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Any uC manufacturers have free c compilers?

Started by The Real Andy November 25, 2007
The Real Andy <therealandy@nospam.com> writes:

> small devices from atmel and zilog and the like. The last toughest > requirement is I use windows, so no linux. Any suggestions?
I'm using linux as a development platform for Freescale Coldfire 52235, but the same gnu toolchain is available for Windows (even though I've never used it): http://www.codesourcery.com/gnu_toolchains/coldfire/download.html Petter -- A: Because it messes up the order in which people normally read text. Q: Why is top-posting such a bad thing? A: Top-posting. Q: What is the most annoying thing on usenet and in e-mail?
On 25/11/2007 The Real Andy wrote:

> I have been out of the design game for 5 odd years now. I would like > to do a few projects, but its not worth it if I have to spend > thousands on c compilers. I am too lazy to do assembler these days > (thats what PC programming does to you!) so asm is out. Looking for > small devices from atmel and zilog and the like. The last toughest > requirement is I use windows, so no linux. Any suggestions?
You don't have to spend $1000's. The Imagecraft tools start at USD199 and are available for AVR, ARM, MCP430 & CPU12. You can download a demo which is fully functional for 45 days and then becomes code limited, but will still be perfectly adequate for most hobby projects. http://www.imagecraft.com/ -- John B
On Sun, 25 Nov 2007 15:50:50 -0000, Grant Edwards <grante@visi.com>
wrote:

[snip...snip...]
>There's also a free C compiler (SDCC?) for the 8051 family, but >I can't vouch for it.
http://sdcc.sourceforge.net/ Originally 8051 parts but also targets Z80, HC08 and, somewhat, PIC 16 and 18 chips. Nothing fancy but it gets the job done. I've developed with it for Infineon C515C and Atmel AT89C51CC03 (both varieties use 8051-style cores).
On 2007-11-25, Grant Edwards <grante@visi.com> wrote:

>> I have been out of the design game for 5 odd years now. I >> would like to do a few projects, but its not worth it if I >> have to spend thousands on c compilers. I am too lazy to do >> assembler these days (thats what PC programming does to you!) >> so asm is out. Looking for small devices from atmel and zilog >> and the like. The last toughest requirement is I use windows, >> so no linux. Any suggestions? > > GCC is available for quite a few architectures: > > Atmel AVR and AVR32, Freescale 6812 and 68K, TI MSP430, Hitachi > H8, and ARM based controllers from a half dozen different > vendors. > > There's also a free C compiler (SDCC?) for the 8051 family, but > I can't vouch for it.
If you prefer a more "commercial" solution, I should have also mentioned that Rowley Crossworks is available for "personal" use for UKP75. They have suport for ARM, AVR, MSP430, and MaxQ: http://www.rowley.co.uk/ -- Grant
The Real Andy wrote:
> I have been out of the design game for 5 odd years now. I would like > to do a few projects, but its not worth it if I have to spend > thousands on c compilers. I am too lazy to do assembler these days > (thats what PC programming does to you!) so asm is out. Looking for > small devices from atmel and zilog and the like. The last toughest > requirement is I use windows, so no linux. Any suggestions?
Zilog has a free unlimited C compiler, available in their ZDS2 toolchain: http://www.zilog.com/software/zds2.asp It runs on Windows, fully supports their dev boards, and those boards cost very little. You should check them out, as they seem to fit your bill perfectly. Regards, D.
The Real Andy wrote:
> I have been out of the design game for 5 odd years now. I would like > to do a few projects, but its not worth it if I have to spend > thousands on c compilers. I am too lazy to do assembler these days > (thats what PC programming does to you!) so asm is out. Looking for > small devices from atmel and zilog and the like. The last toughest > requirement is I use windows, so no linux. Any suggestions?
It is probably better to ask who does not :) Most small parts have free compilers. Zilog are free across the whole range, Freescale are free up to a ceiling. Both these companies own Compiler companies. Atmel AVR8, AVR32 and C51 all also have free c compilers. You should also test the ICE pathways, that may matter more than the compilers. Easiest access to ICE in the C51 series is via SiLabs, who also have very good analog performance, and low power (and that can matter more than 'which core') Atmel have AVR studio Debug tools, but their ICE pathways are at the more expensive end of the scale. -jg
Grant Edwards <grante@visi.com> writes:
> > GCC is available for quite a few architectures: > > If you prefer a more "commercial" solution,
If you prefer GCC *and* commercial, you can have that too. Companies like kpitcummings and Red Hat (my job) sell support for gcc-based cross compilers.
DJ Delorie wrote:
> Grant Edwards <grante@visi.com> writes: >>> GCC is available for quite a few architectures: >> If you prefer a more "commercial" solution, > > If you prefer GCC *and* commercial, you can have that too. Companies > like kpitcummings and Red Hat (my job) sell support for gcc-based > cross compilers.
And CodeSourcery have gcc for ColdFire, ARM and MIPS - either as a free download, or a subscription version with Eclipse integration and support. As these guys are the maintainers for these gcc ports, you get the most cutting edge versions and their support people are extremely knowledgeable because they work on gcc. The same applies to Red Hat, although they work on different aspects of gcc. I can also recommend ImageCraft as a source of cheap, easy to use, and well-supported compilers for a number of targets.
On Sun, 25 Nov 2007 02:01:52 -0800 (PST), Al  Borowski
<al.borowski@gmail.com> wrote:

>Hey Andy, > >I'm not sure about Zilog parts, but I know the Atmel AVR series has a >GCC port. If you download AVR Studio from Atmel, and WinAVR (the GCC >port) the 2 work quite well together. Most of the traditional unix >stuff (makefiles etc) is hidden so it's very easy to use - more like a >MS IDE. You can buy a JTAG debugger/programmer for parts <=32kB for >around 60 AUD. > >I've actually got a small pile of simple ATMEGA32 development boards >sitting here unused. If you want to go down the AVR route I'll happily >mail you one and some chips. > >Cheers, > >Al > >On Nov 25, 7:43 pm, The Real Andy <thereala...@nospam.com> wrote: >> I have been out of the design game for 5 odd years now. I would like >> to do a few projects, but its not worth it if I have to spend >> thousands on c compilers. I am too lazy to do assembler these days >> (thats what PC programming does to you!) so asm is out. Looking for >> small devices from atmel and zilog and the like. The last toughest >> requirement is I use windows, so no linux. Any suggestions? >
Cheers Al. Will take a look at the Atmel parts. The zilog stuff looks like it has potential as well. In fact, I spotted a zilog part that might fit the bill perfectly. I want to do some 12V Batt charging/management for the boat and 4wd and I figure that I can roll it all into a single package. Might have a poke around the Atmel site and see what parts they have. Its a shame the Microchip stuff is so dear. I have an ICD2 as well lying around somewhere but I just cant justify spending US500 on the c compiler. Thanks everyone.
On Sun, 25 Nov 2007 19:43:25 +1000, The Real Andy <therealandy@nospam.com> wrote:

>I have been out of the design game for 5 odd years now. I would like >to do a few projects, but its not worth it if I have to spend >thousands on c compilers. I am too lazy to do assembler these days >(thats what PC programming does to you!) so asm is out. Looking for >small devices from atmel and zilog and the like. The last toughest >requirement is I use windows, so no linux. Any suggestions?
IAR do code-size limited versions of their compiler for AVR and ARM ( maybe others). Size limits are more than adequate for smaller parts (4K on AVR, 32K on ARM IIRC) Hi-Tech do a free version of theor compiler for the lower-end PICs. And there is GCC for a number of devices.