Forums

Extended temperature range microcontrollers?

Started by Unknown July 25, 2005
Hello embedded people!

We have a new project that may require operation at perhaps
105`C. This is well above what I am used to working with, so I have
not paid much attention to "extended" temperature range parts. Now I
need to find some!

I am looking for suggestions for microcontrollers. Would prefer
something modern and C (gcc) friendly, like e.g. the LPC2100 series I
was going to use...

Any ideas?

Thanks,

-- 

John Devereux
"John Devereux" <jdREMOVE@THISdevereux.me.uk> wrote in message
news:878xzu670x.fsf@cordelia.devereux.me.uk...
> Hello embedded people! > > We have a new project that may require operation at perhaps > 105`C. This is well above what I am used to working with, so I have > not paid much attention to "extended" temperature range parts. Now I > need to find some! > > I am looking for suggestions for microcontrollers. Would prefer > something modern and C (gcc) friendly, like e.g. the LPC2100 series I > was going to use... > > Any ideas? > > Thanks, > > -- > > John Devereux
Anything rated as "automotive" will do the job.. usually 125 degrees Celsius
John Devereux wrote:
> Hello embedded people! > > We have a new project that may require operation at perhaps > 105`C. This is well above what I am used to working with, so I have > not paid much attention to "extended" temperature range parts. Now I > need to find some! > > I am looking for suggestions for microcontrollers. Would prefer > something modern and C (gcc) friendly, like e.g. the LPC2100 series I > was going to use... > > Any ideas? > > Thanks,
Zilog have a lot of 105'C rated devices, and if you google for Automotive "ARM microcontroller" you get many hits... Philips have Automotive rated ARMs -jg
"John Devereux" <jdREMOVE@THISdevereux.me.uk> wrote in message
news:878xzu670x.fsf@cordelia.devereux.me.uk...
> Hello embedded people! > > We have a new project that may require operation at perhaps > 105`C. This is well above what I am used to working with, so I have > not paid much attention to "extended" temperature range parts. Now I > need to find some! > > I am looking for suggestions for microcontrollers. Would prefer > something modern and C (gcc) friendly, like e.g. the LPC2100 series I > was going to use... > > Any ideas? > > Thanks, >
Feescale 9S12X MC9S12XA512 with suffix VPV have -40..+105C and MPV -40...+125C working temperature range. r.
> -- > > John Devereux
John Devereux wrote:
>We have a new project that may require operation at perhaps >105`C. This is well above what I am used to working with, so I have >not paid much attention to "extended" temperature range parts. Now I >need to find some! > >I am looking for suggestions for microcontrollers. Would prefer >something modern and C (gcc) friendly, like e.g. the LPC2100 series I >was going to use...
Freescale (was motorola) do a lot of their microcontrollers in automotive spec (-40 to 125). What I/O requirements do you have for the project? Andy
Andy Sinclair <me@privacy.net> writes:

> John Devereux wrote: > >We have a new project that may require operation at perhaps > >105`C. This is well above what I am used to working with, so I have > >not paid much attention to "extended" temperature range parts. Now I > >need to find some! > > > >I am looking for suggestions for microcontrollers. Would prefer > >something modern and C (gcc) friendly, like e.g. the LPC2100 series I > >was going to use... > > Freescale (was motorola) do a lot of their microcontrollers in > automotive spec (-40 to 125).
Thanks, I will look into Freescale.
> What I/O requirements do you have for the project?
Not well defined at present - it depends how I partition the software and hardware, on- and off- chip functions. (Doesn't it always...). -- John Devereux
Jim Granville <no.spam@designtools.co.nz> writes:

> John Devereux wrote: > > Hello embedded people! > > We have a new project that may require operation at perhaps > > 105`C. This is well above what I am used to working with, so I have > > not paid much attention to "extended" temperature range parts. Now I > > need to find some! > > I am looking for suggestions for microcontrollers. Would prefer > > something modern and C (gcc) friendly, like e.g. the LPC2100 series I > > was going to use... > > Any ideas? > > Thanks, > > Zilog have a lot of 105'C rated devices, and if you google for > Automotive "ARM microcontroller" you get many hits...
Well I get lots of hits for microcontrollers for "automotive" applications, but most of these don't seem to mean for "automotive" *temperatures*!
> Philips have Automotive rated ARMs
I do see some 105`C parts that I missed before: LPC2194 and LPC2294. On reflection I think I need 115`C or 125`C (if such exist), since there will be a temperature differential between the inside and outside of the product :( Thanks, -- John Devereux
Hi John,

the LPC2294 and the LPC2194, which have the same block diagram except
the 2294 has an external bus, are both specified for -40/125C without
speed penalty, still full 60 MHz from Flash.

An Schwob

John Devereux wrote:
> Jim Granville <no.spam@designtools.co.nz> writes: > > > John Devereux wrote: > > > Hello embedded people! > > > We have a new project that may require operation at perhaps > > > 105`C. This is well above what I am used to working with, so I have > > > not paid much attention to "extended" temperature range parts. Now I > > > need to find some! > > > I am looking for suggestions for microcontrollers. Would prefer > > > something modern and C (gcc) friendly, like e.g. the LPC2100 series I > > > was going to use... > > > Any ideas? > > > Thanks, > > > > Zilog have a lot of 105'C rated devices, and if you google for > > Automotive "ARM microcontroller" you get many hits... > > Well I get lots of hits for microcontrollers for "automotive" > applications, but most of these don't seem to mean for "automotive" > *temperatures*! > > > Philips have Automotive rated ARMs > > I do see some 105`C parts that I missed before: LPC2194 and > LPC2294. On reflection I think I need 115`C or 125`C (if such exist), > since there will be a temperature differential between the inside and > outside of the product :( > > Thanks, > > -- > > John Devereux