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Motorola naming conventions

Started by Daniel L Newhouse September 12, 2004
Does anyone know a resource for the naming conventions Motorla uses
for its microprocessors, or even better yet, all of its ICs?



--- In , "Daniel L Newhouse"
<misterscary2001@y...> wrote:
> Does anyone know a resource for the naming conventions Motorla uses
> for its microprocessors, or even better yet, all of its ICs?

I want to add a real specific question, what does the 'HC' in m68HC11
mean?

I'd still like to know about the general naming conventions.



At 12:31 AM 9/13/2004 +0000, you wrote:
>--- In , "Daniel L Newhouse"
><misterscary2001@y...> wrote:
> > Does anyone know a resource for the naming conventions Motorla uses
> > for its microprocessors, or even better yet, all of its ICs?
>
>I want to add a real specific question, what does the 'HC' in m68HC11
>mean?
>
>I'd still like to know about the general naming conventions.


The 'HC" stands for Highspeed Cmos.

Motorola's older cpus i.e. 6800, 6801, 6802, 6803, and 6809 were all made
using Nmos,
and so they didn't have an 'HC' in the name. Also, HC technology didn't
come out until much
later then these older cpu's. The HC stuff was first out as 74HCxx stuff,
as one of many alternatives to
the original 7400 stuff, although not quite as fast as the 7400 stuff,
still faster than the 74Cxx stuff, which is
the old-technology Cmos.

Steve



If you take a look at the Reference Manual for the 68HC11, it shows the different meanings for the different part numbers. When I say reference manual, I mean the 620 page PDF file, and not the Reference Guide, which is considerably smaller.

LF

Steve Tabler <> wrote:
At 12:31 AM 9/13/2004 +0000, you wrote:
>--- In , "Daniel L Newhouse"
><misterscary2001@y...> wrote:
> > Does anyone know a resource for the naming conventions Motorla uses
> > for its microprocessors, or even better yet, all of its ICs?
>
>I want to add a real specific question, what does the 'HC' in m68HC11
>mean?
>
>I'd still like to know about the general naming conventions.


The 'HC" stands for Highspeed Cmos.

Motorola's older cpus i.e. 6800, 6801, 6802, 6803, and 6809 were all made
using Nmos,
and so they didn't have an 'HC' in the name. Also, HC technology didn't
come out until much
later then these older cpu's. The HC stuff was first out as 74HCxx stuff,
as one of many alternatives to
the original 7400 stuff, although not quite as fast as the 7400 stuff,
still faster than the 74Cxx stuff, which is
the old-technology Cmos.

Steve
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