RE lcd

Started by Captain Impala June 9, 2010
Below is a copy/paste from the Bascom AVR manual.
Attaching an LCD Display, with bascom avr.

A LCD display can be connected with two methods.

By wiring the LCD-pins to the processor port pins. This is the pin mode. The advantage is that you can choose the pins and that they don't have to be on the same port. This can make your PCB design simple. The disadvantage is that more code is needed.

By attaching the LCD-data pins to the data bus. This is convenient when you have an external RAM chip and will add only a little extra code.

The LCD-display can be connected in PIN mode as follows:

LCD DISPLAY
PORT
PIN

DB7
PORTB.7
14

DB6
PORTB.6
13

DB5
PORTB.5
12

DB4
PORTB.4
11

E
PORTB.3
6

RS
PORTB.2
4

RW
Ground
5

Vss
Ground
1

Vdd
+5 Volt
2

Vo
0-5 Volt
3

This leaves PORTB.1 and PORTB.0 and PORTD for other purposes.

You can change these pin settings from the Options LCD menu.

BASCOM supports many statements to control the LCD-display.

For those who want to have more control of the example below shows how to use the internal BASCOM routines.

$ASM

Ldi _temp1, 5 'load register R24 with value

Rcall _Lcd_control 'it is a control value to control the display

Ldi _temp1,65 'load register with new value (letter A)

Rcall _Write_lcd 'write it to the LCD-display

$END ASM

Note that _lcd_control and _write_lcd are assembler subroutines which can be called from BASCOM.

See the manufacturer's details from your LCD display and for the correct pin assignment for your exact microprocessor.


There are two types of LCD displays available. One is the raw LCD display
itself, which would require the proper display drivers and you'd have to do
all the firmware to generate characters yourself.

The other is the LCD with the controller attached. These are much easier to
use and I suspect what you're referring to below.

If you're referring to the original posting by s...@yahoo.com, we
don't even know what he had in mind. Is it the first or the second type? If
the second, how many rows and characters does it display? What is the
controller chip?

Until we know that, we really can't offer any help.

Zack

On Mon, Jun 7, 2010 at 6:13 PM, Captain Impala wrote:

> Below is a copy/paste from the Bascom AVR manual.
>
> Attaching an LCD Display, with bascom avr.
>
> A LCD display can be connected with two methods.
>
> By wiring the LCD-pins to the processor port pins. This is the pin mode.
> The advantage is that you can choose the pins and that they don't have to be
> on the same port. This can make your PCB design simple. The disadvantage is
> that more code is needed.
>
> By attaching the LCD-data pins to the data bus. This is convenient when
> you have an external RAM chip and will add only a little extra code.
>
> The LCD-display can be connected in PIN mode as follows:
>
> LCD DISPLAY
> PORT
> PIN
>
> DB7
> PORTB.7
> 14
>
> DB6
> PORTB.6
> 13
>
> DB5
> PORTB.5
> 12
>
> DB4
> PORTB.4
> 11
>
> E
> PORTB.3
> 6
>
> RS
> PORTB.2
> 4
>
> RW
> Ground
> 5
>
> Vss
> Ground
> 1
>
> Vdd
> +5 Volt
> 2
>
> Vo
> 0-5 Volt
> 3
>
> This leaves PORTB.1 and PORTB.0 and PORTD for other purposes.
>
> You can change these pin settings from the Options LCD menu.
>
> BASCOM supports many statements to control the LCD-display.
>
> For those who want to have more control of the example below shows how to
> use the internal BASCOM routines.
>
> $ASM
>
> Ldi _temp1, 5 'load register R24 with value
>
> Rcall _Lcd_control 'it is a control value to control the display
>
> Ldi _temp1,65 'load register with new value (letter A)
>
> Rcall _Write_lcd 'write it to the LCD-display
>
> $END ASM
>
> Note that _lcd_control and _write_lcd are assembler subroutines which can
> be called from BASCOM.
>
> See the manufacturer's details from your LCD display and for the correct
> pin assignment for your exact microprocessor.
>
>
>


He wrote "3 1/2 digit lcd" so that's clearly not HD44780 type, I'd assume
it's raw LCD, same as for 7106 meters.

Some AVRs can drive LCDs directly, there's parametric table at Atmel's site,
their marking is usually ATmegaNN9 (ends with 9). Other option is to get LCD
driver from Maxim or some other manufacturer.

Jan
2010/6/9 Zack Widup

> There are two types of LCD displays available. One is the raw LCD display
> itself, which would require the proper display drivers and you'd have to do
> all the firmware to generate characters yourself.
>
> The other is the LCD with the controller attached. These are much easier to
> use and I suspect what you're referring to below.
>
> If you're referring to the original posting by s...@yahoo.com, we
> don't even know what he had in mind. Is it the first or the second type? If
> the second, how many rows and characters does it display? What is the
> controller chip?
>
> Until we know that, we really can't offer any help.
>
> Zack
>
> On Mon, Jun 7, 2010 at 6:13 PM, Captain Impala > >wrote:
>
> >
> >
> > Below is a copy/paste from the Bascom AVR manual.
> >
> > Attaching an LCD Display, with bascom avr.
> >
> > A LCD display can be connected with two methods.
> >
> > By wiring the LCD-pins to the processor port pins. This is the pin
> mode.
> > The advantage is that you can choose the pins and that they don't have to
> be
> > on the same port. This can make your PCB design simple. The disadvantage
> is
> > that more code is needed.
> >
> > By attaching the LCD-data pins to the data bus. This is convenient when
> > you have an external RAM chip and will add only a little extra code.
> >
> > The LCD-display can be connected in PIN mode as follows:
> >
> > LCD DISPLAY
> > PORT
> > PIN
> >
> > DB7
> > PORTB.7
> > 14
> >
> > DB6
> > PORTB.6
> > 13
> >
> > DB5
> > PORTB.5
> > 12
> >
> > DB4
> > PORTB.4
> > 11
> >
> > E
> > PORTB.3
> > 6
> >
> > RS
> > PORTB.2
> > 4
> >
> > RW
> > Ground
> > 5
> >
> > Vss
> > Ground
> > 1
> >
> > Vdd
> > +5 Volt
> > 2
> >
> > Vo
> > 0-5 Volt
> > 3
> >
> > This leaves PORTB.1 and PORTB.0 and PORTD for other purposes.
> >
> > You can change these pin settings from the Options LCD menu.
> >
> > BASCOM supports many statements to control the LCD-display.
> >
> > For those who want to have more control of the example below shows how to
> > use the internal BASCOM routines.
> >
> > $ASM
> >
> > Ldi _temp1, 5 'load register R24 with value
> >
> > Rcall _Lcd_control 'it is a control value to control the display
> >
> > Ldi _temp1,65 'load register with new value (letter A)
> >
> > Rcall _Write_lcd 'write it to the LCD-display
> >
> > $END ASM
> >
> > Note that _lcd_control and _write_lcd are assembler subroutines which can
> > be called from BASCOM.
> >
> > See the manufacturer's details from your LCD display and for the correct
> > pin assignment for your exact microprocessor.
> >
> >
> >
>
>
>
thank you very much.

--- On Wed, 6/9/10, Zack Widup wrote:

From: Zack Widup
Subject: Re: [AVR club] RE lcd
To: a...
Date: Wednesday, June 9, 2010, 11:28 AM

There are two types of LCD displays available. One is the raw LCD display
itself, which would require the proper display drivers and you'd have to do
all the firmware to generate characters yourself.

The other is the LCD with the controller attached. These are much easier to
use and I suspect what you're referring to below.

If you're referring to the original posting by s...@yahoo.com, we
don't even know what he had in mind. Is it the first or the second type? If
the second, how many rows and characters does it display? What is the
controller chip?

Until we know that, we really can't offer any help.

Zack

On Mon, Jun 7, 2010 at 6:13 PM, Captain Impala wrote:

> Below is a copy/paste from the Bascom AVR manual.
>
> Attaching an LCD Display, with bascom avr.
>
> A LCD display can be connected with two methods.
>
> By wiring the LCD-pins to the processor port pins. This is the pin mode.
> The advantage is that you can choose the pins and that they don't have to be
> on the same port. This can make your PCB design simple. The disadvantage is
> that more code is needed.
>
> By attaching the LCD-data pins to the data bus. This is convenient when
> you have an external RAM chip and will add only a little extra code.
>
> The LCD-display can be connected in PIN mode as follows:
>
> LCD DISPLAY
> PORT
> PIN
>
> DB7
> PORTB.7
> 14
>
> DB6
> PORTB.6
> 13
>
> DB5
> PORTB.5
> 12
>
> DB4
> PORTB.4
> 11
>
> E
> PORTB.3
> 6
>
> RS
> PORTB.2
> 4
>
> RW
> Ground
> 5
>
> Vss
> Ground
> 1
>
> Vdd
> +5 Volt
> 2
>
> Vo
> 0-5 Volt
> 3
>
> This leaves PORTB.1 and PORTB.0 and PORTD for other purposes.
>
> You can change these pin settings from the Options LCD menu.
>
> BASCOM supports many statements to control the LCD-display.
>
> For those who want to have more control of the example below shows how to
> use the internal BASCOM routines.
>
> $ASM
>
> Ldi _temp1, 5 'load register R24 with value
>
> Rcall _Lcd_control 'it is a control value to control the display
>
> Ldi _temp1,65 'load register with new value (letter A)
>
> Rcall _Write_lcd 'write it to the LCD-display
>
> $END ASM
>
> Note that _lcd_control and _write_lcd are assembler subroutines which can
> be called from BASCOM.
>
> See the manufacturer's details from your LCD display and for the correct
> pin assignment for your exact microprocessor.
>
>
>


I hope some of the suggestions helped you. What kind of display are you
working with?

Zack

On Thu, Jun 10, 2010 at 11:07 PM, sajjad torkan wrote:

> thank you very much.
>
> --- On Wed, 6/9/10, Zack Widup >
> wrote:
>
> From: Zack Widup >
> Subject: Re: [AVR club] RE lcd
> To: a...
> Date: Wednesday, June 9, 2010, 11:28 AM
> There are two types of LCD displays available. One is the raw LCD display
> itself, which would require the proper display drivers and you'd have to do
> all the firmware to generate characters yourself.
>
> The other is the LCD with the controller attached. These are much easier to
> use and I suspect what you're referring to below.
>
> If you're referring to the original posting by s...@yahoo.com,
> we
> don't even know what he had in mind. Is it the first or the second type? If
> the second, how many rows and characters does it display? What is the
> controller chip?
>
> Until we know that, we really can't offer any help.
>
> Zack
>
> On Mon, Jun 7, 2010 at 6:13 PM, Captain Impala
> >wrote:
>
> >
> >
> > Below is a copy/paste from the Bascom AVR manual.
> >
> > Attaching an LCD Display, with bascom avr.
> >
> > A LCD display can be connected with two methods.
> >
> > By wiring the LCD-pins to the processor port pins. This is the pin
> mode.
> > The advantage is that you can choose the pins and that they don't have to
> be
> > on the same port. This can make your PCB design simple. The disadvantage
> is
> > that more code is needed.
> >
> > By attaching the LCD-data pins to the data bus. This is convenient when
> > you have an external RAM chip and will add only a little extra code.
> >
> > The LCD-display can be connected in PIN mode as follows:
> >
> > LCD DISPLAY
> > PORT
> > PIN
> >
> > DB7
> > PORTB.7
> > 14
> >
> > DB6
> > PORTB.6
> > 13
> >
> > DB5
> > PORTB.5
> > 12
> >
> > DB4
> > PORTB.4
> > 11
> >
> > E
> > PORTB.3
> > 6
> >
> > RS
> > PORTB.2
> > 4
> >
> > RW
> > Ground
> > 5
> >
> > Vss
> > Ground
> > 1
> >
> > Vdd
> > +5 Volt
> > 2
> >
> > Vo
> > 0-5 Volt
> > 3
> >
> > This leaves PORTB.1 and PORTB.0 and PORTD for other purposes.
> >
> > You can change these pin settings from the Options LCD menu.
> >
> > BASCOM supports many statements to control the LCD-display.
> >
> > For those who want to have more control of the example below shows how to
> > use the internal BASCOM routines.
> >
> > $ASM
> >
> > Ldi _temp1, 5 'load register R24 with value
> >
> > Rcall _Lcd_control 'it is a control value to control the display
> >
> > Ldi _temp1,65 'load register with new value (letter A)
> >
> > Rcall _Write_lcd 'write it to the LCD-display
> >
> > $END ASM
> >
> > Note that _lcd_control and _write_lcd are assembler subroutines which can
> > be called from BASCOM.
> >
> > See the manufacturer's details from your LCD display and for the correct
> > pin assignment for your exact microprocessor.
> >
> >
> >
>
>
Pls let us know some good development tool for 8051 micro which is freely available on net.



Regrads

raj



On Fri, 11 Jun 2010 09:44:06 +0530 wrote

>I hope some of the suggestions helped you. What kind of display are you



working with?







Zack







On Thu, Jun 10, 2010 at 11:07 PM, sajjad torkan wrote:







>



>



> thank you very much.



>



> --- On Wed, 6/9/10, Zack Widup



> wrote:



>



> From: Zack Widup



> Subject: Re: [AVR club] RE lcd



> To: a...



> Date: Wednesday, June 9, 2010, 11:28 AM



>



>



> There are two types of LCD displays available. One is the raw LCD display



> itself, which would require the proper display drivers and you'd have to do



> all the firmware to generate characters yourself.



>



> The other is the LCD with the controller attached. These are much easier to



> use and I suspect what you're referring to below.



>



> If you're referring to the original posting by s...@yahoo.com,



> we



> don't even know what he had in mind. Is it the first or the second type? If



> the second, how many rows and characters does it display? What is the



> controller chip?



>



> Until we know that, we really can't offer any help.



>



> Zack



>



> On Mon, Jun 7, 2010 at 6:13 PM, Captain Impala >wrote:



>



> >



> >



> > Below is a copy/paste from the Bascom AVR manual.



> >



> > Attaching an LCD Display, with bascom avr.



> >



> > A LCD display can be connected with two methods.



> >



> > ·By wiring the LCD-pins to the processor port pins. This is the pin



> mode.



> > The advantage is that you can choose the pins and that they don't have to



> be



> > on the same port. This can make your PCB design simple. The disadvantage



> is



> > that more code is needed.



> >



> > ·By attaching the LCD-data pins to the data bus. This is convenient when



> > you have an external RAM chip and will add only a little extra code.



> >



> > The LCD-display can be connected in PIN mode as follows:



> >



> > LCD DISPLAY



> > PORT



> > PIN



> >



> > DB7



> > PORTB.7



> > 14



> >



> > DB6



> > PORTB.6



> > 13



> >



> > DB5



> > PORTB.5



> > 12



> >



> > DB4



> > PORTB.4



> > 11



> >



> > E



> > PORTB.3



> > 6



> >



> > RS



> > PORTB.2



> > 4



> >



> > RW



> > Ground



> > 5



> >



> > Vss



> > Ground



> > 1



> >



> > Vdd



> > +5 Volt



> > 2



> >



> > Vo



> > 0-5 Volt



> > 3



> >



> > This leaves PORTB.1 and PORTB.0 and PORTD for other purposes.



> >



> > You can change these pin settings from the Options LCD menu.



> >



> > BASCOM supports many statements to control the LCD-display.



> >



> > For those who want to have more control of the example below shows how to



> > use the internal BASCOM routines.



> >



> > $ASM



> >



> > Ldi _temp1, 5 'load register R24 with value



> >



> > Rcall _Lcd_control 'it is a control value to control the display



> >



> > Ldi _temp1,65 'load register with new value (letter A)



> >



> > Rcall _Write_lcd 'write it to the LCD-display



> >



> > $END ASM



> >



> > Note that _lcd_control and _write_lcd are assembler subroutines which can



> > be called from BASCOM.



> >



> > See the manufacturer's details from your LCD display and for the correct



> > pin assignment for your exact microprocessor.



> >



> >



> >



>



>



>



>



>



>









Did you do a Google search? I come up with hundreds of things ...

Zack

On Sat, Jun 12, 2010 at 11:38 PM, raj wrote:

> Pls let us know some good development tool for 8051 micro which is freely
> available on net.
>
> Regrads
> raj
>
> On Fri, 11 Jun 2010 09:44:06 +0530 wrote
> >I hope some of the suggestions helped you. What kind of display are you
>
> working with?
>
> Zack
>
> On Thu, Jun 10, 2010 at 11:07 PM, sajjad torkan wrote:
>
> > > > thank you very much.
>
> > > --- On Wed, 6/9/10, Zack Widup
>
> > wrote:
>
> > > From: Zack Widup
>
> > Subject: Re: [AVR club] RE lcd
>
> > To: a... > Date: Wednesday, June 9, 2010, 11:28 AM
>
> > > > There are two types of LCD displays available. One is the raw LCD display
> > itself, which would require the proper display drivers and you'd have to
> do
>
> > all the firmware to generate characters yourself.
>
> > > The other is the LCD with the controller attached. These are much easier
> to
>
> > use and I suspect what you're referring to below.
>
> > > If you're referring to the original posting by s...@yahoo.com,
> > we
>
> > don't even know what he had in mind. Is it the first or the second type?
> If
>
> > the second, how many rows and characters does it display? What is the
>
> > controller chip?
>
> > > Until we know that, we really can't offer any help.
>
> > > Zack
>
> > > On Mon, Jun 7, 2010 at 6:13 PM, Captain Impala >wrote:
>
> > > > > > > > Below is a copy/paste from the Bascom AVR manual.
>
> > > > > Attaching an LCD Display, with bascom avr.
>
> > > > > A LCD display can be connected with two methods.
>
> > > > > By wiring the LCD-pins to the processor port pins. This is the pin
>
> > mode.
>
> > > The advantage is that you can choose the pins and that they don't have
> to
>
> > be
>
> > > on the same port. This can make your PCB design simple. The
> disadvantage
>
> > is
>
> > > that more code is needed.
>
> > > > > By attaching the LCD-data pins to the data bus. This is convenient
> when
>
> > > you have an external RAM chip and will add only a little extra code.
>
> > > > > The LCD-display can be connected in PIN mode as follows:
>
> > > > > LCD DISPLAY
>
> > > PORT
>
> > > PIN
>
> > > > > DB7
>
> > > PORTB.7
>
> > > 14
>
> > > > > DB6
>
> > > PORTB.6
>
> > > 13
>
> > > > > DB5
>
> > > PORTB.5
>
> > > 12
>
> > > > > DB4
>
> > > PORTB.4
>
> > > 11
>
> > > > > E
>
> > > PORTB.3
>
> > > 6
>
> > > > > RS
>
> > > PORTB.2
>
> > > 4
>
> > > > > RW
>
> > > Ground
>
> > > 5
>
> > > > > Vss
>
> > > Ground
>
> > > 1
>
> > > > > Vdd
>
> > > +5 Volt
>
> > > 2
>
> > > > > Vo
>
> > > 0-5 Volt
>
> > > 3
>
> > > > > This leaves PORTB.1 and PORTB.0 and PORTD for other purposes.
>
> > > > > You can change these pin settings from the Options LCD menu.
>
> > > > > BASCOM supports many statements to control the LCD-display.
>
> > > > > For those who want to have more control of the example below shows how
> to
>
> > > use the internal BASCOM routines.
>
> > > > > $ASM
>
> > > > > Ldi _temp1, 5 'load register R24 with value
>
> > > > > Rcall _Lcd_control 'it is a control value to control the display
>
> > > > > Ldi _temp1,65 'load register with new value (letter A)
>
> > > > > Rcall _Write_lcd 'write it to the LCD-display
>
> > > > > $END ASM
>
> > > > > Note that _lcd_control and _write_lcd are assembler subroutines which
> can
>
> > > be called from BASCOM.
>
> > > > > See the manufacturer's details from your LCD display and for the
> correct
>
> > > pin assignment for your exact microprocessor.
>
> > > > > > > > >
>
> > >
>
> > >
>
>
>
>


--- In a..., "raj" wrote:
>
> Pls let us know some good development tool for 8051 micro which is freely available on net.
>
> Regrads
> raj

WINAVR and AVRISP mkII are the best tools around.

don
PS: Why are you stuck on 8051 ??

NO, please don't answer that !!!!

Well, this IS an AVR group.
:-)

Zack

On Mon, Jun 14, 2010 at 5:56 PM, Donald H wrote:

> --- In a... , "raj"
> wrote:
> >
> > Pls let us know some good development tool for 8051 micro which is freely
> available on net.
> >
> > Regrads
> > raj
>
> WINAVR and AVRISP mkII are the best tools around.
>
> don
>
> PS: Why are you stuck on 8051 ??
>
> NO, please don't answer that !!!!
>
>
>