Forums

Microchip in Space

Started by Bill Giovino February 20, 2006
Microchip, in cooperation with NASA, has launched SuitSat-1, based on the PIC18
microcontroller.

Actually, it's a pretty cool embedded systems project...

http://Microcontroller.com/news/microchip_SuitSat1_NASA.asp

Regards,

Bill Giovino
Executive Editor
http://Microcontroller.com


Bill Giovino wrote:

> Microchip, in cooperation with NASA, has launched SuitSat-1, based on the > PIC18 microcontroller. > > Actually, it's a pretty cool embedded systems project... > >
Didn't it pack in after a few hours? Ian
"Ian Bell" <ruffrecords@yahoo.com> wrote in message 
news:dtd78f$hl0$1@slavica.ukpost.com...
> Bill Giovino wrote: > >> Microchip, in cooperation with NASA, has launched SuitSat-1, based on the >> PIC18 microcontroller. >> >> Actually, it's a pretty cool embedded systems project... >> >> > > Didn't it pack in after a few hours?
They thought so initially. 24 hours later some hams picked up a faint signal. Not sure how long it did last.
Bill Giovino wrote:
> Microchip, in cooperation with NASA, has launched SuitSat-1, based on the PIC18 > microcontroller. > > Actually, it's a pretty cool embedded systems project... > > http://Microcontroller.com/news/microchip_SuitSat1_NASA.asp
Since we're touting our space borne accomplishments, JK microsystems' uflashTCP has been flying on the International Space Station for 2-3 years controlling a sample refrigerator. A gas monitor for the ISS is currently under development using our Logicflex SBC.
"Ian Bell" <ruffrecords@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:dtd78f$hl0$1@slavica.ukpost.com...
> Bill Giovino wrote: > > > Microchip, in cooperation with NASA, has launched SuitSat-1, based on the > > PIC18 microcontroller. > > > > Actually, it's a pretty cool embedded systems project... > > > > > > Didn't it pack in after a few hours? > > Ian
Hi, Ian: Well, the batteries were supposed to be good for about three days. But as of last Friday, they were still going strong! -Bill.
In comp.arch.embedded Jim Stewart <jstewart@jkmicro.com> wrote:
>Bill Giovino wrote: >> Microchip, in cooperation with NASA, has launched SuitSat-1, based on the PIC18 >> microcontroller. >> >> Actually, it's a pretty cool embedded systems project... >> >> http://Microcontroller.com/news/microchip_SuitSat1_NASA.asp
>Since we're touting our space borne accomplishments, >JK microsystems' uflashTCP has been flying on the >International Space Station for 2-3 years controlling >a sample refrigerator. A gas monitor for the ISS >is currently under development using our Logicflex >SBC.
Any electronics in space have to withstand ionizing radiation without failing. To fly is easy, to work is another :), radiation toughness data would be useful.
pbdelete@spamnuke.ludd.luthdelete.se.invalid wrote:
> In comp.arch.embedded Jim Stewart <jstewart@jkmicro.com> wrote: > >>Bill Giovino wrote: >> >>>Microchip, in cooperation with NASA, has launched SuitSat-1, based on the PIC18 >>>microcontroller. >>> >>>Actually, it's a pretty cool embedded systems project... >>> >>>http://Microcontroller.com/news/microchip_SuitSat1_NASA.asp > > >>Since we're touting our space borne accomplishments, >>JK microsystems' uflashTCP has been flying on the >>International Space Station for 2-3 years controlling >>a sample refrigerator. A gas monitor for the ISS >>is currently under development using our Logicflex >>SBC. > > > Any electronics in space have to withstand ionizing radiation without failing. > To fly is easy, to work is another :), radiation toughness data would be > useful.
NASA did do some radiation tests on our SBC and it passed with a wide margin. I don't know the exact nature of the tests since our end user did them and not us.