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Luminary Cortex ARM toolchain thoughts?

Started by Spehro Pefhany April 25, 2008
Luminary offer the following options: 

1. ARM RealView� MDK tools
2. IAR Embedded Workbench� tools
3. CodeSourcery Sourcery G++ tools
4. Code Red Technologies Code Suite

What's likely to provide the best value for a few WinXP development
seats ? (the app will be using Ethernet heavily)

Best regards, 
Spehro Pefhany
-- 
"it's the network..."                          "The Journey is the reward"
speff@interlog.com             Info for manufacturers: http://www.trexon.com
Embedded software/hardware/analog  Info for designers:  http://www.speff.com
> 1. ARM RealView� MDK tools > 2. IAR Embedded Workbench� tools > 3. CodeSourcery Sourcery G++ tools > 4. Code Red Technologies Code Suite > > What's likely to provide the best value for a few WinXP development > seats ? (the app will be using Ethernet heavily)
I use all 4 :o) What 'value' are you looking for? I could rank them by price, but I don't think that would be very useful. IAR have a free code size limited version. Keil are owned by ARM, so should provide good tools. Code Red have excellent debug facilities (none intrusive trace, etc.) and the lowest price. I have used their tools extensively in the last month and have been pleased with the results. -- Regards, Richard. + http://www.FreeRTOS.org & http://www.FreeRTOS.org/shop 17 official architecture ports, more than 5000 downloads per month. + http://www.SafeRTOS.com Certified by T�V as meeting the requirements for safety related systems.
On Fri, 25 Apr 2008 21:03:50 GMT, "FreeRTOS.org" <noemail@given.com>
wrote:

>> 1. ARM RealView&#2013266094; MDK tools >> 2. IAR Embedded Workbench&#2013266094; tools >> 3. CodeSourcery Sourcery G++ tools >> 4. Code Red Technologies Code Suite >> >> What's likely to provide the best value for a few WinXP development >> seats ? (the app will be using Ethernet heavily) > > >I use all 4 :o)
Sounds like you might well have a useful perspective. ;-)
> What 'value' are you looking for? I could rank them by >price, but I don't think that would be very useful.
Well, purchase and maintenance cost *is* part of the equation, especially before any improvements over the current (free uChip C30) product is proven. As is learning curve. Given that we're starting with folks used to a WinXP/MPLAB environment with okay debugging features (when it works, which is not always), what's going to be the path of least resistance? Say we need to get a simple motion control app up and running with a bunch of TCP/IP Ethernet messaging (mostly UTP at present)?
>IAR have a free code size limited version.
Big enough for a TCP/IP stack and a useful program?
>Keil are owned by ARM, so should provide good tools.
Yes, and I don't see any pricing, so $$$$?
>Code Red have excellent debug facilities (none intrusive trace, etc.) and >the lowest price. I have used their tools extensively in the last month and >have been pleased with the results.
That does sound interesting. I see a price of $1K USD for their suite, is that right? Is Codesourcery more than that? Best regards, Spehro Pefhany -- "it's the network..." "The Journey is the reward" speff@interlog.com Info for manufacturers: http://www.trexon.com Embedded software/hardware/analog Info for designers: http://www.speff.com
>>IAR have a free code size limited version. > > Big enough for a TCP/IP stack and a useful program?
32K is quite generous. The FreeRTOS.org uIP demo fits into the code size limit, the lwIP demo does not. It is a clean professional tool.
>>Keil are owned by ARM, so should provide good tools. > > Yes, and I don't see any pricing, so $$$$? > >>Code Red have excellent debug facilities (none intrusive trace, etc.) and >>the lowest price. I have used their tools extensively in the last month >>and >>have been pleased with the results. > > That does sound interesting. I see a price of $1K USD for their suite, > is that right?
Yes. There are no restrictions on use (code size limits, etc.) when used with one of their low cost dev kits, so you can try it out for just a few $$$ by purchasing the dev kit. It is based on Eclipse, with their own fancy extensions, improvements and debug interface. The Eclipse IDE is not so clean and takes some getting used to. The source editor itself has lots of advanced features though. Eclipse is getting more and more popular in the embedded world so time invensted in learning to use it could be well spent.
>Is Codesourcery more than that?
Don't know. Code Red use the CodeSourcery compiler, so the compiler itself is the same. Take care on license models - if you get a quote make sure its a one time payment. -- Regards, Richard. + http://www.FreeRTOS.org & http://www.FreeRTOS.org/shop 17 official architecture ports, more than 5000 downloads per month. + http://www.SafeRTOS.com Certified by T&#2013265948;V as meeting the requirements for safety related systems.
On Apr 25, 3:59=A0pm, Spehro Pefhany <speffS...@interlogDOTyou.knowwhat>
wrote:
> Luminary offer the following options:
FWIW, CrossWorks also supports this target and I'm using it happily with an LM3S6965.
>> Luminary offer the following options:
>FWIW, CrossWorks also supports this target and I'm using it happily >with an LM3S6965.
Just for completeness http://www.rowley.co.uk (Used that lots too, very nice, clean, easy tool. Also uses the CodeSourcery compiler :o) -- Regards, Richard. + http://www.FreeRTOS.org & http://www.FreeRTOS.org/shop 17 official architecture ports, more than 5000 downloads per month. + http://www.SafeRTOS.com Certified by T&#2013265948;V as meeting the requirements for safety related systems.
FreeRTOS.org wrote:
>> Is Codesourcery more than that? > > Don't know. Code Red use the CodeSourcery compiler, so the compiler itself > is the same. Take care on license models - if you get a quote make sure its > a one time payment. >
CodeSourcery provide three options - a totally free download (of the compiler toolchain, library and debugger, including source), a "personal" edition ($400, including a year's worth of updates, which includes Eclipse integration and probably some closed source bits and pieces), and a "professional" edition (pricing not published, includes support). I don't know anything about Code Red, but it's worth noting that CodeSourcery are the official gcc maintainers for a number of target ports (ColdFire, ARM, MIPS, and possibly also PPC), so that's the road to choose if you want the latest and greatest, and you want support from the people that actually write the code. But for all I know, Code Red could have all sorts of other useful additions - I have no experience with them.
On Apr 26, 8:14=A0am, "FreeRTOS.org" <noem...@given.com> wrote:

> Just for completenesshttp://www.rowley.co.uk > > (Used that lots too, very nice, clean, easy tool. =A0Also uses the > CodeSourcery compiler :o)
AAMOI, what does Raisonance use? They benchmark slightly smaller than Rowley binaries (for a CM3 target).
"larwe" <zwsdotcom@gmail.com> wrote in message 
news:5f9543eb-c46c-4d3b-b4aa-dc69b743a8c5@b9g2000prh.googlegroups.com...
On Apr 26, 8:14 am, "FreeRTOS.org" <noem...@given.com> wrote:

>> Just for completenesshttp://www.rowley.co.uk >> >> (Used that lots too, very nice, clean, easy tool. Also uses the >> CodeSourcery compiler :o)
>AAMOI, what does Raisonance use? They benchmark slightly smaller than >Rowley binaries (for a CM3 target).
Yep - used that too. What am I doing with my life? Raisonance uses the arm-non-eabi CodeSourcery compiler too. I'm led to believe that there will be a new version out soon (if not already) that will improve code size quite considerably. -- Regards, Richard. + http://www.FreeRTOS.org & http://www.FreeRTOS.org/shop 17 official architecture ports, more than 5000 downloads per month. + http://www.SafeRTOS.com Certified by T&#2013265948;V as meeting the requirements for safety related systems.
"FreeRTOS.org" <noemail@given.com> writes:

> "larwe" <zwsdotcom@gmail.com> wrote in message > news:5f9543eb-c46c-4d3b-b4aa-dc69b743a8c5@b9g2000prh.googlegroups.com... > On Apr 26, 8:14 am, "FreeRTOS.org" <noem...@given.com> wrote: > >>> Just for completenesshttp://www.rowley.co.uk >>> >>> (Used that lots too, very nice, clean, easy tool. Also uses the >>> CodeSourcery compiler :o) > >>AAMOI, what does Raisonance use? They benchmark slightly smaller than >>Rowley binaries (for a CM3 target). > > Yep - used that too. What am I doing with my life? > > Raisonance uses the arm-non-eabi CodeSourcery compiler too. > > I'm led to believe that there will be a new version out soon (if not > already) that will improve code size quite considerably.
Hey, I just had a look and it is out! <http://www.codesourcery.com/gnu_toolchains/arm> -- John Devereux