Forums

Anyone ever use a Jeteye IR with a PIC?

Started by Mark Bramwell June 29, 2005
A surplus store in our city is selling the "Jeteye PC" device for $1.

It appears to be a rs232 IR sender/receiver in a cute small package. I 
cracked it open and found 3 SMD chips, a crystal and a 2 bulb IR device 
(plus a few caps and transistors).

I looked up the chips with an online data sheet service. One of the chips is 
a 8 pin low dropout regulator.

The other 2 have me stumped:
(1) 7001   90B823
(2) TI 84D13RK  LV00

Ideally I would figure out where to tap the TTL levels so I could directly 
attach it to a PIC.

Has anyone played with these things?




-----  some more info I found; plus I metered the ports ------

The baud rate is selected by the DTR and RTS serial lines according to
the following:

Baud Rate       DTR - Pin 4     RTS - Pin 7
9600            0               1
19200           1               0
115200          1               1

After changing DTR and/or RTS to change the baud rate, allow 0.5
microseconds for the JetEye to stabilize before sending or receiving
data.

Do not select DTR=0 RTS=0, since this will power down the JetEye if it
is running with no transformer. The JetEye needs 100 milliseconds on
power up to stabilize.

Signal Assignments:
DCD - 1 - Not Used
Rx  - 2 - Data transmitted from JetEye to PC
Tx  - 3 - Data transmitted from PC to JetEye
DTR - 4 - Supplies power to the JetEye
GND - 5 - Signal Ground
DSR - 6 - Not Used
RTS - 7 - Supplies power to the JetEye
CTS - 8 - Not Used
RI  - 9 - Not Used

The JetEye supports only half-duplex operation. This is a characteristic
of infrared.


----

push on connector on the board

246
135

pins to db9

1=db5 (ground)
2=db4 (DTR - power)
3=db8 (CTS)
4=db3 (pc to jeteye)
5=db7 (RTS - power)
6=db2 (jeteye to pc)




Mark Bramwell wrote:
> A surplus store in our city is selling the "Jeteye PC" device for $1. > > It appears to be a rs232 IR sender/receiver in a cute small package. I > cracked it open and found 3 SMD chips, a crystal and a 2 bulb IR device > (plus a few caps and transistors). > > I looked up the chips with an online data sheet service. One of the chips is > a 8 pin low dropout regulator. > > The other 2 have me stumped: > (1) 7001 90B823 > (2) TI 84D13RK LV00 > > Ideally I would figure out where to tap the TTL levels so I could directly > attach it to a PIC. > > Has anyone played with these things?
Not I. But "7001" rang a bell from 20+ years ago. [from days when they started emulating 7400 parts in other processes] Tried a couple of Google searches. http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&lr=&biw=&q=%227001+%22+ic&btnG=Search turned up http://www.home.agilent.com/USeng/nav/-536893561.536885259/pd.html titled HSDL-7001 � IR 3/16 Encode/ Decode IC with 16X Clock Generator which stated The HSDL-7001 modulates and demodules electrical pulses from IrDA-compliant transceivers. It can be used with a microcontroller/microprocessor that has a serial communication interface (UART). The HSDL-7001 can be placed into the Internal Clock Mode or External Clock Mode. An external crystal is needed for the Internal Clock Mode. In applications where the external 16XCLK signal is provided, a crystal is not needed. There are two data transmission modes. Data can be transmitted and received in either a standard 3/16 modulation mode or a 1.63ms pulse mode. Might this be relevant? [ no luck searching TI 84D13RK ]
> >[snip other info]
That was a great find!

I was searching for the 2nd number thinking the 7001 was a 'house' number.

The last page of the PDF has an application note that shows how to hook it 
up to a microcontroller.
I'll give it a try, it even looks good for on top of a BOT.

I bought a few of them, I hope to use one as a remote PC connection to a 
hamradio that uses TTL serial for CAT control (instead of the standard 
max232 or ds275 solutions).


"Richard Owlett" <rowlett@atlascomm.net> wrote in message 
news:11c5unur0439o3d@corp.supernews.com...
> Mark Bramwell wrote: >> A surplus store in our city is selling the "Jeteye PC" device for $1. >> >> It appears to be a rs232 IR sender/receiver in a cute small package. I >> cracked it open and found 3 SMD chips, a crystal and a 2 bulb IR device >> (plus a few caps and transistors). >> >> I looked up the chips with an online data sheet service. One of the chips >> is a 8 pin low dropout regulator. >> >> The other 2 have me stumped: >> (1) 7001 90B823 >> (2) TI 84D13RK LV00 >> >> Ideally I would figure out where to tap the TTL levels so I could >> directly attach it to a PIC. >> >> Has anyone played with these things? > > Not I. But "7001" rang a bell from 20+ years ago. > [from days when they started emulating 7400 parts in other processes] > > Tried a couple of Google searches. > http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&lr=&biw=&q=%227001+%22+ic&btnG=Search > turned up > http://www.home.agilent.com/USeng/nav/-536893561.536885259/pd.html > titled > HSDL-7001 &#2013266103; IR 3/16 Encode/ Decode IC with 16X Clock Generator > which stated > > The HSDL-7001 modulates and demodules electrical pulses from > IrDA-compliant transceivers. It can be used with a > microcontroller/microprocessor that has a serial communication interface > (UART). > The HSDL-7001 can be placed into the Internal Clock Mode or External Clock > Mode. An external crystal is needed for the Internal Clock Mode. In > applications where the external 16XCLK signal is provided, a crystal is > not needed. > There are two data transmission modes. Data can be transmitted and > received in either a standard 3/16 modulation mode or a 1.63ms pulse mode. > > Might this be relevant? > > [ no luck searching TI 84D13RK ] > > > > > > >> [snip other info]