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Any uC manufacturers have free c compilers?

Started by The Real Andy November 25, 2007
I have been out of the design game for 5 odd years now. I would like
to do a few projects, but its not worth it if I have to spend
thousands on c compilers. I am too lazy to do assembler these days
(thats what PC programming does to you!) so asm is out. Looking for
small devices from atmel and zilog and the like. The last toughest
requirement is I use windows, so no linux. Any suggestions?
Hey Andy,

I'm not sure about Zilog parts, but I know the Atmel AVR series has a
GCC port. If you download AVR Studio from Atmel, and WinAVR (the GCC
port) the 2 work quite well together. Most of the traditional unix
stuff (makefiles etc) is hidden so it's very easy to use - more like a
MS IDE. You can buy a JTAG debugger/programmer for parts <=32kB for
around 60 AUD.

I've actually got a small pile of simple ATMEGA32 development boards
sitting here unused. If you want to go down the AVR route I'll happily
mail you one and some chips.

Cheers,

Al

On Nov 25, 7:43 pm, The Real Andy <thereala...@nospam.com> wrote:
> I have been out of the design game for 5 odd years now. I would like > to do a few projects, but its not worth it if I have to spend > thousands on c compilers. I am too lazy to do assembler these days > (thats what PC programming does to you!) so asm is out. Looking for > small devices from atmel and zilog and the like. The last toughest > requirement is I use windows, so no linux. Any suggestions?
> I've actually got a small pile of simple ATMEGA32 development boards > sitting here unused. If you want to go down the AVR route I'll happily > mail you one and some chips.
Actually, before I get 50 emails asking for one, this offer only applies to Andy. Sorry everyone else :) Al
On Nov 25, 6:03 pm, Al  Borowski <al.borow...@gmail.com> wrote:
> > I've actually got a small pile of simple ATMEGA32 development boards > > sitting here unused. If you want to go down the AVR route I'll happily > > mail you one and some chips. > > Actually, before I get 50 emails asking for one, this offer only > applies to Andy. Sorry everyone else :) > > Al
nah! thats not nice;-) goodluck to lucky Andy. ali
"The Real Andy" <therealandy@nospam.com> wrote in message 
news:engik31l5rbvl9pptr485feqts23jkq6sf@4ax.com...
>I have been out of the design game for 5 odd years now. I would like > to do a few projects, but its not worth it if I have to spend > thousands on c compilers. I am too lazy to do assembler these days > (thats what PC programming does to you!) so asm is out. Looking for > small devices from atmel and zilog and the like. The last toughest > requirement is I use windows, so no linux. Any suggestions?
In addition to the AVR suggestions already posted - Microchip have 'student and 'evaluation' editions of their compilers (8 16 and 32bit CPUs covered). Also there are many small ARM7 and Cortex M3 based devices with which GCC can always be used, plus code size limited versions of commercial ARM compilers. For an example see http://www.freertos.org/portLM3Sxxxx_Eclipse.html. -- Regards, Richard. + http://www.FreeRTOS.org 14 official architecture ports, 1000 downloads per week. + http://www.SafeRTOS.com Certified by T&#2013265948;V as meeting the requirements for safety related systems.
On Sunday 25 November 2007 10:43 The Real Andy wrote:

> I have been out of the design game for 5 odd years now. I would like > to do a few projects, but its not worth it if I have to spend > thousands on c compilers. I am too lazy to do assembler these days > (thats what PC programming does to you!) so asm is out. Looking for > small devices from atmel and zilog and the like. The last toughest > requirement is I use windows, so no linux. Any suggestions?
Fujitsu has a free C-compiler for their MB90Fxxx family. -- Reinhardt Behm, Bodenheim, Germany, reinhardt.behm@t-online.de
On Sun, 25 Nov 2007 02:09:21 -0800 (PST), I said, "Pick a card, any
card" and Ali <abdulrazaq@gmail.com> instead replied:

>On Nov 25, 6:03 pm, Al Borowski <al.borow...@gmail.com> wrote: >> > I've actually got a small pile of simple ATMEGA32 development boards >> > sitting here unused. If you want to go down the AVR route I'll happily >> > mail you one and some chips. >> >> Actually, before I get 50 emails asking for one, this offer only >> applies to Andy. Sorry everyone else :) >> >> Al > >nah! thats not nice;-)
http://cgi.ebay.com.au/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&rd=1&item=280175974081&ssPageName=STRK:MESE:IT&ih=018 -- Ray
On 2007-11-25, The Real Andy <therealandy@nospam.com> wrote:

> I have been out of the design game for 5 odd years now. I > would like to do a few projects, but its not worth it if I > have to spend thousands on c compilers. I am too lazy to do > assembler these days (thats what PC programming does to you!) > so asm is out. Looking for small devices from atmel and zilog > and the like. The last toughest requirement is I use windows, > so no linux. Any suggestions?
GCC is available for quite a few architectures: Atmel AVR and AVR32, Freescale 6812 and 68K, TI MSP430, Hitachi H8, and ARM based controllers from a half dozen different vendors. There's also a free C compiler (SDCC?) for the 8051 family, but I can't vouch for it. -- Grant
The r8c/m16c/m32c family is supported by GCC and, although I don't
have a windows build handy, it certainly does build there (I don't
have a linux build handy either, so there! ;)

You can also download eval versions of their tools from their web
site, including a programming tool.  I also have the programming
specs, and linux-based programmers.

You can also download free pre-built toolchains from kpitgnutools.com
The Real Andy wrote:
> I have been out of the design game for 5 odd years now. I would like > to do a few projects, but its not worth it if I have to spend > thousands on c compilers. I am too lazy to do assembler these days > (thats what PC programming does to you!) so asm is out. Looking for > small devices from atmel and zilog and the like. The last toughest > requirement is I use windows, so no linux. Any suggestions?
An engineer with one client had done some PIC16 projects with a compiler called C2C, and this compiler ... had some problems ... in the version he used. C2C has upgraded into a commercial product called BOOSTC, which costs about $150 per licence, and this one has been working quite decently for PIC16 and PIC18 projects. It doesn't cost thousands. Also check out the free Small Device C compiler (SDCC) for 8051 and a few others. Mel.