchip has a free student version of their c compiler for the 18f pics. Plugs into mplab There is a gcc port for the Atmel avr chips. To see what can be done with avrs http://instruct1.cit.cornell.edu/courses/ee476/ http://instruct1.cit.cornell.edu/courses/ee476/FinalProjects/ Also look at www.avrfreaks.com http://www.avrfreaks.net/index.php?module=FreaksAcademy An avr butterfly + carrier board may be suitable http://www.ecrostech.com/Products/Butterfly/Intro.htm Avr butterfly http://www.atmel.com/dyn/products/tools_card.asp?tool_id=3146 avr gcc code for butterfly http://www.siwawi.arubi.uni-kl.de/avr_projects/ http://www.dontronics.com/sbbb.html http://www.emona.com.au/catalogue/Section_27/1.html http://www.ceet.niu.edu/faculty/azad/MicProc.html http://www.oztechnics.com.au/devtools.htm http://www.mikroelektronika.co.yu/english/ http://www.mikroelektronika.co.yu/english/product/tools/etools.htm http://www.iguanalabs.com/mbkit.htm
Reply by Eric September 18, 20052005-09-18
I'm mostly a PC programmer so I'm definitely not an expert on
programming these boards. Its just a hobby for me.

They come fully assembled. It's a great price for what you get. Go to
the Freescale website for the details on the processor. I'm going from
memory here but I think it has 256K of flash (Freescale also has a 512K
flash version), 2K of EEPROM, and 12K of RAM (it may be 8K RAM - but
it's quite a lot).

These devices are very memory-efficient so I've never used more than 4K
in my own little programs.

The devices with d-bug12 are used to develop programs that get
downloaded and run from RAM. You can set breakpoints, trace, etc. But
it's harder to program flash with these devices because you have to use
the bootloader and overwrite d-bug12 itself with your program. Most
colleges use d-bug12 because they like the debugging features and they
don't need to program flash, anyway.

If you know you'll need to use flash you can use devices in the new
9s12Cxxx series because these come with a serial monitor that makes it
easy to program flash. My IDEs can download programs to flash using the
serial monitor but I don't support interactive debugging yet.
Technological Arts has a free program called ubug12 that has some
debugging support for the serial monitor.

The commercial CodeWarrior IDE is much better than mine and it comes in
a free version that works with up to 8K of memory, I think.

Eric

Reply by September 17, 20052005-09-17
Hi Eric:

thanks so much for the tip!
The Dragon 12 board looks like exactly what I'm looking for.
do you know if the processor and all that comes with it?  Are these
boards already built and tested?
I was also really looking for keypad which it comes with.  That is
teriffic!  How much experience do you have with these boards?

I build my own small, wire wrapped board using the 68hc11E1 and really
enjoyed messing around with it.
I would like a little more information about the 9s12dp256...I'm
assuming that it has 256k memory, and the 12 comes from the HC12 ?

Any information that you can pass on, I would really appreciate it!

Thanks,

Art

On 17 Sep 2005 18:15:01 -0700, "Eric" <englere.geo@yahoo.com> wrote:

>The Parallax company has about the best support in the business and >they know a lot about education. Generally speaking their Basic Stamp >products are the best for students. PIC devices have a Harvard >architecture and they can be difficult to learn at the assembly level. >They also have terribly small amounts of memory and some unusually odd >instructions. > >The SX key is just a type of ISP (in-circuit programmer). Parallax was >one of the first companies to do this, but now a lot of companies do >it. Freescale (formerly Morotola) has a serial monitor and a BDM and >most others have JTAGs and some kind of serial programming also. > >I work a lot with college professors because I make free IDEs for the >Freescale 8 and 16 bit devices. These are common in colleges because >they need low cost boards, and they're pretty easy to program using >only open source tools. Professors like open source because they don't >like to negoiate legal matters with their legal offices. > >I like to recommend the Wytec company (http://www.evbplus.com/) as a >hardware supplier because they seem to give the most bang for the buck. >But Technological Arts isn't bad either. > >An EVB board based in the 9s12DP256 (a souped-up 68hc12) comes with a >nice d-bug12 monitor (souped-up Buffalo). Or you could go with the cute >little boards that use the 9s12C32 device (easy to program flash over a >serial port). > >But I seriously like Parallax as a company - I'm just not real happy >with PIC assembly programming. However, if you decide on going with PIC >you absolutely MUST get Myke Predko's book "Programming and Customizing >PICmicro&#2013266094; Microcontrollers". There are no better books on PIC assembly >programming and Myke is a serious expert on all the little "gotchas" of >the PIC devices. > >Eric >http://www.ericengler.com/AsmIDE.aspx
Reply by Eric September 17, 20052005-09-17
The Parallax company has about the best support in the business and
they know a lot about education. Generally speaking their Basic Stamp
products are the best for students. PIC devices have a Harvard
architecture and they can be difficult to learn at the assembly level.
They also have terribly small amounts of memory and some unusually odd
instructions.

The SX key is just a type of ISP (in-circuit programmer). Parallax was
one of the first companies to do this, but now a lot of companies do
it. Freescale (formerly Morotola) has a serial monitor and a BDM and
most others have JTAGs and some kind of serial programming also.

I work a lot with college professors because I make free IDEs for the
Freescale 8 and 16 bit devices. These are common in colleges because
they need low cost boards, and they're pretty easy to program using
only open source tools. Professors like open source because they don't
like to negoiate legal matters with their legal offices.

I like to recommend the Wytec company (http://www.evbplus.com/) as a
hardware supplier because they seem to give the most bang for the buck.
But Technological Arts isn't bad either.

An EVB board based in the 9s12DP256 (a souped-up 68hc12) comes with a
nice d-bug12 monitor (souped-up Buffalo). Or you could go with the cute
little boards that use the 9s12C32 device (easy to program flash over a
serial port).

But I seriously like Parallax as a company - I'm just not real happy
with PIC assembly programming. However, if you decide on going with PIC
you absolutely MUST get Myke Predko's book "Programming and Customizing
PICmicro=AE Microcontrollers". There are no better books on PIC assembly
programming and Myke is a serious expert on all the little "gotchas" of
the PIC devices.=20

Eric
http://www.ericengler.com/AsmIDE.aspx

Reply by Hans September 17, 20052005-09-17
What about making your own board? You can find many free FPGA 
implementations of 8/16 bits processors on the web. You can buy an FPGA 
prototype board + development tools for less than $150 (e.g. 
http://www.terasic.com/english/fpga_01.htm).

Some examples:

6809 http://members.optushome.com.au/jekent/system09/index.html
8088 http://www.ht-lab.com/hardware/APABoard/APABoard.html
8051 http://www.oregano.at/ip/8051.htm
6502 http://www.opencores.org/projects.cgi/web/t65/overview
Z80  www.e.kth.se/~e93_daw/vhdl/+z80+VHDL&hl=en

Just a thought,

Hans.
www.ht-lab.com

<mathtutoring@comcast.net> wrote in message 
news:hm5mi19v18hu88ms9ig7inmv5o44773uvb@4ax.com...
> Hi to all: > > I'm looking for a microprocessor trainer that I can program in > assembly language, maybe C, and having a usb connection. > > It would be nice to have a hex keypad on the board as well. I'm > familiar with the 68hc11 and the Z80, 8085, etc...Maybe want to make a > step up. > > I want to work with some of my students with this, and have the > ability to tie circuits to it..Have a small breadboard on the main > board of the trainer. > > Thanks for the help. I've looked on the net, but haven't found > anything real close to what I want. > > Does Parallax make anything that can be programmed using assembly > language? What is the SX-key and the SX chips all about? > > > Thanks for all the help, > > Art
Reply by Yvan BOURNE September 16, 20052005-09-16
Hi,
Have a look at FREESCALE 68hc908, 9S08or 9S12 families.

--
---
Yvan
http://www.ybdesign.fr

Pour me r&#2013265929;pondre : http://cerbermail.com/?SrJYCoIx8E




<mathtutoring@comcast.net> a &#2013265929;crit dans le message de news:
hm5mi19v18hu88ms9ig7inmv5o44773uvb@4ax.com...
> Hi to all: > > I'm looking for a microprocessor trainer that I can program in > assembly language, maybe C, and having a usb connection. > > It would be nice to have a hex keypad on the board as well. I'm > familiar with the 68hc11 and the Z80, 8085, etc...Maybe want to make a > step up. > > I want to work with some of my students with this, and have the > ability to tie circuits to it..Have a small breadboard on the main > board of the trainer. > > Thanks for the help. I've looked on the net, but haven't found > anything real close to what I want. > > Does Parallax make anything that can be programmed using assembly > language? What is the SX-key and the SX chips all about? > > > Thanks for all the help, > > Art
Reply by September 16, 20052005-09-16
Hi to all:

I'm looking for a microprocessor trainer that I can program in
assembly language, maybe C, and having a usb connection.

It would be nice to have a hex keypad on the board as well.  I'm
familiar with the 68hc11 and the Z80, 8085, etc...Maybe want to make a
step up.

I want to work with some of my students with this, and have the
ability to tie circuits to it..Have a small breadboard on the main
board of the trainer.

Thanks for the help.  I've looked on the net, but haven't found
anything real close to what I want. 

Does Parallax make anything that can be programmed using assembly
language?  What is the SX-key and the SX chips all about?


Thanks for all the help,

Art