Forums

cortex programming in production

Started by coli...@yahoo.com February 29, 2008
Hi!

Does anyone know of a tool that will generate svf files (or something
simillar) for ARM cortex based micro's. I've actually got an STM32 but
which flavour of cortex shouldn't matter. This is the means by which a
production JTAG interconnection tester (JTAG technologies in this
instance) programs CPLDs, micro's or other simillar stuff.

At the moment we are just using an open source compiler to get a hex
file and downloading it with a raisonance RLINK but we're about to go
into pre-production and I can't find a solution.

rgrds

colin
On 29 Feb., 16:51, "colin_toog...@yahoo.com" <colin_toog...@yahoo.com>
wrote:
> Hi! > > Does anyone know of a tool that will generate svf files (or something > simillar) for ARM cortex based micro's. I've actually got an STM32 but > which flavour of cortex shouldn't matter. This is the means by which a > production JTAG interconnection tester (JTAG technologies in this > instance) programs CPLDs, micro's or other simillar stuff. > > At the moment we are just using an open source compiler to get a hex > file and downloading it with a raisonance RLINK but we're about to go > into pre-production and I can't find a solution. > > rgrds > > colin
SVF as programming file for ARM would be very unefficient as the SVF can no have polling loop, those all delay should be set to maximum. so you need either a production programmer or an in-house solution http://www.xiltendo.com/ there is handheld gameconsole used to program CPLDs, work is in progress for other devices as well (AVR, Actel FPGA, etc..) Antti
On 2 Mar, 14:18, Antti <Antti.Luk...@googlemail.com> wrote:
> On 29 Feb., 16:51, "colin_toog...@yahoo.com" <colin_toog...@yahoo.com> > wrote: > > > Hi! > > > Does anyone know of a tool that will generate svf files (or something > > simillar) for ARM cortex based micro's. I've actually got an STM32 but > > which flavour of cortex shouldn't matter. This is the means by which a > > production JTAG interconnection tester (JTAG technologies in this > > instance) programs CPLDs, micro's or other simillar stuff. > > > At the moment we are just using an open source compiler to get a hex > > file and downloading it with a raisonance RLINK but we're about to go > > into pre-production and I can't find a solution. > > > rgrds > > > colin > > SVF as programming file for ARM would be very unefficient as the SVF > can no have polling loop, those all delay should be set to maximum. > so you need either a production programmer or an in-house solution > > http://www.xiltendo.com/ > there is handheld gameconsole used to program CPLDs, work is in > progress for other devices as well (AVR, Actel FPGA, etc..) > > Antti
Antii Thanks for replying. I'm aware of the limitations of svf files, however they tend to be the lowest common denominator in this situation. As an aside, I looked at your Xiltendo some time ago. Are you aware that If you supported svf files, then you almost have yourself a production interconnect tester that the market pays silly money for? Colin
On 3 Mrz., 09:29, "colin_toog...@yahoo.com" <colin_toog...@yahoo.com>
wrote:
> On 2 Mar, 14:18, Antti <Antti.Luk...@googlemail.com> wrote: > > > > > On 29 Feb., 16:51, "colin_toog...@yahoo.com" <colin_toog...@yahoo.com> > > wrote: > > > > Hi! > > > > Does anyone know of a tool that will generate svf files (or something > > > simillar) for ARM cortex based micro's. I've actually got an STM32 but > > > which flavour of cortex shouldn't matter. This is the means by which a > > > production JTAG interconnection tester (JTAG technologies in this > > > instance) programs CPLDs, micro's or other simillar stuff. > > > > At the moment we are just using an open source compiler to get a hex > > > file and downloading it with a raisonance RLINK but we're about to go > > > into pre-production and I can't find a solution. > > > > rgrds > > > > colin > > > SVF as programming file for ARM would be very unefficient as the SVF > > can no have polling loop, those all delay should be set to maximum. > > so you need either a production programmer or an in-house solution > > >http://www.xiltendo.com/ > > there is handheld gameconsole used to program CPLDs, work is in > > progress for other devices as well (AVR, Actel FPGA, etc..) > > > Antti > > Antii > > Thanks for replying. > I'm aware of the limitations of svf files, however they tend to be the > lowest common denominator in this situation. > > As an aside, I looked at your Xiltendo some time ago. Are you aware > that If you supported svf files, then you almost have yourself a > production interconnect tester that the market pays silly money for? > > Colin
tell me more :) well I have currently ported only Xilinx XSVF player, but there is work in progress for 1) Actel DirectC (for PA3/Fusion programming) 2) AVR ISP (client is waiting) 3) Lattice ispVME/ispEmbedded - Lattice devices over JTAG or ser/par slave 4) generic STAPL/JAM player 5) others for generic SVF player (text file) I have not found good source code, but I havent done much homework either. optionally NDS can also run linux so some linux code could be used with little modifications as well. Antti
On 3 Mar, 10:11, Antti <Antti.Luk...@googlemail.com> wrote:
> On 3 Mrz., 09:29, "colin_toog...@yahoo.com" <colin_toog...@yahoo.com> > wrote: > > > > > On 2 Mar, 14:18, Antti <Antti.Luk...@googlemail.com> wrote: > > > > On 29 Feb., 16:51, "colin_toog...@yahoo.com" <colin_toog...@yahoo.com> > > > wrote: > > > > > Hi! > > > > > Does anyone know of a tool that will generate svf files (or something > > > > simillar) for ARM cortex based micro's. I've actually got an STM32 but > > > > which flavour of cortex shouldn't matter. This is the means by which a > > > > production JTAG interconnection tester (JTAG technologies in this > > > > instance) programs CPLDs, micro's or other simillar stuff. > > > > > At the moment we are just using an open source compiler to get a hex > > > > file and downloading it with a raisonance RLINK but we're about to go > > > > into pre-production and I can't find a solution. > > > > > rgrds > > > > > colin > > > > SVF as programming file for ARM would be very unefficient as the SVF > > > can no have polling loop, those all delay should be set to maximum. > > > so you need either a production programmer or an in-house solution > > > >http://www.xiltendo.com/ > > > there is handheld gameconsole used to program CPLDs, work is in > > > progress for other devices as well (AVR, Actel FPGA, etc..) > > > > Antti > > > Antii > > > Thanks for replying. > > I'm aware of the limitations of svf files, however they tend to be the > > lowest common denominator in this situation. > > > As an aside, I looked at your Xiltendo some time ago. Are you aware > > that If you supported svf files, then you almost have yourself a > > production interconnect tester that the market pays silly money for? > > > Colin > > tell me more :) > well I have currently ported only Xilinx XSVF player, but there is > work in progress for > > 1) Actel DirectC (for PA3/Fusion programming) > 2) AVR ISP (client is waiting) > 3) Lattice ispVME/ispEmbedded - Lattice devices over JTAG or ser/par > slave > 4) generic STAPL/JAM player > 5) others > > for generic SVF player (text file) I have not found good source code, > but I havent done much homework either. > optionally NDS can also run linux so some linux code could be used > with little modifications as well. > > Antti- Hide quoted text - > > - Show quoted text -
Antii I presume you know about interconnect testing in general. Software such as scanworks takes in the netlist and bsdl files and you tell it about resistors/buffers and even sdram. It then works out the shortest sequence for max test coverage and you run it in production and it tells you what any errors mean. Scanworks also allows you to record an SVF in much the same way as xilinx impact does. Recent tools allow an embedded micro to diagnose itself by running the svf and if the response is wrong it can send the response back to base for scanworks to work out what has failed. The cheapest scanworks station is about 7K pounds but all you really need is one station and several little boxes much like yours to run multiple test stations. Colin