Forums

RTOS

Started by Unknown February 10, 2006
Hi
I want to develop one IP Phone on some processor (other than pentium).
Now, the IP phone software  is very big and I want to embed this in my
chip. For this should I've to go for RTOS like uclinux etc, if so how
can I compile the source files. Should I've to install the RTOS in my
linux(FC4) and use the compilers in that. Also once I compile the
source files how can I port the RTOS in processor so that the code will
be running in my RTOS. Please clarify.
Prakash
ME Student

prakash.na@gmail.com wrote:

> Hi > I want to develop one IP Phone on some processor (other than pentium). > Now, the IP phone software is very big and I want to embed this in my > chip. For this should I've to go for RTOS like uclinux etc, if so how > can I compile the source files. Should I've to install the RTOS in my > linux(FC4) and use the compilers in that. Also once I compile the > source files how can I port the RTOS in processor so that the code will > be running in my RTOS. Please clarify. > Prakash > ME Student >
Usually when you run code on an embedded target you use a cross-compiler. This is a tool that runs on one processor and OS (like a PC running windows) and compiles code for another processor (like the processor you're using). It's really more than just a compiler -- it'll be compiler, linker, and loader/locator/whatever. Depending on how your target processor is configured its output may be anything from a complete hex image that boots and runs entirely by itself to an application 'executable' that needs to have a specific OS running on your target already. All of the embedded systems that I've worked with have been deeply embedded, and even the ones that had the capability to run separate programs have been shipped with a single stand-alone executable burned onto flash from a hex file. This can simplify things in many ways because you just have to use the RTOS, you don't have to become a sysop just to make your board come alive. In such an environment the RTOS becomes part of the source -- either as source code, or as binary object files that you incorporate into your product at link time. Given the level of experience that you seem to have I would strongly suggest that you find an RTOS/processor combination that's already ported and proven to work. If you can get an evaluation board for your target processor that comes with an RTOS, or an RTOS distribution that's already configured for _that specific_ board you'll be miles ahead. -- Tim Wescott Wescott Design Services http://www.wescottdesign.com Posting from Google? See http://cfaj.freeshell.org/google/
On Fri, 10 Feb 2006 10:01:37 -0800, Tim Wescott <tim@seemywebsite.com>
wrote:

>prakash.na@gmail.com wrote: > >> Hi >> I want to develop one IP Phone on some processor (other than pentium). >> Now, the IP phone software is very big and I want to embed this in my >> chip. For this should I've to go for RTOS like uclinux etc, if so how >> can I compile the source files. Should I've to install the RTOS in my >> linux(FC4) and use the compilers in that. Also once I compile the >> source files how can I port the RTOS in processor so that the code will >> be running in my RTOS. Please clarify. >> Prakash >> ME Student >> >Usually when you run code on an embedded target you use a >cross-compiler. This is a tool that runs on one processor and OS (like >a PC running windows) and compiles code for another processor (like the >processor you're using). It's really more than just a compiler -- it'll >be compiler, linker, and loader/locator/whatever. Depending on how your >target processor is configured its output may be anything from a >complete hex image that boots and runs entirely by itself to an >application 'executable' that needs to have a specific OS running on >your target already. > >All of the embedded systems that I've worked with have been deeply >embedded, and even the ones that had the capability to run separate >programs have been shipped with a single stand-alone executable burned >onto flash from a hex file. This can simplify things in many ways >because you just have to use the RTOS, you don't have to become a sysop >just to make your board come alive. > >In such an environment the RTOS becomes part of the source -- either as >source code, or as binary object files that you incorporate into your >product at link time.
^^^ Nice clear explaination of this... Thx.
> >Given the level of experience that you seem to have I would strongly >suggest that you find an RTOS/processor combination that's already >ported and proven to work. If you can get an evaluation board for your >target processor that comes with an RTOS, or an RTOS distribution that's >already configured for _that specific_ board you'll be miles ahead.