Reply by Andy Sinclair May 30, 20082008-05-30
Florian E. Teply wrote:
>> How close does this get you? >> http://www.gnu-m68hc11.org/m68hc11_download.php > >Umm, i guess this is *quite* close ;-)
I successfully use this to develop for the HCS12X. Note however that gcc will not compile XGATE code. AFAIK there is no open source XGATE compiler, however, there is an assembler available: http://sourceforge.net/projects/hsw12asm/
Reply by David Brown May 30, 20082008-05-30
Grant Edwards wrote:
> On 2008-05-29, David Brown <david@westcontrol.removethisbit.com> wrote: > >> gcc provides better syntax checking than any other compiler I have >> tried. However, I don't believe there is a gcc port for the 68HCS12 - > > Yes there is. > >> if such a thing exists, it would only be as a minor partial port. > > What do you mean by a "minor partial port"? It's in the > mainline gcc source tree, and it seemed to work fine for me. > The code it generated was far better than the last commercial > 6811 compiler I used. >
Sorry, I was thinking of the 8-bit Motorola/Freescale devices, not the 16-bit devices. So I got that one completely wrong.
Reply by Grant Edwards May 29, 20082008-05-29
On 2008-05-29, Florian E. Teply <onlinefloh@usenet.cnntp.org> wrote:

> And -- i just checked -- the gcc man page lists in the "machine dependent > options" section the options -m68hc12 and -m68hcs12 in version 4.3.0. > I'll probably try and get this to work, but as said: using gcc as a mere > syntax checker would already be a start.
Gcc is a single-target design: you have to build a separate gcc installation for each target architecture. IOW, you can't switch from IA32 to HC12 target architecture by merely changing the command line arguments passed to a single gcc binary.
>> It is quite possible to use gcc for a different target as a static >> analysis tool. I've done that along with a commercial compiler for a >> target (I've forgotten which - it was a long time ago) - gcc "compiles" >> the program natively for the host (linking tended to fail...). It might >> mean a little bit of fiddling to get the right headers at the right >> place, and perhaps an extra header defining macros for any compiler >> extensions used by the real target compiler, but it can often work well. >> You can also use gcc to generate the makefile dependencies at the same >> time. > >> An alternative is to use a dedicated static analysis tool. The big one >> is PC-Lint, which is a reasonable price on Windows (but absurdly four >> times the price on Linux - and I doubt they support PPC Linux). The >> open source option is splint, which should be fine on your system. > > Thanks, will have a look at splint.
In my experience splint is useless for real world work. It'll warn you about code like this: uint8_t b; b = 1; Splint is unhappy because b is 8 bits wide and "1" is 16 or 32 bits wide (depending on your target), and the assignment is loosing bits. If you turn that warning off, then you _won't_ get warned about code like this: uint32_t u; uint8_t b; b = 123456789L; b = u; The only solution is to completely cover your code with type-casts. The result is code without splint warnings, but it's completely impossible to read/maintain. I looked into trying to fix up splint to make it useful for real work, but gave up after looking at the internals. The "owners" of splint acknowledged on the splint mailing list that splint was intended for language research and not for use with real programs. -- Grant Edwards grante Yow! Is this going to at involve RAW human ecstasy? visi.com
Reply by May 29, 20082008-05-29
On May 29, 2:49 am, onlinef...@usenet.cnntp.org (Florian E. Teply)
wrote:

> as you might guess from the subject: I'm trying to find a toolchain for > freescale's hcs12 or S12X family of microcontrollers. Currently i'm > using Codewarrior on the Windows machine at work, but as i'm a tad > dissatisfied by it's lack of decent syntax-checking and have no windows > at home, i'd rather use some free compiler available for my rather > unusual platform (Linux on PowerPC). So gcc would probably be the best > bet.
Understand your frustration with codewarrior, however one reason for sticking with it is the fairly good BDM in-circuit debug capability of the HCS12 family. The pod will set you back $100, but ultimately it is worth it. I don't know if a gcc-based tool chain will really be able to leverage that.
Reply by Florian E. Teply May 29, 20082008-05-29
David Brown <david@westcontrol.removethisbit.com> wrote:
> Florian E. Teply wrote: > > Hiya folks, > > > > as you might guess from the subject: I'm trying to find a toolchain for > > freescale's hcs12 or S12X family of microcontrollers. Currently i'm > > using Codewarrior on the Windows machine at work, but as i'm a tad > > dissatisfied by it's lack of decent syntax-checking and have no windows > > at home, i'd rather use some free compiler available for my rather > > unusual platform (Linux on PowerPC). So gcc would probably be the best > > bet. > > > > Has any of you guys experience with that combination or another > > suggestion (apart from buying some windows machine)?? > >
> gcc provides better syntax checking than any other compiler I have > tried. However, I don't believe there is a gcc port for the 68HCS12 - > if such a thing exists, it would only be as a minor partial port. But > there are a couple of other ways to achieve what you want without > dropping Codeworrier.
I'm not necessarily into dropping Codewarrior, i thought more like using gcc as some sort of syntax check while not at work, so i can test the stuff at home and concentrate on fixing this mess at work ;-) Proper binaries would be an added bonus though. And -- i just checked -- the gcc man page lists in the "machine dependent options" section the options -m68hc12 and -m68hcs12 in version 4.3.0. I'll probably try and get this to work, but as said: using gcc as a mere syntax checker would already be a start.
> It is quite possible to use gcc for a different target as a static > analysis tool. I've done that along with a commercial compiler for a > target (I've forgotten which - it was a long time ago) - gcc "compiles" > the program natively for the host (linking tended to fail...). It might > mean a little bit of fiddling to get the right headers at the right > place, and perhaps an extra header defining macros for any compiler > extensions used by the real target compiler, but it can often work well. > You can also use gcc to generate the makefile dependencies at the same > time.
> An alternative is to use a dedicated static analysis tool. The big one > is PC-Lint, which is a reasonable price on Windows (but absurdly four > times the price on Linux - and I doubt they support PPC Linux). The > open source option is splint, which should be fine on your system.
Thanks, will have a look at splint. Greetings, Florian
Reply by Florian E. Teply May 29, 20082008-05-29
FreeRTOS.org <noemail@given.com> wrote:

> "Florian E. Teply" <onlinefloh@usenet.cnntp.org> wrote in message > news:n902h5-9g2.ln1@mobile-news.teply.info... > > Hiya folks, > > > > as you might guess from the subject: I'm trying to find a toolchain for > > freescale's hcs12 or S12X family of microcontrollers. Currently i'm > > using Codewarrior on the Windows machine at work, but as i'm a tad > > dissatisfied by it's lack of decent syntax-checking and have no windows > > at home, i'd rather use some free compiler available for my rather > > unusual platform (Linux on PowerPC). So gcc would probably be the best > > bet. > > > > Has any of you guys experience with that combination or another > > suggestion (apart from buying some windows machine)?? > > > > Greetings, > > Florian > >
> How close does this get you? > http://www.gnu-m68hc11.org/m68hc11_download.php
Umm, i guess this is *quite* close ;-) Thanks, Florian
Reply by Grant Edwards May 29, 20082008-05-29
On 2008-05-29, David Brown <david@westcontrol.removethisbit.com> wrote:

> gcc provides better syntax checking than any other compiler I have > tried. However, I don't believe there is a gcc port for the 68HCS12 -
Yes there is.
> if such a thing exists, it would only be as a minor partial port.
What do you mean by a "minor partial port"? It's in the mainline gcc source tree, and it seemed to work fine for me. The code it generated was far better than the last commercial 6811 compiler I used. -- Grant Edwards grante Yow! Gee, I feel kind of at LIGHT in the head now, visi.com knowing I can't make my satellite dish PAYMENTS!
Reply by Grant Edwards May 29, 20082008-05-29
On 2008-05-29, Florian E. Teply <onlinefloh@usenet.cnntp.org> wrote:

> as you might guess from the subject: I'm trying to find a toolchain for > freescale's hcs12 or S12X family of microcontrollers. Currently i'm > using Codewarrior on the Windows machine at work, but as i'm a tad > dissatisfied by it's lack of decent syntax-checking and have no windows > at home, i'd rather use some free compiler available for my rather > unusual platform (Linux on PowerPC). So gcc would probably be the best > bet. > > Has any of you guys experience with that combination or another > suggestion (apart from buying some windows machine)??
Building a toolchain isn't too hard. Below is the shell script I used last time I built a toolchain for the 6812. That was probably a couple years ago I included newlib in my build, but IIRC, you can build a 6812 compiler without any libc at all if you prefer. ------------------------------build-6812.sh------------------------------ #!/bin/bash DEST=/opt/gnu/testing TARGET=m6812-elf BINVERS=2.15_v0501 GCCVERS=3.4.3 NLBVERS=20030821-kpit3.04 GDBVERS=6.1 HERE=$PWD SRC=$PWD/src BLD=$PWD/bld set -e echo "+++ cleaning old source directory" rm -rf $SRC echo "+++ cleaning old build directory" rm -rf $BLD export PATH=$DEST/bin:$PATH mkdir -p $SRC function do-binutils { echo "+++ extracting binutils" tar xzvf binutils-$BINVERS.tar.gz -C $SRC echo "+++ configuring binutils" mkdir -p $BLD/binutils pushd $BLD/binutils $SRC/binutils-$BINVERS/configure \ --target=$TARGET \ --prefix=$DEST \ 2>&1 | tee configure.log echo "+++ building binutils" make 2>&1 | tee make.log echo "+++ installing binutils" make install 2>&1 | tee makeinstall.log echo "+++ finshed binutils" popd # rm -rf $SRC/binutils-* $BLD/binutils } function do-gcc { echo "=== extracting gcc" tar xzvf gcc-$GCCVERS.tar.gz -C $SRC if [ -d $HERE/patches/gcc ] then echo "=== patching gcc" pushd $SRC/gcc-$GCCVERS (for f in $HERE/patches/gcc/* do echo "==== $f" patch -p0 <$f done) 2>&1 | tee patch.log popd fi echo "=== extracting newlib" tar xzvf newlib-$NLBVERS.tar.gz -C $SRC mv $SRC/newlib-$NLBVERS/newlib $SRC/gcc-$GCCVERS mv $SRC/newlib-$NLBVERS/libgloss $SRC/gcc-$GCCVERS echo "=== configuring gcc" mkdir -p $BLD/gcc pushd $BLD/gcc $SRC/gcc-$GCCVERS/configure \ --target=$TARGET \ --prefix=$DEST \ --enable-languages=c \ --with-gnu-as \ --with-gnu-ld \ --with-newlib \ -v 2>&1 | tee configure.log echo "=== building gcc" make 2>&1 | tee make.log echo "=== installing gcc" make install 2>&1 | tee makeinstall.log echo "=== finished gcc" popd # rm -rf $SRC/gcc-* $SRC/newlib-* $BLD/gcc } function do-gdb { echo "=== extracting gdb" tar xzvf gdb-$GDBVERS.tar.gz -C src echo "=== configuring gdb" mkdir -p $BLD/gdb pushd $BLD/gdb $SRC/gdb-$GDBVERS/configure \ --target=m6811-elf \ --prefix=$DEST \ -v 2>&1 | tee configure.log echo "=== building gdb" make 2>&1 | tee make.log echo "=== installing gdb" make install 2>&1 | tee makeinstall.log echo "=== finished gdb" popd # rm -rf $SRC/gdb-* $BLD/gdb } do-binutils do-gcc do-gdb ------------------------------------------------------------------------- -- Grant Edwards grante Yow! HUMAN REPLICAS are at inserted into VATS of visi.com NUTRITIONAL YEAST ...
Reply by FreeRTOS.org May 29, 20082008-05-29
"Florian E. Teply" <onlinefloh@usenet.cnntp.org> wrote in message 
news:n902h5-9g2.ln1@mobile-news.teply.info...
> Hiya folks, > > as you might guess from the subject: I'm trying to find a toolchain for > freescale's hcs12 or S12X family of microcontrollers. Currently i'm > using Codewarrior on the Windows machine at work, but as i'm a tad > dissatisfied by it's lack of decent syntax-checking and have no windows > at home, i'd rather use some free compiler available for my rather > unusual platform (Linux on PowerPC). So gcc would probably be the best > bet. > > Has any of you guys experience with that combination or another > suggestion (apart from buying some windows machine)?? > > Greetings, > Florian >
How close does this get you? http://www.gnu-m68hc11.org/m68hc11_download.php -- Regards, Richard. + http://www.FreeRTOS.org & http://www.FreeRTOS.org/shop 17 official architecture ports, more than 5000 downloads per month. + http://www.SafeRTOS.com Certified by T&#2013265948;V as meeting the requirements for safety related systems.
Reply by David Brown May 29, 20082008-05-29
Florian E. Teply wrote:
> Hiya folks, > > as you might guess from the subject: I'm trying to find a toolchain for > freescale's hcs12 or S12X family of microcontrollers. Currently i'm > using Codewarrior on the Windows machine at work, but as i'm a tad > dissatisfied by it's lack of decent syntax-checking and have no windows > at home, i'd rather use some free compiler available for my rather > unusual platform (Linux on PowerPC). So gcc would probably be the best > bet. > > Has any of you guys experience with that combination or another > suggestion (apart from buying some windows machine)?? >
gcc provides better syntax checking than any other compiler I have tried. However, I don't believe there is a gcc port for the 68HCS12 - if such a thing exists, it would only be as a minor partial port. But there are a couple of other ways to achieve what you want without dropping Codeworrier. It is quite possible to use gcc for a different target as a static analysis tool. I've done that along with a commercial compiler for a target (I've forgotten which - it was a long time ago) - gcc "compiles" the program natively for the host (linking tended to fail...). It might mean a little bit of fiddling to get the right headers at the right place, and perhaps an extra header defining macros for any compiler extensions used by the real target compiler, but it can often work well. You can also use gcc to generate the makefile dependencies at the same time. An alternative is to use a dedicated static analysis tool. The big one is PC-Lint, which is a reasonable price on Windows (but absurdly four times the price on Linux - and I doubt they support PPC Linux). The open source option is splint, which should be fine on your system.