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want to learn RTOS

Started by vishal July 19, 2004
Hi, 
Can anybody suggest me good rtos material.I have good amount of exp in
embedded software devp.I've never used any rtos so far.Something tht
will help me leverage my exp would be great
Thank u 
Vishal Patil
>Can anybody suggest me good rtos material.
There is the book "MicroC OS-II: The Real Time Kernel" by Jean Labrosse. It goes through the source code of an RTOS that the author wrote.
In article <49e69fb6.0407190028.556d8b0@posting.google.com>, 
vishalnospam@yahoo.co.in says...
> Hi, > Can anybody suggest me good rtos material.I have good amount of exp in > embedded software devp.I've never used any rtos so far.Something tht > will help me leverage my exp would be great > Thank u > Vishal Patil >
Try: http://www.freertos.org/implementation/
garykato@aol.com (Gary Kato) wrote in message news:<20040719043554.07314.00000095@mb-m15.aol.com>...
> >Can anybody suggest me good rtos material. > > There is the book "MicroC OS-II: The Real Time Kernel" by Jean Labrosse. It > goes through the source code of an RTOS that the author wrote.
Yeah he's right. uC-OS is the cheapest way for an individual to get his feet wet in RTOSes. As far as priorities, multithreading, multitasking, interprocess communication, etc. goes, RTOS concepts are closely familiar with Unix-like OSes (e.g. Minix, Linux). You can install these on a PC and play with the mechanisms mentioned in the previous sentence. In fact, from a programming point of view, the determinism that makes an RTOS an RTOS is usually transparent to the programmer for the most part, even to a device driver developer. (I might be wrong though, because i haven't touched an RTOS since 2002). Thus, it is more important to know OS concepts, which are applicable to 99% of your programming in an RTOS. -Mike
On 2004-07-19, Mike V. <valemike@yahoo.com> wrote:

>> There is the book "MicroC OS-II: The Real Time Kernel" by Jean >> Labrosse. It goes through the source code of an RTOS that the >> author wrote. > > Yeah he's right. uC-OS is the cheapest way for an individual to get > his feet wet in RTOSes.
There are cheaper alternatives (e.g. eCos) that don't even require you to purchase a book. That said, it's a good book and a good little OS. -- Grant Edwards grante Yow! Here I am at the flea at market but nobody is buying visi.com my urine sample bottles...
You could also try the RTEMS (free software):
	http://www.rtems.org
Best regards,
Jacek.
Yet another open-source RTOS 
http://www.shift-right.com/xmk
Ahem!

"Gary Kato" <garykato@aol.com> wrote in message
news:20040719043554.07314.00000095@mb-m15.aol.com...
> >Can anybody suggest me good rtos material. > > There is the book "MicroC OS-II: The Real Time Kernel" by Jean Labrosse.
It
> goes through the source code of an RTOS that the author wrote.
I think not. Labrosse may be fine *if you already understand something about RTOSs*, otherwise not, speaking as one who tried to use it to learn about RTOSs from scratch. If you want to get a solid foundation on OS principles, a book like Comer's "The Mount Xinu Approach " is a better bet, in my view. Dave Bardon, Avocet.
>
On 19 Jul 2004 01:28:30 -0700, vishalnospam@yahoo.co.in (vishal)
wrote:

>Hi, >Can anybody suggest me good rtos material.I have good amount of exp in >embedded software devp.I've never used any rtos so far.Something tht >will help me leverage my exp would be great >Thank u >Vishal Patil
Hi, For a good description of multi-threaded programming concepts used in most RTOSes, try "Multi-C" from MiX software. It is written in a tutorial style and includes full C Source for a Multi-threaded library based on coroutines. (Cooperative multi tasking). http://www.mixsoftware.com (Tracing through an example program using a source level debugger is quite interesting) Regards Anton Erasmus
On Tue, 20 Jul 2004 15:00:56 -0400, "Avocet Systems, Inc"
<david@avocetDELETETHISsystems.com> wrote:

>If you want to get a solid foundation on OS principles, a book like Comer's >"The Mount Xinu >Approach " is a better bet, in my view.
Sheesh, I didn't know that Dr. Comer had yet another Xinu book out. But I completely agree that Doug's books are probably the very best way to learn about operating systems, if you are new to the subject. Most operating system books presume a teacher is there to help out or just dive in and cover all of a range of broad subjects. Even Tanenbaum's books, which get into some practical details, are overburdened by the details of fabricating a fairly sophisticated O/S. In contract, Comer comes at things in surprisingly simple fashion and yet with very useful results for many. And it speaks well, I think, to those trying this for the first time. Jon