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Better Embedded System Software Book & Blog Announcement

Started by Philip Koopman May 10, 2010
Better Embedded System Software
by: Philip Koopman, Ph.D.
    Carnegie Mellon University

This book distills the experience of more than 90 design reviews on real
embedded system products into a set of bite-size lessons learned in the
areas of software development process, requirements, architecture,
design, implementation, verification & validation, and critical system
properties. Each chapter describes an area that tends to be a problem in
embedded system design, symptoms that tend to indicate you need to make
changes, the risks of not fixing problems in this area, and concrete
ways to make your embedded system software better. Each of the 29
chapters is relatively self-sufficient, permitting developers with a
busy schedule to cherry-pick the best ideas to make their systems better
right away.

I have also started an accompanying blog at:
http://betterembsw.blogspot.com/
The blog discusses topics both within the scope of the book and beyond
it with posts expected twice per week.  It also has details about the
book including a complete table of contents in the initial blog posting.
I hope you find the information in the blog and the book useful.


Phil Koopman -- koopman@cmu.edu -- http://www.ece.cmu.edu/~koopman
> I have also started an accompanying blog at: > http://betterembsw.blogspot.com/
Really nice of you to have a "Report Abuse" button which directly includes a "spam" option. Leo Havm�ller.


On Tue, 11 May 2010, Leo Havm?ller wrote:

> Date: Tue, 11 May 2010 05:31:26 +0200 > From: Leo Havm?ller <rtxleh@nospam.nospam> > Newsgroups: comp.arch.embedded > Subject: Re: Better Embedded System Software Book & Blog Announcement > >> I have also started an accompanying blog at: >> http://betterembsw.blogspot.com/ > > Really nice of you to have a "Report Abuse" button which directly includes a > "spam" option. > > Leo Havm?ller. >
Hardly SPAM! Dr. Koopman is OT and has written/developed some seminal works in the area, including an early treatise on stack based architecture which remains a classic. I consider this link a public service to an interested audience. Rob Sciuk