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Announcing MCU-resident software development environment for Freescale and Microchip MCUs,,,

Started by Unknown April 15, 2009
Hi all,

We've written an MCU-resident software development environment that we
call "StickOS" that includes an editor, transparent line-by-line BASIC
compiler, interactive debugger, performance profiler, and flash
filesystem.  We've ported it to almost a dozen MCUs (HCS08, HCS12,
ColdFire, and PIC32) in the hope of making simple embedded system
development easier for the casual user, and in particular, for high
school students.

If folks are interested, StickOS runs on a number of readily available
evaluation boards, as well as bare MCUs (i.e., it requires no off-MCU
resources), and full documentation and binary downloads are available
here: http://www.cpustick.com/downloads.htm

Once StickOS is flashed on the MCU, you can control the MCU from any
terminal emulator.  You can control the pins and peripherals of the
MCU both interactively and programmatically and the MCU can be set to
autorun its BASIC control program.  StickOS also supports easy
wireless connectivity between MCUs when they have SPI access to a
Freescale MC1320x wireless transceiver, and on selected MCUs also
supports USB Host Mode for trivial data logging to a USB flash drive.

Just as a simple example, to read an analog-to-digital converter
attached to, say, a potentiometer, in StickOS takes two statements
(the first statement declares a variable named "pot" and binds it to
pin an0 that is configured for use by the analog-to-digital converter,
and the second statement prints the value of the analog-to-digital
converter, in millivolts):

  dim pot as pin an0 for analog input
  print pot

StickOS recently won 2nd place in the Freescale JM Badge Board Design
Challenge: Can Your Badge Do This? contest.

We have a number of additional MCU ports in the works presently
(including STM32 and PIC24 -- each port takes between a day and a
week) and are always considering others, so feel free to suggest your
favorite platform to us; we're especially seeking educators who might
want to give it a try and give us feedback on how it works for them.

Thank you.

-- Rich


On Apr 15, 4:46=A0pm, rtesta...@gmail.com wrote:
> Hi all, > We have a number of additional MCU ports in the works presently > (including STM32 and PIC24 -- each port takes between a day and a > week) and are always considering others, so feel free to suggest your > favorite platform to us; we're especially seeking educators who might > want to give it a try and give us feedback on how it works for them.
Can I suggest the AVR32 - Atmel just released ones with 128K RAM, and HighSpeed USB, (128K-384KF) which I think are firsts in FLASH uC (as opposed to uP) The EVK1104 looks a useful (initial) target ? [Atmel:Samples of the AT32UC3A3 are available now. The devices are priced at US$4.41 for 10k units. The ATEVK1104 development kit is available now. The kit is priced for US$169.] -jg