Forums

Microcontroller Development Kit for hobby project

Started by Unknown December 6, 2006
akarui.tomodachi@gmail.com wrote:

> > Hi L: > Thanks for your prompt reply. > You are right (reference from your previous reply), I should have > better introduction of my "hobby project". > > Here is my VERY first project plan: > 1) To develop a program which will output to a LED display board > showing numbers one at a time (0 to 9). >
You have two differing specifications. VERY first project does not require USB. and 1) USB connectivity So, do you want a "hobby project" that will allow USB some time in the future ? All other spec's can be done with many off-the-shelf circuit boards, many different architectures. (PIC, 8051, AVR, ARM, MSP430) I would suggest finding a cpu chip with a USB interface built in and learn that "family". Starting with a smaller chip, i.e. without USB. When you are doing simple "0 to 9 displays", you can look at "1) USB connectivity". Good Luck donald
Donald wrote:
> akarui.tomodachi@gmail.com wrote: > >> >> Hi L: >> Thanks for your prompt reply. >> You are right (reference from your previous reply), I should have >> better introduction of my "hobby project". >> >> Here is my VERY first project plan: >> 1) To develop a program which will output to a LED display board >> showing numbers one at a time (0 to 9). >> > > You have two differing specifications. > > VERY first project does not require USB. > and > 1) USB connectivity > > So, do you want a "hobby project" that will allow USB some time in the > future ? > > All other spec's can be done with many off-the-shelf circuit boards, > many different architectures. (PIC, 8051, AVR, ARM, MSP430) > > I would suggest finding a cpu chip with a USB interface built in and > learn that "family". Starting with a smaller chip, i.e. without USB. > > When you are doing simple "0 to 9 displays", you can look at "1) USB > connectivity".
This can also mean "Connect via USB", and most of the lowest cost pathways these days, do exactly that. The Ez430, and SiLabs systems are USB_Stick type mini-development systems. The USB portion is essentially invisible to the designer: it provides the power, and the debug comms. -jg
Ethernet instead of USB....


http://www.netburner.com/products/development_kits/network_development.html

or

http://www.netburner.com/products/development_kits/network_development.html#kit_price

$99.00 for 32 bit ethernet attached hardware , RTOS TCP./IP stack and eclipse based development tools.

Paul
(CTO Netburner)
akarui.tomodachi@gmail.com wrote:
> I wanted to do some hobby projects and request your recommendation for > microcontroller development kit/board which should have included with > following features and parts. As this is my hobby project, my budget is > around US$100: > > 1) USB connectivity > 2) Firmware downloading thru serial (or USB) port (I don't have any ROM > burner) > 3) Some input switches or sensors > 4) Some output LEDs > 5) Power supply > 6) ANSI C compiler > etc. etc. > > Thanks in advance. >
Greetings, How much hardware are you able to make yourself (schematics, pcb etc) ? I ask because I was thinking about an AVR kit, but that needs a programmer that is easily made if you have the recources to manufacture such yourself. /Race
Jim Granville wrote:
> Donald wrote: > >> akarui.tomodachi@gmail.com wrote: >> >>> >>> Hi L: >>> Thanks for your prompt reply. >>> You are right (reference from your previous reply), I should have >>> better introduction of my "hobby project". >>> >>> Here is my VERY first project plan: >>> 1) To develop a program which will output to a LED display board >>> showing numbers one at a time (0 to 9). >>> >> >> You have two differing specifications. >> >> VERY first project does not require USB. >> and >> 1) USB connectivity >> >> So, do you want a "hobby project" that will allow USB some time in the >> future ? >> >> All other spec's can be done with many off-the-shelf circuit boards, >> many different architectures. (PIC, 8051, AVR, ARM, MSP430) >> >> I would suggest finding a cpu chip with a USB interface built in and >> learn that "family". Starting with a smaller chip, i.e. without USB. >> >> When you are doing simple "0 to 9 displays", you can look at "1) USB >> connectivity". > > > This can also mean "Connect via USB", and most of the lowest cost > pathways these days, do exactly that. > The Ez430, and SiLabs systems are USB_Stick type mini-development > systems. The USB portion is essentially invisible to the designer: it > provides the power, and the debug comms. > > -jg > >
You are very correct jg. I guess the OP needs to chime in and let us know what he really wants. donald
RaceMouse wrote:
> > Greetings, > > How much hardware are you able to make yourself (schematics, pcb etc) ? > > I ask because I was thinking about an AVR kit, but that needs a > programmer that is easily made if you have the recources to manufacture > such yourself.
The good news is that there are a lot of good choices around and very few rotten/bad these days. The AVR ICE-Cube at $40 from http://www.ecrostech.com/ solves both the device programmer and in-circuit emulation/debugging problems with AVR. Can (usually) bring up a new raw chip fresh out of the shipping tube with this tool. No need for a bootloader or other existing code in the chip. While you are at ECROS spend another $20 on the Butterfly Carrier (which includes prototyping space to play in), and $20 on an AVR Butterfly from Digi-Key. The Butterfly is practical to prototype on, then move your final design to a more appropriate AVR. Is much easier to move code between different AVRs than between Microchip PICs. An advantage of the AVR family is that there is a wide range of inexpensive parts in both SMT and DIP packages. Not all are available in multiple packages. Another advantage is that avr-gcc works extremely well on the AVR. A professional grade compiler for free that is not limited to Windows hosts. Many use avr-gcc on Linux, FreeBSD, and Macintosh. WinAVR brings gcc (and other tools) to Windows.