output to control higher-load components

Started by Michael Krause February 4, 2005

I need to control components (light bulb, speaker, solenoid) that
need more current than the basicx chip can deliver. I'm
looking a good interface, and I'm thinking of using relays, or i/o
modules, driven by external power supplies. Which is a good way to
go to, are there other methods, any preferred parts that go well with
the basicx chip?

Any input is highly appreciated.
Thanks,
-Michael



Re: output to control higher-load components
Re: output to control higher-load components
Re: output to control higher-load components
Re: output to control higher-load components
Re: output to control higher-load components
Check out the ULN2803A chip - gives you 500ma sink x 8 channels -
For higher loads check the TIP100 series chips for single lines

Art -----Original Message-----
From: Michael Krause [mailto:]
Sent: Fri 2/4/2005 1:25 PM
To:
Cc:
Subject: [BasicX] output to control higher-load components I need to control components (light bulb, speaker, solenoid) that
need more current than the basicx chip can deliver. I'm
looking a good interface, and I'm thinking of using relays, or i/o
modules, driven by external power supplies. Which is a good way to
go to, are there other methods, any preferred parts that go well with
the basicx chip?

Any input is highly appreciated.
Thanks,
-Michael

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I use ULN2803A darlington arrays for multiple "medium current" usage
where I would exceed the max current output of the 8535. They are 56
cents from Mouser. High current usage such as driving motors require
other solutions.

Mike

>I need to control components (light bulb, speaker, solenoid) that
>need more current than the basicx chip can deliver. I'm
>looking a good interface, and I'm thinking of using relays, or i/o
>modules, driven by external power supplies. Which is a good way to
>go to, are there other methods, any preferred parts that go well with
>the basicx chip?
>
>Any input is highly appreciated.
>Thanks,
>-Michael >





To drive motors, I'm using N-channel logic-level MOSFETs. The
processor pin is wired to the "gate" of the MOSFET, via a 1K
resistor. This switches the MOSFET on and allows current to flow
through the MOSFET ("source" is ground, "drain" is positive) You also
must have a large-value pull down resistor between the gate and
source. I use 100K. This prevents static electricity from turning the
MOSFET on. You can get MOSFETs rated for any amount of current.

For motors, I have this problem where the motor noise causes the
processor to reset. I haven't solved this problem yet. I don't guess
you would have this problem with a lamp though.

Nathan
--- In , "Michael Krause" <pistorum@y...> wrote:
>
> I need to control components (light bulb, speaker, solenoid) that
> need more current than the basicx chip can deliver. I'm
> looking a good interface, and I'm thinking of using relays, or i/o
> modules, driven by external power supplies. Which is a good way to
> go to, are there other methods, any preferred parts that go well
with
> the basicx chip?
>
> Any input is highly appreciated.
> Thanks,
> -Michael




Re: output to control higher-load components

Thanks to Nathan for the suggestion using MOSFETs. In the meantime I
found the LCDX from Netmedia, which could be an alternative, and
would save me some soldering and time. I wouldn't care much for the
LED display, but it also has a 12 V/0.5 A relay output, which
probably would do the trick.
Does anybody have good (or bad) experiences with this device?
Thanks,
Michael --- In , "nathanchronister"
<nathanchronister@y...> wrote:
>
>
> To drive motors, I'm using N-channel logic-level MOSFETs. The
> processor pin is wired to the "gate" of the MOSFET, via a 1K
> resistor. This switches the MOSFET on and allows current to flow
> through the MOSFET ("source" is ground, "drain" is positive) You
also
> must have a large-value pull down resistor between the gate and
> source. I use 100K. This prevents static electricity from turning
the
> MOSFET on. You can get MOSFETs rated for any amount of current.
>
> For motors, I have this problem where the motor noise causes the
> processor to reset. I haven't solved this problem yet. I don't
guess
> you would have this problem with a lamp though.
>
> Nathan >
> --- In , "Michael Krause" <pistorum@y...>
wrote:
> >
> > I need to control components (light bulb, speaker, solenoid) that
> > need more current than the basicx chip can deliver. I'm
> > looking a good interface, and I'm thinking of using relays, or
i/o
> > modules, driven by external power supplies. Which is a good way
to
> > go to, are there other methods, any preferred parts that go well
> with
> > the basicx chip?
> >
> > Any input is highly appreciated.
> > Thanks,
> > -Michael



The LCDX uses the ULN2003A for a driver for the output which is an older version of the ULN2803A - it sinks 500ma.
The LCDX device is ok (BX-35) but the documentation is VERY limited and for example the aux I/O EE1 EE2 dont seem to work. NetMedia claims its another pin number than the documentation but that doesn't seem to work either. There are really no output pins available to use that i can see that are not dedicated to the LCD & keypad input. The ULN2803A is very simple to use ... has supression diodes , input resistors etc on board. The documentation for the LCDX even gives you the hookup diagram. (They drive the inputs from a SPI serial to parallel chip - but from there its the same.

Art -----Original Message-----
From: Michael Krause [mailto:]
Sent: Sat 2/5/2005 3:04 PM
To:
Cc:
Subject: [BasicX] Re: output to control higher-load components Thanks to Nathan for the suggestion using MOSFETs. In the meantime I
found the LCDX from Netmedia, which could be an alternative, and
would save me some soldering and time. I wouldn't care much for the
LED display, but it also has a 12 V/0.5 A relay output, which
probably would do the trick.
Does anybody have good (or bad) experiences with this device?
Thanks,
Michael --- In , "nathanchronister"
<nathanchronister@y...> wrote:
>
>
> To drive motors, I'm using N-channel logic-level MOSFETs. The
> processor pin is wired to the "gate" of the MOSFET, via a 1K
> resistor. This switches the MOSFET on and allows current to flow
> through the MOSFET ("source" is ground, "drain" is positive) You
also
> must have a large-value pull down resistor between the gate and
> source. I use 100K. This prevents static electricity from turning
the
> MOSFET on. You can get MOSFETs rated for any amount of current.
>
> For motors, I have this problem where the motor noise causes the
> processor to reset. I haven't solved this problem yet. I don't
guess
> you would have this problem with a lamp though.
>
> Nathan >
> --- In , "Michael Krause" <pistorum@y...>
wrote:
> >
> > I need to control components (light bulb, speaker, solenoid) that
> > need more current than the basicx chip can deliver. I'm
> > looking a good interface, and I'm thinking of using relays, or
i/o
> > modules, driven by external power supplies. Which is a good way
to
> > go to, are there other methods, any preferred parts that go well
> with
> > the basicx chip?
> >
> > Any input is highly appreciated.
> > Thanks,
> > -Michael
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