Is this the end, my friends?

Started by Tom Becker October 27, 2007
There remain only a few days of the month but it looks like this is
the slowest month of activity in this group since the first few months
of its inception eight years ago (oddly, this month I've received more
private messages about BX-24 than have been posted here); perhaps this
is the age of modern processor, ah, maturity. Certainly not everyone
has moved to http://www.zbasic.net ; have they moved to other
architectures?

Truth be told, my current - now three-year - project started with
three BX-24s in it. It now has four processors, one of which remains
a BX-24, but its days are numbered as its demand approaches its
ability. Netmedia has talked of a new processor for some time,
apparently waiting for its compiler to be completed; that hasn't
happened so far, though, and as it has become necessary, I've adopted
ZBasic. Others?
Tom
Naaa, BasicZ Coding envirment sucks ass big time. Im still die hard Basic X 24 fan it works for every thing i need.

To: b...From: m...@gmail.comDate: Sat, 27 Oct 2007 14:19:29 -0400Subject: Re: [BasicX] Is this the end, my friends?

As much as I like my two BasicX microcontrollers I have to say for thehobbyist side using by BasicATOM is just easier! Now if you want speed andmemory you can't beat the BasicX...or so i thought. Unfortunatly who wouldwant a BasicX when for the same price you can get more memory and speed. Iknow I won't switch but to people who are just starting out with amicrocontroller if they actually compare which do you think they'll choose?On 10/27/07, Tom Becker wrote:>> There remain only a few days of the month but it looks like this is> the slowest month of activity in this group since the first few months> of its inception eight years ago (oddly, this month I've received more> private messages about BX-24 than have been posted here); perhaps this> is the age of modern processor, ah, maturity. Certainly not everyone> has moved to http://www.zbasic.net ; have they moved to other> architectures?>> Truth be told, my current - now three-year - project started with> three BX-24s in it. It now has four processors, one of which remains> a BX-24, but its days are numbered as its demand approaches its> ability. Netmedia has talked of a new processor for some time,> apparently waiting for its compiler to be completed; that hasn't> happened so far, though, and as it has become necessary, I've adopted> ZBasic. Others?>> Tom>> >

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As much as I like my two BasicX microcontrollers I have to say for the
hobbyist side using by BasicATOM is just easier! Now if you want speed and
memory you can't beat the BasicX...or so i thought. Unfortunatly who would
want a BasicX when for the same price you can get more memory and speed. I
know I won't switch but to people who are just starting out with a
microcontroller if they actually compare which do you think they'll choose?

On 10/27/07, Tom Becker wrote:
>
> There remain only a few days of the month but it looks like this is
> the slowest month of activity in this group since the first few months
> of its inception eight years ago (oddly, this month I've received more
> private messages about BX-24 than have been posted here); perhaps this
> is the age of modern processor, ah, maturity. Certainly not everyone
> has moved to http://www.zbasic.net ; have they moved to other
> architectures?
>
> Truth be told, my current - now three-year - project started with
> three BX-24s in it. It now has four processors, one of which remains
> a BX-24, but its days are numbered as its demand approaches its
> ability. Netmedia has talked of a new processor for some time,
> apparently waiting for its compiler to be completed; that hasn't
> happened so far, though, and as it has become necessary, I've adopted
> ZBasic. Others?
>
> Tom
>
Tom and others
I have to agree with Ken unfortunately. I've been
using the atmel chips recently, and programming with Bascom ( which
has its drwabacks) but the sheer speed and programming power of the
atmel devices is breathtaking cf the Bx24. As Ken says,there is more
effort required, and I've managed to lock myself out of a perefectly
good device a few times, but still learning. The BX24 still has its
place I think...its easy to get started and is still much better than
the closest competition such as the stamp and the Picaxe. It is still a
great learning tool and for the hobbyest does most of what they want.
But-for a serious project its really annoying to hit the wall on a
project in terms of lack of speed or memory or both.
neil
Ken Arck wrote:

> Well, I don't mean to demean the BasicX product but I abandoned it
> years ago. It was great for a one-off or hobbyist application I suppose
>
> But for $10, I can buy an Atmel AVR with 4 times the RAM, 4 times the
> EEPROM and 10 times the code space.
>
> Sure, it's a tad more interfacing effort but you can do a hell of a
> lot for the $40 saved over a BX-xx
>
> Ken
>
>
>
> 5:38 p.m.
>
>
Hello guys
As a contribution to the discussion, I'll say that I have used BX24 in professional applications with great success and that now I'm using it for educational purposes, following Chris Odom's book.
One of the things that keeps me linked to the BasicX is this forum... It helped me a lot in the development process and I SURE hope this forum will remain... Not only I clarified doubts about the bx24 as also about electronics, sensors, chips and related stuff .

David
----- Original Message -----
From: Tom Becker
To: b...
Sent: Saturday, October 27, 2007 4:45 PM
Subject: [BasicX] Is this the end, my friends?
There remain only a few days of the month but it looks like this is
the slowest month of activity in this group since the first few months
of its inception eight years ago (oddly, this month I've received more
private messages about BX-24 than have been posted here); perhaps this
is the age of modern processor, ah, maturity. Certainly not everyone
has moved to http://www.zbasic.net ; have they moved to other
architectures?

Truth be told, my current - now three-year - project started with
three BX-24s in it. It now has four processors, one of which remains
a BX-24, but its days are numbered as its demand approaches its
ability. Netmedia has talked of a new processor for some time,
apparently waiting for its compiler to be completed; that hasn't
happened so far, though, and as it has become necessary, I've adopted
ZBasic. Others?

Tom
I moved to the Zbasic.net devices when they first came out. It was the best thing I have done for a long time. Many times faster, more chip choices, EXCELLENT support both from the manufacturer and the user forum. Did I mention the speed?

I saw the negative remark about the development environment, I disagree! It took just a short time to get used to it... works great as far as I am concerned.

And for those that are using the BasicX, like I was, you can get started right away using the BasicX compatible mode. I got my program running quickly that way, and then it took a lot less time than I thought to use the advanced features of the native Zbasic mode.

There are also additional development boards that use the same Zbasic chips available from Oak Microsm so there is even more support from a second vendor.

Shortage of RAM was always a problem for me with BasicX devices. Much more available with Zbasic. How's 7.5K Bytes on the newest devices?

If the BX series does what you want, stay with it. In my opinion there is no comparison. The Zbasic devices even program faster!
Tom
-----Original Message-----
From: b... on behalf of David Sousa Mendes
Sent: Sat 10/27/2007 6:08 PM
To: b...
Cc:
Subject: Re: [BasicX] Is this the end, my friends?

Hello guys
As a contribution to the discussion, I'll say that I have used BX24 in professional applications with great success and that now I'm using it for educational purposes, following Chris Odom's book.
One of the things that keeps me linked to the BasicX is this forum... It helped me a lot in the development process and I SURE hope this forum will remain... Not only I clarified doubts about the bx24 as also about electronics, sensors, chips and related stuff .

David
----- Original Message -----
From: Tom Becker
To: b...
Sent: Saturday, October 27, 2007 4:45 PM
Subject: [BasicX] Is this the end, my friends?
There remain only a few days of the month but it looks like this is
the slowest month of activity in this group since the first few months
of its inception eight years ago (oddly, this month I've received more
private messages about BX-24 than have been posted here); perhaps this
is the age of modern processor, ah, maturity. Certainly not everyone
has moved to http://www.zbasic.net ; have they moved to other
architectures?

Truth be told, my current - now three-year - project started with
three BX-24s in it. It now has four processors, one of which remains
a BX-24, but its days are numbered as its demand approaches its
ability. Netmedia has talked of a new processor for some time,
apparently waiting for its compiler to be completed; that hasn't
happened so far, though, and as it has become necessary, I've adopted
ZBasic. Others?

Tom
Well, I don't mean to demean the BasicX product but I abandoned it
years ago. It was great for a one-off or hobbyist application I suppose

But for $10, I can buy an Atmel AVR with 4 times the RAM, 4 times the
EEPROM and 10 times the code space.

Sure, it's a tad more interfacing effort but you can do a hell of a
lot for the $40 saved over a BX-xx

Ken
Yes, ZBasic seems to have superceded the BX-24 in quality and
support. The support is excellent and the product has so much more
in features and clarity. I now have 8 ZXs compared to two BX-24s,
two BX-35s, and a BX-01.

The ZBasic documentation is very clear and complete with only a few
errors (e.g.,440cps is a musical A note, not C) whilst Netmedia has
seemed unable to ever revise and correct errors and omissions in the
original documents.

Nonetheless, Netmedia keeps its full page ad inside the front cover
of Nuts & Volts, while ZBasic doesn't seem to be spending much on
advertising at all. So, they seem to be trying to remain relevant.

Of course, the Parallax Propeller offer a whole different experience
that includes video synthesis, keyboard and mouse direct interface,
and audio synthesis. Then there are Rabbit, Arduino, and more.

Currently I am enjoying using a DSTINIm400 for a complete 1Mbyte Ran
webservers.

Time marches on.
Correction, I just got the latest Nuts & Volts issue and Netmedia no
longer is advertising in the front inside cover.
> Nonetheless, Netmedia keeps its full page ad inside the front cover
> of Nuts & Volts, while ZBasic doesn't seem to be spending much on
> advertising at all. So, they seem to be trying to remain relevant.
>
This seems to be a classic case of the 'not keeping up with the times'
syndrome.

It really is a shame, as NetMedia paved the way for many basic based
micros. I've always felt as if the people behind the BasicX story had
day jobs to attend to, hence the sometimes lacking manner in which
they conducted their business.

Although I've outgrown it myself, I do still think that the BasicX
family is a good starting point for beginners.

-Don

--- In b..., "G. Kramer Herzog" wrote:
>
> Correction, I just got the latest Nuts & Volts issue and Netmedia no
> longer is advertising in the front inside cover.
> > Nonetheless, Netmedia keeps its full page ad inside the front cover
> > of Nuts & Volts, while ZBasic doesn't seem to be spending much on
> > advertising at all. So, they seem to be trying to remain relevant.
>