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MPLAB and my WPR3 programmer

Started by Sonnich Jensen November 7, 2011
Hi all

I got a programmer named WPR3. It offers to program PIC16 and PIC12,
as well as some cards and EEPROMs.
I only need the PIC part.

It is an older type, which is directly controlled by the parallel
port, a type which should have been common at the time. Though I have
not found much on the net.

My basic problem is that my MPLAB will not use/accept it, and I dont
know where to get drivers, which mode to pick ets. MPLAB by default
offers MPLAB ICD2, MPLAB ICD3, PicKit3, AN851 Quick Programmer Beta
and Real Ice.

I use a labtop with a docking station. My LPT is on the docking
station

Any ideas?

WBR
Sonnich

On Nov 7, 7:24=A0pm, Sonnich Jensen <sonnichjen...@gmail.com> wrote:
> Hi all > > I got a programmer named WPR3. It offers to program PIC16 and PIC12, > as well as some cards and EEPROMs. > I only need the PIC part. > > It is an older type, which is directly controlled by the parallel > port, a type which should have been common at the time. Though I have > not found much on the net. > > My basic problem is that my MPLAB will not use/accept it, and I dont > know where to get drivers, which mode to pick ets. MPLAB by default > offers MPLAB ICD2, MPLAB ICD3, PicKit3, AN851 Quick Programmer Beta > and Real Ice. > > I use a labtop with a docking station. My LPT is on the docking > station > > Any ideas? > > WBR > Sonnich
Forgot to mention, that is has a serial port too. Could this be AN851? I cannot find much about that either.,,, S
On Nov 7, 7:24=A0pm, Sonnich Jensen <sonnichjen...@gmail.com> wrote:
> Hi all > > I got a programmer named WPR3. It offers to program PIC16 and PIC12, > as well as some cards and EEPROMs. > I only need the PIC part. > > It is an older type, which is directly controlled by the parallel > port, a type which should have been common at the time. Though I have > not found much on the net. > > My basic problem is that my MPLAB will not use/accept it, and I dont > know where to get drivers, which mode to pick ets. MPLAB by default > offers MPLAB ICD2, MPLAB ICD3, PicKit3, AN851 Quick Programmer Beta > and Real Ice. > > I use a labtop with a docking station. My LPT is on the docking > station > > Any ideas?
Use the programming s/w that came with the programmer? Most 3rd party programmers have their own s/w, you generate the hex file in MPLAB and then program the PIC using the 3rd party s/w.
On Nov 7, 8:12=A0pm, Rocky <robertg...@gmail.com> wrote:
> On Nov 7, 7:24=A0pm, Sonnich Jensen <sonnichjen...@gmail.com> wrote: > > > Hi all > > > I got a programmer named WPR3. It offers to program PIC16 and PIC12, > > as well as some cards and EEPROMs. > > I only need the PIC part. > > > It is an older type, which is directly controlled by the parallel > > port, a type which should have been common at the time. Though I have > > not found much on the net. > > > My basic problem is that my MPLAB will not use/accept it, and I dont > > know where to get drivers, which mode to pick ets. MPLAB by default > > offers MPLAB ICD2, MPLAB ICD3, PicKit3, AN851 Quick Programmer Beta > > and Real Ice. > > > I use a labtop with a docking station. My LPT is on the docking > > station > > > Any ideas? > > Use the programming s/w that came with the programmer? > Most 3rd party programmers have their own s/w, you generate the hex > file in MPLAB and then program the PIC using the 3rd party s/w.
Well.... there is none.... but it should be a standard that was common at the time. It is some 5+ years old.
On Nov 7, 11:32=A0am, Sonnich Jensen <sonnichjen...@gmail.com> wrote:
> On Nov 7, 8:12=A0pm, Rocky <robertg...@gmail.com> wrote: > > > > > > > On Nov 7, 7:24=A0pm, Sonnich Jensen <sonnichjen...@gmail.com> wrote: > > > > Hi all > > > > I got a programmer named WPR3. It offers to program PIC16 and PIC12, > > > as well as some cards and EEPROMs. > > > I only need the PIC part. > > > > It is an older type, which is directly controlled by the parallel > > > port, a type which should have been common at the time. Though I have > > > not found much on the net. > > > > My basic problem is that my MPLAB will not use/accept it, and I dont > > > know where to get drivers, which mode to pick ets. MPLAB by default > > > offers MPLAB ICD2, MPLAB ICD3, PicKit3, AN851 Quick Programmer Beta > > > and Real Ice. > > > > I use a labtop with a docking station. My LPT is on the docking > > > station > > > > Any ideas? > > > Use the programming s/w that came with the programmer? > > Most 3rd party programmers have their own s/w, you generate the hex > > file in MPLAB and then program the PIC using the 3rd party s/w. > > Well.... there is none.... but it should be a standard that was common > at the time.
Serial may be more common at that time.
> It is some 5+ years old.
USB was getting more popular at that time. If microchip didn't make the hardware, why do you think they have the software to support it?
Sonnich Jensen wrote:
> Hi all > > I got a programmer named WPR3.
(...)
> I use a labtop with a docking station. My LPT is on the docking > station
Does the LPT port work? http://www.computerhope.com/rdebug.htm#0 Open a terminal session and type: debug You will get a dash prompt on the screen: - Type d 40:0 F It will look like: -d 40:0 F This means "Please tell me the addresses of all the parallel and serial ports that are on this machine. Arrange them so that the COM ports are on the left and the parallel ports are on the right side of the screen. Just the first 16 addresses will be fine". The computer's response will look something like: 0040:0000 F8 03 F8 02 E8 03 E8 02 - 78 03 78 02 BC 03 Which means: "I see three parallel ports. Their addresses are: 378, 278 and 3BC at logical address LPT1, LPT2 and LPT3, respectively. I also see four serial ports. Their addresses are 3F8, 2F8 3E8 and 2E8 at logical addresses COM1, COM2, COM3 and COM4 respectively. When you are done with debug, type: q .. and then 'exit'. So: -q (Gives you your terminal back) > exit (dismisses the terminal) --Winston That will be very helpful. Beware that lots of early hardware vendors did not give you a choice and had LPT1 hard coded at 378! If your parallel port is at LPT3, your programmer software may not see it. --Winston
Sonnich Jensen <sonnichjensen@gmail.com> wrote:

>Hi all > >I got a programmer named WPR3. It offers to program PIC16 and PIC12, >as well as some cards and EEPROMs. >I only need the PIC part. > >It is an older type, which is directly controlled by the parallel >port, a type which should have been common at the time. Though I have >not found much on the net. > >My basic problem is that my MPLAB will not use/accept it, and I dont >know where to get drivers, which mode to pick ets. MPLAB by default >offers MPLAB ICD2, MPLAB ICD3, PicKit3, AN851 Quick Programmer Beta >and Real Ice. > >I use a labtop with a docking station. My LPT is on the docking >station > >Any ideas?
MPLAB is an attempt to dumb things down :-) The usual way embedded firmware is developed is to compile & link the program to produce a hex file (there are many formats but Intel and Motorola are most common). This hex file is loaded into the software that comes with a programmer. After that all you need to do is insert the chip in the programmer, select the device from the list with devices the programmer supports and click the 'program' button in the programmer's software. -- Failure does not prove something is impossible, failure simply indicates you are not using the right tools... nico@nctdevpuntnl (punt=.) --------------------------------------------------------------
On Nov 8, 3:06=A0pm, n...@puntnl.niks (Nico Coesel) wrote:
> Sonnich Jensen <sonnichjen...@gmail.com> wrote: > >Hi all > > >I got a programmer named WPR3. It offers to program PIC16 and PIC12, > >as well as some cards and EEPROMs. > >I only need the PIC part. > > >It is an older type, which is directly controlled by the parallel > >port, a type which should have been common at the time. Though I have > >not found much on the net. > > >My basic problem is that my MPLAB will not use/accept it, and I dont > >know where to get drivers, which mode to pick ets. MPLAB by default > >offers MPLAB ICD2, MPLAB ICD3, PicKit3, AN851 Quick Programmer Beta > >and Real Ice. > > >I use a labtop with a docking station. My LPT is on the docking > >station > > >Any ideas? > > MPLAB is an attempt to dumb things down :-) > > The usual way embedded firmware is developed is to compile & link the > program to produce a hex file (there are many formats but Intel and > Motorola are most common). This hex file is loaded into the software > that comes with a programmer. After that all you need to do is insert > the chip in the programmer, select the device from the list with > devices the programmer supports and click the 'program' button in the > programmer's software.
Well, I still need that software.... :)
On Nov 8, 5:06=A0am, n...@puntnl.niks (Nico Coesel) wrote:
> Sonnich Jensen <sonnichjen...@gmail.com> wrote: > >Hi all > > >I got a programmer named WPR3. It offers to program PIC16 and PIC12, > >as well as some cards and EEPROMs. > >I only need the PIC part. > > >It is an older type, which is directly controlled by the parallel > >port, a type which should have been common at the time. Though I have > >not found much on the net. > > >My basic problem is that my MPLAB will not use/accept it, and I dont > >know where to get drivers, which mode to pick ets. MPLAB by default > >offers MPLAB ICD2, MPLAB ICD3, PicKit3, AN851 Quick Programmer Beta > >and Real Ice. > > >I use a labtop with a docking station. My LPT is on the docking > >station > > >Any ideas? > > MPLAB is an attempt to dumb things down :-) > > The usual way embedded firmware is developed is to compile & link the > program to produce a hex file (there are many formats but Intel and > Motorola are most common). This hex file is loaded into the software > that comes with a programmer. After that all you need to do is insert > the chip in the programmer, select the device from the list with > devices the programmer supports and click the 'program' button in the > programmer's software.
Problem is that MPLAB needs to talk over the parallel bus. If Microchip did not make that programmer, it's unlikely to have any firmware for it. Even if they did, they are likely to migrate away from it. Of course, you can reverse engineering the protocols and DIY, but it might be cheaper (in time) to buy a Microchip supported programmer.
On Tue, 8 Nov 2011 07:46:49 -0800 (PST), linnix
<me@linnix.info-for.us> wrote:

>On Nov 8, 5:06&#2013266080;am, n...@puntnl.niks (Nico Coesel) wrote: >> Sonnich Jensen <sonnichjen...@gmail.com> wrote: >> >Hi all >> >> >I got a programmer named WPR3. It offers to program PIC16 and PIC12, >> >as well as some cards and EEPROMs. >> >I only need the PIC part. >> >> >It is an older type, which is directly controlled by the parallel >> >port, a type which should have been common at the time. Though I have >> >not found much on the net. >> >> >My basic problem is that my MPLAB will not use/accept it, and I dont >> >know where to get drivers, which mode to pick ets. MPLAB by default >> >offers MPLAB ICD2, MPLAB ICD3, PicKit3, AN851 Quick Programmer Beta >> >and Real Ice. >> >> >I use a labtop with a docking station. My LPT is on the docking >> >station >> >> >Any ideas? >> >> MPLAB is an attempt to dumb things down :-) >> >> The usual way embedded firmware is developed is to compile & link the >> program to produce a hex file (there are many formats but Intel and >> Motorola are most common). This hex file is loaded into the software >> that comes with a programmer. After that all you need to do is insert >> the chip in the programmer, select the device from the list with >> devices the programmer supports and click the 'program' button in the >> programmer's software. > >Problem is that MPLAB needs to talk over the parallel bus. If >Microchip did not make that programmer, it's unlikely to have any >firmware for it. Even if they did, they are likely to migrate away >from it. Of course, you can reverse engineering the protocols and >DIY, but it might be cheaper (in time) to buy a Microchip supported >programmer.
There is no reason (other than perhaps convenience of initial setup) to have a Microchip IDE supported programmer. The IDE (or command line tools) output a standard Intel hex file. The programmer software eats the hex file and sends it to the programmer, over parallel, USB, serial, whatever, which programs the chips. As it ever was. Development is another story, and anyone still doing burn and crash development needs to move to more modern methods.