Forums

Processors with remote programming / debugging

Started by Unknown July 9, 2008
Hello,
I am looking into potential embedded microprocessors to use for a one
time project.  About 2-3 units will be produced.  A good software
library and a solid product are more important than volume pricing.

- Remote programming and debugging is necessary.  This is a one time
project that will be installed in New Mexico (I am in NY), and I need
to be able to fix small glitches from home.  This should happen over
basic TCP/IP (not some crazy serial emulator I need to install
everywhere).  It is not practical to dedicate an entire computer
towards acting as the host for this.
- I am looking for a microcontroller that does not emit much heat.  It
will be enclosed in a unit that will be in surrounding temperatures of
100+ (New Mexico).
- I plan on analyzing the input from 2 cameras at a rate of 2 frames
per second.  So 2x2 =3D 4 frames per second.  A shadow tracking
algorithm will be applied to one of the images.  I am not sure how
computationally expensive this will be but I don=92t expect it to be
huge.
- Ethernet connection is necessary to upload images to a specified
location (TCP/IP and FTP protocol support would be great).
- Thread support (or the likes).  I don=92t want any network delays to
interrupt the image analysis.
- File storage is not a huge deal but the easier the better.  Any kind
of file system support would be great, as I will most likely dump
debugging information from time to time on the image algorithm.

Again this is low volume and time constrained, I=92d rather buy a lot of
pre-working parts.

Currently the best thing I have found is the rabbit processors with
the RabbitLink for remote debugging and programming.  There seem to be
various libraries for downloading images from cameras, etc.  Down side
is it is not ANSI C so I can not port code easily, and I hear it is a
little annoying.

Can anyone offer any alternatives?  I have seen quite a few options
but it seems like no one else offers TCP/IP based remote programming/
debugging.

Thank you kindly!
Lucas
<posted & mailed>

lucasvickers@gmail.com wrote:

> Hello, > I am looking into potential embedded microprocessors to use for a one > time project. About 2-3 units will be produced. A good software > library and a solid product are more important than volume pricing. > > - Remote programming and debugging is necessary. This is a one time > project that will be installed in New Mexico (I am in NY), and I need > to be able to fix small glitches from home. This should happen over > basic TCP/IP (not some crazy serial emulator I need to install > everywhere). It is not practical to dedicate an entire computer > towards acting as the host for this. > - I am looking for a microcontroller that does not emit much heat. It > will be enclosed in a unit that will be in surrounding temperatures of > 100+ (New Mexico). > - I plan on analyzing the input from 2 cameras at a rate of 2 frames > per second. So 2x2 = 4 frames per second. A shadow tracking > algorithm will be applied to one of the images. I am not sure how > computationally expensive this will be but I don?t expect it to be > huge. > - Ethernet connection is necessary to upload images to a specified > location (TCP/IP and FTP protocol support would be great). > - Thread support (or the likes). I don?t want any network delays to > interrupt the image analysis. > - File storage is not a huge deal but the easier the better. Any kind > of file system support would be great, as I will most likely dump > debugging information from time to time on the image algorithm. > > Again this is low volume and time constrained, I?d rather buy a lot of > pre-working parts. > > Currently the best thing I have found is the rabbit processors with > the RabbitLink for remote debugging and programming. There seem to be > various libraries for downloading images from cameras, etc. Down side > is it is not ANSI C so I can not port code easily, and I hear it is a > little annoying. > > Can anyone offer any alternatives? I have seen quite a few options > but it seems like no one else offers TCP/IP based remote programming/ > debugging. > > Thank you kindly! > Lucas
See MPE's site for a suitable board based product that you can add the frame grabber hardware to and which will likely fulfil all of your goals. -- ******************************************************************** Paul E. Bennett...............<email://Paul_E.Bennett@topmail.co.uk> Forth based HIDECS Consultancy Mob: +44 (0)7811-639972 Tel: +44 (0)1235-811095 Going Forth Safely ..... EBA. www.electric-boat-association.org.uk.. ********************************************************************
>Currently the best thing I have found is the rabbit processors with >the RabbitLink for remote debugging and programming. There seem to be >various libraries for downloading images from cameras, etc. Down side >is it is not ANSI C so I can not port code easily, and I hear it is a >little annoying.
There is an ANSI C compiler for the Rabbit, although I do not know if existing Dynamic C libraries can be used/easily adapted or whether they provide there own libraries. See http://www.rabbitconsulting.com/partners/prod.cfm?id=1 that is WinIDE from Softools Inc. http://www.softools.com/ -Aubrey
On Jul 9, 12:29=A0am, lucasvick...@gmail.com wrote:
> Hello, > I am looking into potential embedded microprocessors to use for a one > time project. =A0About 2-3 units will be produced. =A0A good software > library and a solid product are more important than volume pricing. > > - Remote programming and debugging is necessary. =A0This is a one time > project that will be installed in New Mexico (I am in NY), and I need > to be able to fix small glitches from home. =A0This should happen over > basic TCP/IP (not some crazy serial emulator I need to install > everywhere). =A0It is not practical to dedicate an entire computer > towards acting as the host for this. > - I am looking for a microcontroller that does not emit much heat. =A0It > will be enclosed in a unit that will be in surrounding temperatures of > 100+ (New Mexico). > - I plan on analyzing the input from 2 cameras at a rate of 2 frames > per second. =A0So 2x2 =3D 4 frames per second. =A0A shadow tracking > algorithm will be applied to one of the images. =A0I am not sure how > computationally expensive this will be but I don=92t expect it to be > huge. > - Ethernet connection is necessary to upload images to a specified > location (TCP/IP and FTP protocol support would be great). > - Thread support (or the likes). =A0I don=92t want any network delays to > interrupt the image analysis. > - File storage is not a huge deal but the easier the better. =A0Any kind > of file system support would be great, as I will most likely dump > debugging information from time to time on the image algorithm. > > Again this is low volume and time constrained, I=92d rather buy a lot of > pre-working parts. > > Currently the best thing I have found is the rabbit processors with > the RabbitLink for remote debugging and programming. =A0There seem to be > various libraries for downloading images from cameras, etc. =A0Down side > is it is not ANSI C so I can not port code easily, and I hear it is a > little annoying. > > Can anyone offer any alternatives? =A0I have seen quite a few options > but it seems like no one else offers TCP/IP based remote programming/ > debugging. > > Thank you kindly! > Lucas
Lucas: I am not seeing here what will disqualify Netburner. Any and all remote debugging will require you to open certain ports in the router at your NM site. the Netburner MOD5270 is a fine product for your application Chris
antedeluvian51 wrote:
> >> Currently the best thing I have found is the rabbit processors >> with the RabbitLink for remote debugging and programming. There >> seem to be various libraries for downloading images from cameras, >> etc. Down side is it is not ANSI C so I can not port code >> easily, and I hear it is a little annoying. > > There is an ANSI C compiler for the Rabbit, although I do not know > if existing Dynamic C libraries can be used/easily adapted or > whether they provide there own libraries. > > See http://www.rabbitconsulting.com/partners/prod.cfm?id=1 > > that is WinIDE from Softools Inc. http://www.softools.com/
That is interesting, and removes a major block to using the Rabbit. The other block (lack of full Z80 compatibility) is not removable. However the hardware should be able to implement full standard C. Does it comply with C99, or C90? Please do not remove attribution lines for any material you quote. Those are the initial "joe wrote" lines. -- [mail]: Chuck F (cbfalconer at maineline dot net) [page]: <http://cbfalconer.home.att.net> Try the download section.