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ARM Cortex M3 - Who's utilizing it?

Started by diggerdo February 17, 2006
Trying to learn about the ARM Cortex M3
solution for low cost embedded market.

Their web site isn't much more than a shallow advertisement.
http://www.arm.com/products/CPUs/ARM_Cortex-M3.html

The "datasheet" is a two sheet sales flyer.
No mention of who is licensing and selling this core in chip form.

I need some help.

Anybody know who has implemented the ARM Cortex M3 core
in a chip available to the masses?






diggerdo wrote:
> Trying to learn about the ARM Cortex M3 > solution for low cost embedded market. > > Their web site isn't much more than a shallow advertisement. > http://www.arm.com/products/CPUs/ARM_Cortex-M3.html > > The "datasheet" is a two sheet sales flyer. > No mention of who is licensing and selling this core in chip form. > > I need some help. > > Anybody know who has implemented the ARM Cortex M3 core > in a chip available to the masses?
And exactly WHY do you want to use a chip which is hardly or not sold by anyone? -- Best Regards, Ulf Samuelsson ulf@a-t-m-e-l.com This message is intended to be my own personal view and it may or may not be shared by my employer Atmel Nordic AB
Ulf Samuelsson wrote:
> diggerdo wrote: >> Trying to learn about the ARM Cortex M3 >> solution for low cost embedded market. >> >> Their web site isn't much more than a shallow advertisement. >> http://www.arm.com/products/CPUs/ARM_Cortex-M3.html >> >> The "datasheet" is a two sheet sales flyer. >> No mention of who is licensing and selling this core in chip form. >> >> I need some help. >> >> Anybody know who has implemented the ARM Cortex M3 core >> in a chip available to the masses? > > And exactly WHY do you want to use a chip which is hardly or not sold by > anyone?
Not YET sold by anyone. It's the next generation ARM wave, and it will take a little while to see devices built around it. Same thing for the other variants (the A8 and future R derivatives). Ulf, we're waiting for the ARM Cortex vs AVR32 battle. :)
"diggerdo" <gotoit@dig.biz> wrote in message 
news:InpJf.57610$PL5.50520@newssvr11.news.prodigy.com...
> Trying to learn about the ARM Cortex M3 > solution for low cost embedded market. > > Their web site isn't much more than a shallow advertisement. > http://www.arm.com/products/CPUs/ARM_Cortex-M3.html > > The "datasheet" is a two sheet sales flyer. > No mention of who is licensing and selling this core in chip form. > > I need some help. > > Anybody know who has implemented the ARM Cortex M3 core > in a chip available to the masses?
Cortex-M3 isn't yet produced in volume, this will happen later this year. Test sillicon is available, and if you understand some Russian, you can become an alpha tester (http://supplier.ru/rus/news/?action=show&id=7). The first M3 development tools will be available in a few weeks. More Thumb-2 and v7-M architecture info should become public soon. Wilco
D. wrote:
> Ulf Samuelsson wrote: >> And exactly WHY do you want to use a chip which is hardly or not >> sold by anyone? > > Not YET sold by anyone. It's the next generation ARM wave, and it will > take a little while to see devices built around it. Same thing for the > other variants (the A8 and future R derivatives). >
Assuming it becomes an industry standard... Anyone remembering the Itanium? While the Cortex is probably an improvement over ARM, it may not be improvement enough to motivate people to pay millions of dollars. Think most semiconductor companies will adopt a wait and see. If needed, it can be licensed and introduced quickly. If not needed, noone will bother... One of the arguments for an ARM, is the second source. The first company to release a Cortex will not have a second source... It will compete with the coldfires, SH series etc.
> Ulf, we're waiting for the ARM Cortex vs AVR32 battle. :)
Doesn't look like there are Semiconductor companies in the official Cortex M3 list of licensees... T.I has licensed the Cortex-A8, but I think this is for Nokia and alike... The AVR32 seems to run at higher frequency and has an MMU so they may be focusing on different markets. -- Best Regards, Ulf Samuelsson ulf@a-t-m-e-l.com This message is intended to be my own personal view and it may or may not be shared by my employer Atmel Nordic AB
"Ulf Samuelsson" <ulf@a-t-m-e-l.com> wrote in message 
news:dt5c39$8g1$2@nntp.aioe.org...
> diggerdo wrote: >> Trying to learn about the ARM Cortex M3 >> solution for low cost embedded market. >> >> Their web site isn't much more than a shallow advertisement. >> http://www.arm.com/products/CPUs/ARM_Cortex-M3.html >> >> The "datasheet" is a two sheet sales flyer. >> No mention of who is licensing and selling this core in chip form. >> >> I need some help. >> >> Anybody know who has implemented the ARM Cortex M3 core >> in a chip available to the masses? > > And exactly WHY do you want to use a chip which is hardly or not sold by > anyone? > Ulf Samuelsson
If you have nothing to add, why bother to respond?
"D." <user@servet.net> wrote in message 
news:43f6614c$0$1596$c3e8da3@news.astraweb.com...
> Ulf Samuelsson wrote: >> diggerdo wrote: >>> Trying to learn about the ARM Cortex M3 >>> solution for low cost embedded market. >>> >>> Their web site isn't much more than a shallow advertisement. >>> http://www.arm.com/products/CPUs/ARM_Cortex-M3.html >>> >>> The "datasheet" is a two sheet sales flyer. >>> No mention of who is licensing and selling this core in chip form. >>> >>> I need some help. >>> >>> Anybody know who has implemented the ARM Cortex M3 core >>> in a chip available to the masses? >> >> And exactly WHY do you want to use a chip which is hardly or not sold by >> anyone? > > Not YET sold by anyone. It's the next generation ARM wave, and it will > take a little while to see devices built around it. Same thing for the > other variants (the A8 and future R derivatives). > > Ulf, we're waiting for the ARM Cortex vs AVR32 battle. :)
So Ulf comment was literally true. Seemed almost sarcastic. The M3 was announced two years ago in 2004. Why isn't it in production yet? Curious.
Wilco Dijkstra wrote:
> "diggerdo" <gotoit@dig.biz> wrote in message > news:InpJf.57610$PL5.50520@newssvr11.news.prodigy.com... > >>Trying to learn about the ARM Cortex M3 >>solution for low cost embedded market. >> >>Their web site isn't much more than a shallow advertisement. >>http://www.arm.com/products/CPUs/ARM_Cortex-M3.html >> >>The "datasheet" is a two sheet sales flyer. >>No mention of who is licensing and selling this core in chip form. >> >>I need some help. >> >>Anybody know who has implemented the ARM Cortex M3 core >>in a chip available to the masses? > > > Cortex-M3 isn't yet produced in volume, this will happen later this year. > Test sillicon is available, and if you understand some Russian, you can > become an alpha tester (http://supplier.ru/rus/news/?action=show&id=7).
Interesting - often useful info comes via .ru websites... I did wonder if Luminary Micro was going to use the Cortex Core. Since they are a brand new startup, it would seem most of the established ARM microcontroller vendors did NOT rush to embrace the Cortex M3. Hmmmm. According to the press, they will start the hoopla on March 6th. http://www.eet.com/news/semi/showArticle.jhtml?articleID=180203864 [Just remember, hoopla can preceed full commercial release by 12+ months] Still, a green core, plus a green startup, combined has more risks than many will tolerate. Be worth watching... 8-64KF, and 2-6KRam is now crowded space, they will need something in the peripherals to get attention. -jg
Ulf Samuelsson wrote:

> D. wrote: > >>Ulf Samuelsson wrote: >> >>>And exactly WHY do you want to use a chip which is hardly or not >>>sold by anyone? >> >>Not YET sold by anyone. It's the next generation ARM wave, and it will >>take a little while to see devices built around it. Same thing for the >>other variants (the A8 and future R derivatives). >> > > > Assuming it becomes an industry standard... > Anyone remembering the Itanium? > > While the Cortex is probably an improvement over ARM, > it may not be improvement enough > to motivate people to pay millions of dollars. > Think most semiconductor companies will adopt a wait and see. > If needed, it can be licensed and introduced quickly. > If not needed, noone will bother... > > One of the arguments for an ARM, is the second source. > The first company to release a Cortex will not have a second source... > It will compete with the coldfires, SH series etc.
plus the XC164,
> > >>Ulf, we're waiting for the ARM Cortex vs AVR32 battle. :) > > > Doesn't look like there are Semiconductor companies in the official Cortex > M3 list of licensees...
Yes, See also my other post, after Wilco's link. Looks like the only visible starter for M3, is a very green, startup company. - This is their first product...
> T.I has licensed the Cortex-A8, but I think this is for Nokia and alike... > The AVR32 seems to run at higher frequency and has an MMU > so they may be focusing on different markets.
I'd agree - if you look at the little that is mentioned on the upcomming devices, they mention 8-64K Flash, and 2-6K Ram - which is crowded space right now, and even somewhat outside the 32 bit sweetspot. ie : You don't really want to pitch where users are now, but where they WILL be on their next design. So the key to how well this goes, will NOT be the core, but the SW tools, the periherals, and if they have managed to run faster than most FLASH... -jg
"Ulf Samuelsson" <ulf@a-t-m-e-l.com> wrote in message 
news:dt5q6v$g3$1@nntp.aioe.org...
> D. wrote: >> Ulf Samuelsson wrote: >>> And exactly WHY do you want to use a chip which is hardly or not >>> sold by anyone? >> >> Not YET sold by anyone. It's the next generation ARM wave, and it will >> take a little while to see devices built around it. Same thing for the >> other variants (the A8 and future R derivatives). >> > Assuming it becomes an industry standard... > Anyone remembering the Itanium?
ARM already is the industry standard.
> While the Cortex is probably an improvement over ARM, > it may not be improvement enough > to motivate people to pay millions of dollars. > Think most semiconductor companies will adopt a wait and see. > If needed, it can be licensed and introduced quickly. > If not needed, noone will bother...
But if you wait too long, the market may be saturated...
> One of the arguments for an ARM, is the second source. > The first company to release a Cortex will not have a second source...
Any of the existing ARMs are of course second sources for any new ARMs (including Cortex) - that's the advantage of binary compatibility.
> It will compete with the coldfires, SH series etc.
Don't forget V850. The M3 outperformance those on all counts.
>> Ulf, we're waiting for the ARM Cortex vs AVR32 battle. :)
A new proprietary architecture... Anyone remembering the Itanium? :-)
> Doesn't look like there are Semiconductor companies in the official Cortex > M3 list of licensees...
Does STMicroelectronics qualify as a semiconductor?
> T.I has licensed the Cortex-A8, but I think this is for Nokia and alike... > The AVR32 seems to run at higher frequency and has an MMU > so they may be focusing on different markets.
Yes, the AVR32 is definitely not in the same market as the M3. It is an ARM11 + Jazelle + Thumb-2 clone, but because it is late (MIPS did it a few years ago), it now will have to compete with Cortex-A8. Ouch... Wilco