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Low-cost low-pin count MCU with USB Host support

Started by pozz June 6, 2016
What do you suggest?

I found SAM D21 from Atmel. Any other manufacturer?
On Tue, 07 Jun 2016 00:00:48 +0200, pozz wrote:

> What do you suggest? > > I found SAM D21 from Atmel. Any other manufacturer?
Check NXP and ST. What does low pin-count mean to you? Less than 1000? Less than 100? Less than 10? -- Tim Wescott Wescott Design Services http://www.wescottdesign.com I'm looking for work -- see my website!
Il 07/06/2016 01:11, Tim Wescott ha scritto:
> On Tue, 07 Jun 2016 00:00:48 +0200, pozz wrote: > >> What do you suggest? >> >> I found SAM D21 from Atmel. Any other manufacturer? > > Check NXP and ST.
SAM D21 by Atmel is a Cortex-M0+ MCU. NXP and ST integrate USB Host/OTG support starting from Cortex-M3 only.
> What does low pin-count mean to you? Less than 1000? Less than 100? > Less than 10?
Smaller is better :-) Beside supply pins, USB pins, debug/programming pins I need maximum additional 5 pins.
Il giorno martedì 7 giugno 2016 09:04:03 UTC+2, pozz ha scritto:
> Il 07/06/2016 01:11, Tim Wescott ha scritto: > > On Tue, 07 Jun 2016 00:00:48 +0200, pozz wrote: > > > >> What do you suggest? > >> > >> I found SAM D21 from Atmel. Any other manufacturer? > > > > Check NXP and ST. > > SAM D21 by Atmel is a Cortex-M0+ MCU. > NXP and ST integrate USB Host/OTG support starting from Cortex-M3 only.
nope. Frescal...ehm.. NXP Kinetis have USB also from M0+, Check the KL series Bye Jack
On 2016-06-07, pozz <pozzugno@gmail.com> wrote:
> Il 07/06/2016 01:11, Tim Wescott ha scritto: >> On Tue, 07 Jun 2016 00:00:48 +0200, pozz wrote: >> >>> What do you suggest? >>> >>> I found SAM D21 from Atmel. Any other manufacturer? >> >> Check NXP and ST. > > SAM D21 by Atmel is a Cortex-M0+ MCU. > NXP and ST integrate USB Host/OTG support starting from Cortex-M3 only. > > >> What does low pin-count mean to you? Less than 1000? Less than 100? >> Less than 10? > > Smaller is better :-) > Beside supply pins, USB pins, debug/programming pins I need maximum > additional 5 pins. >
There's also the PIC32MX2xx range but it's a MIPS core, not an ARM core. Simon. -- Simon Clubley, clubley@remove_me.eisner.decus.org-Earth.UFP Microsoft: Bringing you 1980s technology to a 21st century world
Il 07/06/2016 14:49, Jack ha scritto:
 > Il giorno marted&igrave; 7 giugno 2016 09:04:03 UTC+2, pozz ha scritto:
 >> Il 07/06/2016 01:11, Tim Wescott ha scritto:
 >>> On Tue, 07 Jun 2016 00:00:48 +0200, pozz wrote:
 >>>
 >>>> What do you suggest?
 >>>>
 >>>> I found SAM D21 from Atmel. Any other manufacturer?
 >>>
 >>> Check NXP and ST.
 >>
 >> SAM D21 by Atmel is a Cortex-M0+ MCU.
 >> NXP and ST integrate USB Host/OTG support starting from Cortex-M3 only.
 >
 > nope.
 >
 > Frescal...ehm.. NXP Kinetis have USB also from M0+, Check the KL series

You are right, I missed Kinetis MCUs on NXP website.
They seem cheaper than Atmel SAM D21 MCUs.

Thank you for your suggestion.

Xmega is interesting too, and cheaper than SAM.
8 bit CPU, but rich and powerful peripherals.  I've been using it
 recently and it's quite nice.

By the way, just a quick warning: "Full speed" USB2.0 is not
 actually full speed but only 12Mbps.  I got caught out by this at
 first.
-- 
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http://usenet.sinaapp.com/
On 2016-06-14, Espo <spam@spam.com> wrote:
> Xmega is interesting too, and cheaper than SAM. > 8 bit CPU, but rich and powerful peripherals. I've been using it > recently and it's quite nice. > > By the way, just a quick warning: "Full speed" USB2.0 is not > actually full speed but only 12Mbps. I got caught out by this at > first.
Yes, that can be confusing if you are not used to the fact the USB standards group redefined the meaning of the word "full" in the presence of 480Mbps USB. When the latter came along they called it high speed USB and kept the full speed description for 12Mbps USB. I remember comments at the time saying people would find it confusing. Simon. -- Simon Clubley, clubley@remove_me.eisner.decus.org-Earth.UFP Microsoft: Bringing you 1980s technology to a 21st century world
On 6/14/2016 2:09 PM, Simon Clubley wrote:
> On 2016-06-14, Espo <spam@spam.com> wrote: >> Xmega is interesting too, and cheaper than SAM. >> 8 bit CPU, but rich and powerful peripherals. I've been using it >> recently and it's quite nice. >> >> By the way, just a quick warning: "Full speed" USB2.0 is not >> actually full speed but only 12Mbps. I got caught out by this at >> first. > > Yes, that can be confusing if you are not used to the fact the USB > standards group redefined the meaning of the word "full" in the > presence of 480Mbps USB. When the latter came along they called it > high speed USB and kept the full speed description for 12Mbps USB. > > I remember comments at the time saying people would find it confusing.
Yeah, I found it confusing. But it is a name and names are not always descriptive. It would have been more confusing if they called 480 Mbps "full" speed. I suppose they could have given it some other name like "not quite full speed" or "a bit less than full speed". ;-) -- Rick C
Il 14/06/2016 13:39, Espo ha scritto:
> Xmega is interesting too, and cheaper than SAM. > 8 bit CPU, but rich and powerful peripherals. I've been using it > recently and it's quite nice. > > By the way, just a quick warning: "Full speed" USB2.0 is not > actually full speed but only 12Mbps. I got caught out by this at > first. >
It seems Xmega devices have only USB device, not host/OTG.