My Relays have Arrived. Help!

Started by c04203420 October 20, 2005
I have just received my solid state relays.

http://uk.farnell.com/productimages/farnell/standard/42267572.jpg

The specs are:

Description: RELAY, SOLID STATE 4A; Voltage, load RMS min:24V;
Voltage, load RMS max:280V; Current, load:4A; Current, surge:85A;
Voltage, control DC min:3V; Voltage, control AC min:24V; Voltage,
control AC max:280V; Voltage, control DC max:32V; Output
type:Thyristor; Voltage, isolation:4000V; Current rating:4A; Current,
leakage:5mA; Current, surge single cycle:85A; I2t:30s; Temperature,
operating (a) max:100C; Temperature, operating (a) min:-40C;
Voltage, control pickup:3V; Voltage, dropout:1V

http://www.farnell.com/datasheets/39446.pdf Here is a picture of the device that I would like to switch on using
the bx-24.

http://82.38.211.154:8080/bx-24/DCP_1594.JPG

Here is a close up of the ballast.

http://82.38.211.154:8080/bx-24/DCP_1596.JPG

I couldn't find any information on the internet at all regarding this
ballast so i'll post what little info there is from close inspection
of the device.

AC/DC INPUT: 220-240v
INPUT FREQUENCY: 50-60Hz
INPUT CURRENT: 0.54a
POWER FACTOR>=0.97
OPERATING TEMP: -15 ....+50 C
SOFT START (PREHEATING)

Could someone please help me with this one. This is my first time
dealing with dangerous current so im a little on the reluctant side. I
also do not want to damage my precious little microcontroller. Could
someone explain to me what i will need to carry out this connectivity
in the safest possible manner.

Will i need an optoisolator thingy and if so please explain what one
is an how to use it. Also do i need one and if so what will be the
problem if i do not use one?

NOTE: the ssr fits snuggly into hood along side the horizontal of the
ballast. The lower side has a sufficiently large enough gap to house
the ssr.(If that helps).

Thanks in advance.

Marc.



the only protection you will need is to limit current into the control lines of the ssr. The device already has a 1K resistor in series with the LED. The device requires 2ma to turn on. I would recommend that you use a logic low signal to turn the ssr on. So you would attach the + side of the ssr to +5 and the other side to a resistor with the other side of the resistor going to the output signal pin you want to use. The resistor should be 1K in order to limit the current to a little over 2ma.

no - the SSR already has an optoisolator built-in

best regards, Steve Thatcher


> I have just received my solid state relays.

These are not the best choice since they are intended to be mounted in a
circuit board. The puck-style module would be better, I think.

Here are a few shots, in the group's Photos section, of the puck-style
package in a fluorescent fixture. Given room, you can do the same.

http://photos.groups.yahoo.com/group/basicx/lst?.dir=/Construction+Techniques/SSRs+in+enclosures&.src=gr&.order=&.view=t&.done=http%3a//briefcase.yahoo.com/ Tom



--- In basicx@basi..., Steve Thatcher <melamy@e...> wrote:
>
> the only protection you will need is to limit current[]
>

Thanks for that. What would be the best way to make contact with the
ssr control and output pins. They are very stubby. Will a drop of
solder be sufficient or are there more reliable methods to secure a
connection. Im particularly interested in how i will get a good
bonding on the output side.

Thanks in advance>
Marc.


there are two methods that come to mind

the first would be to tin the wire you use and wrap it around the pin, then solder that. Use electrical tape to insulate the posts from fingers.

the second would be to use a butt splice that has a 18 gauge wire capacity. The post you have is .25" long and .04" in diameter on the ssr. A butt splice should let you crimp onto the post and the crimp a wire on the other side of the splice. The posts would be insulated already this way.

best regards, Steve Thatcher

-----Original Message-----
From: c04203420 <c04203420@c042...>
Sent: Oct 20, 2005 10:54 AM
To: basicx@basi...
Subject: [BasicX] Re: My Relays have Arrived. Help!

--- In basicx@basi..., Steve Thatcher <melamy@e...> wrote:
>
> the only protection you will need is to limit current[]
>

Thanks for that. What would be the best way to make contact with the
ssr control and output pins. They are very stubby. Will a drop of
solder be sufficient or are there more reliable methods to secure a
connection. Im particularly interested in how i will get a good
bonding on the output side.

Thanks in advance>
Marc.
Yahoo! Groups Links



--- In basicx@basi..., Steve Thatcher <melamy@e...> wrote:
> Use electrical tape to insulate the posts from fingers.

If you have access to it, heat shrink tubing is a much better
alternative. You can sometimes shrink it with the heat of a soldering
iron (don't touch the iron to the tubing) but I usually use a heat
gun. The "paint stripper" type guns will work in a pinch.

> ... use a butt splice ...

These are not nearly as secure as soldering and are also more prone to
failure due to corrosion. That said, I sometimes use them but I
prefer the non-insulated ones and I go ahead and solder them. Again,
heat shrink tubing provides good insulation. You can use multiple
layers of the heat shrink for more insulating power.


I think i'll do a direct solder and then put some shrink tubing on
like you suggested.

Im also assuming that for a relay that will be switched on twice in a
24 hour period i will not require a heat sink attatched. Correct me if
im wrong.