BX-24 vs BasicStamp

Started by Don Kinzer April 22, 2004
I've been wondering why the BasicStamp seems to be more popular than
the BX-24. Perhaps it's not but some superficial evidence is that
the basicstamps Yahoo group has about three times as many members as
this one and has activity roughly in the same proportion.

Does anybody have any ballpark idea of the number of Stamps out there
versus BX-24 (or the Atom, etc.)?

I can't figure out why anyone who's just getting started would choose
the Stamp over the BX-24. The Stamp, even in it most powerful form,
has a raft limitations and shortcomings compared to the BX-24:
archaic language, slower execution speed, extremely limited RAM,
small program space (partially ameliorated in the higher end Stamps
with a clunky paging scheme), no real math...

So what is it? Better marketing, better PR, being there first, dumb
luck?

By the way, I have seen that Radio Shack had a pilot program to sell
Stamp "Board of Education" kits. The scuttlebut is that the pilot
went well and they're planning a more significant roll-out shortly.
it also sounds like the Stamp is being used in quite a few college
and tech school courses. Too bad, that.

Don
who confesses to having built a project using the Stamp2 but now uses
the BX-24 instead.



So what is it? Better marketing, better PR, being there first, dumb
luck? A bit of all those Don. Their advertising is certainly well
done, and they have a good range of bits and peices and free handouts,
dbooklets etc which do appeal to the first time user. I also like you,
have to admit that I used a stamp first off, and had never heard of the
bx24, until I needeed to do some maths that the stamp could not do. It
was Peter who suggested the BX24.
neil Don Kinzer wrote:

> I've been wondering why the BasicStamp seems to be more popular than
> the BX-24. Perhaps it's not but some superficial evidence is that
> the basicstamps Yahoo group has about three times as many members as
> this one and has activity roughly in the same proportion.
>
> Does anybody have any ballpark idea of the number of Stamps out there
> versus BX-24 (or the Atom, etc.)?
>
> I can't figure out why anyone who's just getting started would choose
> the Stamp over the BX-24. The Stamp, even in it most powerful form,
> has a raft limitations and shortcomings compared to the BX-24:
> archaic language, slower execution speed, extremely limited RAM,
> small program space (partially ameliorated in the higher end Stamps
> with a clunky paging scheme), no real math...
>
> So what is it? Better marketing, better PR, being there first, dumb
> luck?
>
> By the way, I have seen that Radio Shack had a pilot program to sell
> Stamp "Board of Education" kits. The scuttlebut is that the pilot
> went well and they're planning a more significant roll-out shortly.
> it also sounds like the Stamp is being used in quite a few college
> and tech school courses. Too bad, that.
>
> Don
> who confesses to having built a project using the Stamp2 but now uses
> the BX-24 instead. >
>
> *>.





--- In , Neil Jepsen <njepsen@i...> wrote:
> So what is it? Better marketing, better PR, being there first,
dumb
> luck? A bit of all those Don. Their advertising is certainly
well
> done, and they have a good range of bits and peices and free
handouts, I have migrated to the BX from the Stamp via the Atom. The latest
move was all to do with good floating point support, sensible comms
& an industrial temp version. I agree with Neil and perhaps if
Netmedia were to be a bit more active they could easily take a
greater market share.

Just out of interest I went back (today) to the basicX (I assume
this is Netmedia's) website and note that the news page has not been
updated since 9/4/2002, the customer apps page has not changed for
many months and the last update to the program environment download
was in August 2003. This lack of "movement" on the website does send
out the wrong message.

By contrast the Parallax website is bursting with up to date stuff
which keeps people coming back for more.

I would love to know how many people are using the Stamp, Atom and
BX.

Cheers

Pat



It might be just being there first. I bumped into it when friend showed
me. He was not a programmer and I was (am?).

It seemed that everything I wanted to do needed a faster stamp or more
i/o. I ran into Peter Anderson's site and learned about the BX-24 and
BX-35 and have never looked back.

That said, I am running out of RAM on the BX-35! How can one really do
multitasking with only 400 bytes of RAM? There is plenty of CPU power,
but not enough RAM to store what you can do with it. I already use the
block data class and persistent storage for as much as I can.

Bob Roos

On Thu, 22 Apr 2004 21:04:59 -0000, Don Kinzer <>
wrote:

> ...
> So what is it? Better marketing, better PR, being there first, dumb
> luck?
> ...
> Don
> who confesses to having built a project using the Stamp2 but now uses
> the BX-24 instead.



I was looking for a PC based scope and Parallax sells a device called
OptraScope. It is fairly simple and doesn't store data on the PC beyond a
screen image, but for $189 (with their course) it could help someone "see"
what's going on with those little electrons.

My point is that Parallax is promoting and selling. I too have wondered
how excited NetMedia is about their product since there has been limited
updates to the website.

BTW, I ordered a scope from LinkInstruments.com (50MHz, dual channel,
storage through the parallel port) They have a USB adapter available. I
will let you know how it works out if anyone is interested.

On Thu, 22 Apr 2004 21:55:44 -0000, dongle241 <>
wrote:

> --- In , Neil Jepsen <njepsen@i...> wrote:
>> So what is it? Better marketing, better PR, being there first,
> dumb
>> luck? A bit of all those Don. Their advertising is certainly
> well
>> done, and they have a good range of bits and peices and free
> handouts, > I have migrated to the BX from the Stamp via the Atom. The latest
> move was all to do with good floating point support, sensible comms
> & an industrial temp version. I agree with Neil and perhaps if
> Netmedia were to be a bit more active they could easily take a
> greater market share.
>
> Just out of interest I went back (today) to the basicX (I assume
> this is Netmedia's) website and note that the news page has not been
> updated since 9/4/2002, the customer apps page has not changed for
> many months and the last update to the program environment download
> was in August 2003. This lack of "movement" on the website does send
> out the wrong message.
>
> By contrast the Parallax website is bursting with up to date stuff
> which keeps people coming back for more.
>
> I would love to know how many people are using the Stamp, Atom and
> BX.
>
> Cheers
>
> Pat




> That said, I am running out of RAM on the BX-35! How can one really do
> multitasking with only 400 bytes of RAM? There is plenty of CPU power,
> but not enough RAM to store what you can do with it. I already use the
> block data class and persistent storage for as much as I can.

I'm having exactly the same problems as you Bob, The BX-24/35 chip range is IMHO, one of the best all round chips out there, But I am finding the lack of RAM a problem.
To get around the limited memory I'm considering switching to the BX-01 with a RAM sandwich to overcome this problem (the added advantage of doing this is also that you gain network access to other BX-01 chips, which means I can extend out the functionality of my project).

Steve ;-)
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Don,

Based on some ads I saw for Parallax, they claim to have sold more than 500,000 units!

Yes the stamp is a much less capable processor, but I can certainly tell you it's reliable!

Initially I started a project using the BX-24 because if it's capabilities. I purchased two units and I experienced some really strange problems. Eg. EEPROM died - had to return it to netmedia & when attempting to run the SAME code on two BX-24 the behavior was different.

Maybe I just happen to order 2 lemons, but that surely diminished my confidence in the reliability.

So I switched back to the trusty old Stamp!

Don Kinzer <> wrote:
I've been wondering why the BasicStamp seems to be more popular than
the BX-24. Perhaps it's not but some superficial evidence is that
the basicstamps Yahoo group has about three times as many members as
this one and has activity roughly in the same proportion.

Does anybody have any ballpark idea of the number of Stamps out there
versus BX-24 (or the Atom, etc.)?

I can't figure out why anyone who's just getting started would choose
the Stamp over the BX-24. The Stamp, even in it most powerful form,
has a raft limitations and shortcomings compared to the BX-24:
archaic language, slower execution speed, extremely limited RAM,
small program space (partially ameliorated in the higher end Stamps
with a clunky paging scheme), no real math...

So what is it? Better marketing, better PR, being there first, dumb
luck?

By the way, I have seen that Radio Shack had a pilot program to sell
Stamp "Board of Education" kits. The scuttlebut is that the pilot
went well and they're planning a more significant roll-out shortly.
it also sounds like the Stamp is being used in quite a few college
and tech school courses. Too bad, that.

Don
who confesses to having built a project using the Stamp2 but now uses
the BX-24 instead.

---------------------------------
Yahoo! Groups Links

To

---------------------------------



From: Neil Grey <>

> [...]
> when attempting to run the SAME code on
> two BX-24 the behavior was different.
> [...]

What behavior was different?

Any chance you could post the code? I'd be curious as to why this
would happen.

-- Frank Manning
-- NetMedia, Inc.


--- In , Neil Grey <neilgrey@y...> wrote:
> Don,
>
> Based on some ads I saw for Parallax, they claim to have sold more
than 500,000 units!
>
> Yes the stamp is a much less capable processor, but I can certainly
tell you it's reliable!
>
> Initially I started a project using the BX-24 because if it's
capabilities. I purchased two units and I experienced some really
strange problems. Eg. EEPROM died - had to return it to netmedia &
when attempting to run the SAME code on two BX-24 the behavior was
different.
>
> Maybe I just happen to order 2 lemons, but that surely diminished
my confidence in the reliability.
>
> So I switched back to the trusty old Stamp!

This has not been my experience over the past many years. And, I
would love to see the same program running differently on two BX24s.

Note that this kind of discussion actually happens on the BasicX
Group. If brought up on the Stamp list, you will receive a nastygram
and be unable to post.

But, if you must go back to the weaker Stamp, you might consider the
PICAXE ( http://www.picaxe.co.uk ) which in some respects is stronger
than the BS2 at about $7.00 to $10.00.

Peter H Anderson, http://www.phanderson.com/basicx/



Take the recent request for help with driving a relay.

It seems that Parallax does a better job of making this kind of info
available.

For example, the Google search: drive relay "basic stamp" transistor

yielded 202 hits, but the search using "basicx" in place of "basic Stamp"
gave 15. And the first one in the hit list had an example.

I like the BX-35 much better than the stamp -- especially because there is
nothing that can handle as much i/o and it is less expensive.