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eCos or uClinux

Started by Ram Dagan March 15, 2004
Hello,

I need for a new project a free small OS for the Intel xScale architecture
(strong ARM) IOP80331.
I consider both eCos and uClinux and the driver requirement is minimal.
Can somone point out the highlights and lowlights of each of them with
recomandation e.g. learning curve, development tools, ports etc.

Thank,
Ram


> Hello, > > I need for a new project a free small OS for the Intel xScale architecture > (strong ARM) IOP80331. > I consider both eCos and uClinux and the driver requirement is minimal. > Can somone point out the highlights and lowlights of each of them with > recomandation e.g. learning curve, development tools, ports etc. > > Thank, > Ram >
Hi Ram, I'm no expert, just someone making the same decisions for the first time and a little disappointed that nobody with more experience has replied. Here's a couple of links I found interesting. http://www.linuxdevices.com/articles/AT3393503683.html // A lot of other interesting stuff at linuxdevices.com http://www.cotsjournalonline.com/pdfs/2003/04/COTS04_softerside.pdf Cheers, Alf alfkatz@remove.the.obvious.ieee.org --- Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free. Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com). Version: 6.0.601 / Virus Database: 382 - Release Date: 29/02/2004
"Ram Dagan" <ram_dagan@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:40558559@news.012.net.il...
> Hello, > > I need for a new project a free small OS for the Intel xScale architecture > (strong ARM) IOP80331. > I consider both eCos and uClinux and the driver requirement is minimal. > Can somone point out the highlights and lowlights of each of them with > recomandation e.g. learning curve, development tools, ports etc.
I'm no expert in this field, but here are my $0.02 worth Learning curve isn't that great if you're familiar with Linux. eCos has a Linux-compatible API so programming it shouldn't be too hard. eCos is a *real* RTOS for time-critical operations (i.e. controlling a nuclear powerplant or factory machinery or chemical plant). ucLinux is merely a patch to enable Linux to run on 'simpler' processors (with no MMU). Choosing therefore depends on the application. If it isn't a time-critical software then use uCLinux. Both systems run on normal x86 PC's so it's easy to test and use either of them.