Forums

68HC11 E2

Started by pike_mat August 26, 2005
I am looking for a 68HC11 E2 chip for my TAFE major project, we have
been told that we need this specific chip as the E9 does not have
enough memory and if we choose another chip with higher memory we will
be given a harder project and wont be able to work with our classmates
because they will have a completely different project and probably
couldn't help.

Does anyone know where i can buy one of these chips from? It would be
great if there was a reasonable supply as at least 15 people will be
needing this chip.

Thansk for any help you guys can provide.


I'm confused by your question, don't understand.

Do you mean the 68HC811E2? That has 2K of EEPROM, less memory than the E9,
so I don't understand your comparison. This 811E2 has been discontinued by
Freescale and may be hard to find, and expensive. You could try Rochester
Electronics under KMC811E2CP2. Or maybe someone on this list knows a
better source.

Or do you mean the 68HC711E20? That has 20K of one time programmable
memory, more than the E9. It's available from DigiKey but costs over $20
each.

Are you sure you can't use an 08 or 12 series processor from Freescale?
They have flash memory so you can reprogram many times, typically are less
expensive (for similar featurs) than the 68HC11. The problem with the
68HC11 family is that it's not recommended for new designs and will
probably be phased out of production in about a year or so.

Kerry Berland > I am looking for a 68HC11 E2 chip for my TAFE major project, we have
> been told that we need this specific chip as the E9 does not have
> enough memory and if we choose another chip with higher memory we will
> be given a harder project and wont be able to work with our classmates
> because they will have a completely different project and probably
> couldn't help.
>
> Does anyone know where i can buy one of these chips from? It would be
> great if there was a reasonable supply as at least 15 people will be
> needing this chip.
>
> Thansk for any help you guys can provide. >
> YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS




pike_mat wrote:
> I am looking for a 68HC11 E2 chip for my TAFE major project, we have
> been told that we need this specific chip as the E9 does not have

This is not a reasonable assignment. The E2 is a discontinued
chip, and is difficult to find.

> enough memory and if we choose another chip with higher memory we will
> be given a harder project and wont be able to work with our classmates
> because they will have a completely different project and probably
> couldn't help.
>
> Does anyone know where i can buy one of these chips from? It would be
> great if there was a reasonable supply as at least 15 people will be
> needing this chip.

I suggest you contact P.A.R.T.S. (the Portland area robotics
society). Some people over there may be able to help you.

http://www.portlandrobotics.org/

> Thansk for any help you guys can provide.

HTH

Mike
--
p="p=%c%s%c;main(){printf(p,34,p,34);}";main(){printf(p,34,p,34);}
This message made from 100% recycled bits.
You have found the bank of Larn.
I can explain it for you, but I can't understand it for you.
I speak only for myself, and I am unanimous in that!



pike_mat wrote:
> I am looking for a 68HC11 E2 chip for my TAFE major project, we have

Oh, also try SRS. I mentioned that first before PARTS, but editing
caused it to go away, somehow.

http://www.seattlerobotics.org/

Marvin Green over there has BotBoard and BotBoard Plus stuff,
and they may be able to steer you to sources.

Mike
--
p="p=%c%s%c;main(){printf(p,34,p,34);}";main(){printf(p,34,p,34);}
This message made from 100% recycled bits.
You have found the bank of Larn.
I can explain it for you, but I can't understand it for you.
I speak only for myself, and I am unanimous in that!



Hi Kerry,

I don't think the 68HC11 will be red for some time. There are
too many thing made that use them still in production.

I agree that using them for new design is not good practice. But
a tool for teaching they are still an excellent chip. Being slow
and memory limited they encourage good programming methods. In
today's world 2K of rom and 2K of OTP ROM, EEPROM or ROM and 512
bytes of EEPROM chugging along at 2 MHz may not seem like much.
But using that configuration you learn the cost of complex
functions such a printf() and the penalty of floating point and
divide instructions. It encourages the use of fixed point math,
managing you math in a base you can shift instead of divide and
find and use integer square root and trig functions.

There is also a very great deal of source code and experience
avilible for it free for the asking.

A 68HC12 with flash seems like a good up grade but I am told the
flash has a pretty short life of about 100 reporgraming cycles.
Fine for product but not for development. If the MC9S12DP256 has
a longer lived flash it might be a better place to go for
teaching as it should have a long life.
http://www.freescale.com/webapp/sps/site/prod_summary.jsp?code=MC9S12DP256&nodeId4359rKdhZQT4KVxh

While it is not what is need for this problem New Micros 68HC11
broad NMIX-0022-OEM will emulate almost any 68HC11 configuration
but it is bit expensive as it uses the long obsolete 68HC24 port
expander chip. It makes a great development tool for 68HC11's.
All you have to do in the final code in some cases is move the
memory location form what you have on the development board to
agree with the chip you are using.

Gordon

Gordon Couger
Biosystems& Ag Engineering (retired)
Oklahoma State University
www.couger.com/gcouger

kerry@kerr... wrote:
> I'm confused by your question, don't understand.
>
> Do you mean the 68HC811E2? That has 2K of EEPROM, less memory than the E9,
> so I don't understand your comparison. This 811E2 has been discontinued by
> Freescale and may be hard to find, and expensive. You could try Rochester
> Electronics under KMC811E2CP2. Or maybe someone on this list knows a
> better source.
>
> Or do you mean the 68HC711E20? That has 20K of one time programmable
> memory, more than the E9. It's available from DigiKey but costs over $20
> each.
>
> Are you sure you can't use an 08 or 12 series processor from Freescale?
> They have flash memory so you can reprogram many times, typically are less
> expensive (for similar featurs) than the 68HC11. The problem with the
> 68HC11 family is that it's not recommended for new designs and will
> probably be phased out of production in about a year or so.
>
> Kerry Berland >
>> I am looking for a 68HC11 E2 chip for my TAFE major project, we have
>> been told that we need this specific chip as the E9 does not have
>> enough memory and if we choose another chip with higher memory we will
>> be given a harder project and wont be able to work with our classmates
>> because they will have a completely different project and probably
>> couldn't help.
>>
>> Does anyone know where i can buy one of these chips from? It would be
>> great if there was a reasonable supply as at least 15 people will be
>> needing this chip.
>>
>> Thansk for any help you guys can provide.
>>
>>
>>
>> YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS
>>
> >
> Yahoo! Groups Links




Gordon-
Quick question first-can you clarify which "E2" part the student is talking
about? If it's the 68HC811E2, that's already been discontinued, is quite
hard to get hold of, and is very expensive.
More generally--I love the 68HC11 too. We have done lots of 68HC11 designs.
We still make industrial controllers which use the 68HC11 for a very good
customer. The clock speed is perfectly adequate for many applications.
Agree also that that the 68HC11 has been a good tool for teaching.
But, I have to disagree that the 68HC11 will continue to live on for an
indefinite period. Freescale has notified its registered design consultants
(Design Alliance) that it intends to phase out the 68HC05 and 68HC11, albeit
with plenty of notice. They are encouraging Design Alliance members to tell
their clients that the time for redesign has arrived. They have told us that
their volumes on the 68HC11 have fallen significantly from their peak years
ago. It's my understanding that the 68HC11 has not been designed into a new
automotive module or cell phone for a number of years, and these were two of
the high-volume markets that this microcontroller once served. They have
reduced the number of chip foundries making these chips to just a couple.
The costs on the 68HC11 have already gone up, and will go up further.
My guess is that the formal discontinuance of manufacture for the 68HC11
will come in late 2006 or in 2007. Freescale will give sufficient notice for
purchasing agents to make last-time buys, so there should be time for
product manufacturers to make a reasonable transition.
For professors-developing a course curriculum isn't a trivial task. So in
the coming months I really think that the educational community should be
taking a look at future roadmaps.
Here's another factor. Speaking as someone who has hired engineers fresh out
of college, the time is coming fast where experience with a newer processor
than the 68HC11 will be viewed more positively.
For general purpose use, I would take a look at the 9S12E64. Flash
programming/erase cycles are rated at 10,000, should be enough. (Table B-6,
page 131 on the data sheet V01.04.) The 80-pin package has more port pins
than a 68HC11 with a PRU (if you can still get one), and costs a lot less
than a 68HC11 plus a PRU. The 9S12E64 also costs about the same as a
68HC11E1 with a 74HC373 address latch, a 74HC00 gate, and an external
byte-wide memory.
Another factor, I think students probably should get experience using the
debugging tools now available through the 9S12 BDM interface.
Best regards,

Kerry Berland
kerry@kerr...
Silicon Engines
2101 Oxford Road
847-803-6860
Fax 847-803-6870
Des Plaines, IL 60018 USA

-----Original Message-----
From: m68HC11@m68H... [mailto:m68HC11@m68H...] On Behalf Of
Gordon Couger
Sent: Friday, August 26, 2005 11:27 AM
To: m68HC11@m68H...
Subject: Re: [m68HC11] 68HC11 E2
Hi Kerry,

I don't think the 68HC11 will be red for some time. There are
too many thing made that use them still in production.

I agree that using them for new design is not good practice. But
a tool for teaching they are still an excellent chip. Being slow
and memory limited they encourage good programming methods. In
today's world 2K of rom and 2K of OTP ROM, EEPROM or ROM and 512
bytes of EEPROM chugging along at 2 MHz may not seem like much.
But using that configuration you learn the cost of complex
functions such a printf() and the penalty of floating point and
divide instructions. It encourages the use of fixed point math,
managing you math in a base you can shift instead of divide and
find and use integer square root and trig functions.

There is also a very great deal of source code and experience
avilible for it free for the asking.

A 68HC12 with flash seems like a good up grade but I am told the
flash has a pretty short life of about 100 reporgraming cycles.
Fine for product but not for development. If the MC9S12DP256 has
a longer lived flash it might be a better place to go for
teaching as it should have a long life.
http://www.freescale.com/webapp/sps/site/prod_summary.jsp?code=MC9S12DP256
<http://www.freescale.com/webapp/sps/site/prod_summary.jsp?code=MC9S12DP256&
nodeId4359rKdhZQT4KVxh> &nodeId4359rKdhZQT4KVxh

While it is not what is need for this problem New Micros 68HC11
broad NMIX-0022-OEM will emulate almost any 68HC11 configuration
but it is bit expensive as it uses the long obsolete 68HC24 port
expander chip. It makes a great development tool for 68HC11's.
All you have to do in the final code in some cases is move the
memory location form what you have on the development board to
agree with the chip you are using.

Gordon

Gordon Couger
Biosystems& Ag Engineering (retired)
Oklahoma State University
www.couger.com/gcouger

kerry@kerr... wrote:
> I'm confused by your question, don't understand.
>
> Do you mean the 68HC811E2? That has 2K of EEPROM, less memory than the E9,
> so I don't understand your comparison. This 811E2 has been discontinued by
> Freescale and may be hard to find, and expensive. You could try Rochester
> Electronics under KMC811E2CP2. Or maybe someone on this list knows a
> better source.
>
> Or do you mean the 68HC711E20? That has 20K of one time programmable
> memory, more than the E9. It's available from DigiKey but costs over $20
> each.
>
> Are you sure you can't use an 08 or 12 series processor from Freescale?
> They have flash memory so you can reprogram many times, typically are less
> expensive (for similar featurs) than the 68HC11. The problem with the
> 68HC11 family is that it's not recommended for new designs and will
> probably be phased out of production in about a year or so.
>
> Kerry Berland >
>> I am looking for a 68HC11 E2 chip for my TAFE major project, we have
>> been told that we need this specific chip as the E9 does not have
>> enough memory and if we choose another chip with higher memory we will
>> be given a harder project and wont be able to work with our classmates
>> because they will have a completely different project and probably
>> couldn't help.
>>
>> Does anyone know where i can buy one of these chips from? It would be
>> great if there was a reasonable supply as at least 15 people will be
>> needing this chip.
>>
>> Thansk for any help you guys can provide.
>>
>>
>>
>> > Service.
_____


Nice, well-considered post.

Thank you!

Bill --- Kerry Berland <kerry@kerr...> wrote:

> Gordon- >
> Quick question first-can you clarify which "E2" part the student is talking
> about? If it's the 68HC811E2, that's already been discontinued, is quite
> hard to get hold of, and is very expensive. >
> More generally--I love the 68HC11 too. We have done lots of 68HC11 designs.
> We still make industrial controllers which use the 68HC11 for a very good
> customer. The clock speed is perfectly adequate for many applications. >
> Agree also that that the 68HC11 has been a good tool for teaching. >
> But, I have to disagree that the 68HC11 will continue to live on for an
> indefinite period. Freescale has notified its registered design consultants
> (Design Alliance) that it intends to phase out the 68HC05 and 68HC11, albeit
> with plenty of notice. They are encouraging Design Alliance members to tell
> their clients that the time for redesign has arrived. They have told us that
> their volumes on the 68HC11 have fallen significantly from their peak years
> ago. It's my understanding that the 68HC11 has not been designed into a new
> automotive module or cell phone for a number of years, and these were two of
> the high-volume markets that this microcontroller once served. They have
> reduced the number of chip foundries making these chips to just a couple.
> The costs on the 68HC11 have already gone up, and will go up further. >
> My guess is that the formal discontinuance of manufacture for the 68HC11
> will come in late 2006 or in 2007. Freescale will give sufficient notice for
> purchasing agents to make last-time buys, so there should be time for
> product manufacturers to make a reasonable transition. >
> For professors-developing a course curriculum isn't a trivial task. So in
> the coming months I really think that the educational community should be
> taking a look at future roadmaps. >
> Here's another factor. Speaking as someone who has hired engineers fresh out
> of college, the time is coming fast where experience with a newer processor
> than the 68HC11 will be viewed more positively. >
> For general purpose use, I would take a look at the 9S12E64. Flash
> programming/erase cycles are rated at 10,000, should be enough. (Table B-6,
> page 131 on the data sheet V01.04.) The 80-pin package has more port pins
> than a 68HC11 with a PRU (if you can still get one), and costs a lot less
> than a 68HC11 plus a PRU. The 9S12E64 also costs about the same as a
> 68HC11E1 with a 74HC373 address latch, a 74HC00 gate, and an external
> byte-wide memory. >
> Another factor, I think students probably should get experience using the
> debugging tools now available through the 9S12 BDM interface. >
> Best regards,
>
> Kerry Berland
> kerry@kerr...
> Silicon Engines
> 2101 Oxford Road
> 847-803-6860
> Fax 847-803-6870
> Des Plaines, IL 60018 USA
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: m68HC11@m68H... [mailto:m68HC11@m68H...] On Behalf Of
> Gordon Couger
> Sent: Friday, August 26, 2005 11:27 AM
> To: m68HC11@m68H...
> Subject: Re: [m68HC11] 68HC11 E2 >
> Hi Kerry,
>
> I don't think the 68HC11 will be red for some time. There are
> too many thing made that use them still in production.
>
> I agree that using them for new design is not good practice. But
> a tool for teaching they are still an excellent chip. Being slow
> and memory limited they encourage good programming methods. In
> today's world 2K of rom and 2K of OTP ROM, EEPROM or ROM and 512
> bytes of EEPROM chugging along at 2 MHz may not seem like much.
> But using that configuration you learn the cost of complex
> functions such a printf() and the penalty of floating point and
> divide instructions. It encourages the use of fixed point math,
> managing you math in a base you can shift instead of divide and
> find and use integer square root and trig functions.
>
> There is also a very great deal of source code and experience
> avilible for it free for the asking.
>
> A 68HC12 with flash seems like a good up grade but I am told the
> flash has a pretty short life of about 100 reporgraming cycles.
> Fine for product but not for development. If the MC9S12DP256 has
> a longer lived flash it might be a better place to go for
> teaching as it should have a long life.
> http://www.freescale.com/webapp/sps/site/prod_summary.jsp?code=MC9S12DP256
> <http://www.freescale.com/webapp/sps/site/prod_summary.jsp?code=MC9S12DP256&
> nodeId4359rKdhZQT4KVxh> &nodeId4359rKdhZQT4KVxh
>
> While it is not what is need for this problem New Micros 68HC11
> broad NMIX-0022-OEM will emulate almost any 68HC11 configuration
> but it is bit expensive as it uses the long obsolete 68HC24 port
> expander chip. It makes a great development tool for 68HC11's.
> All you have to do in the final code in some cases is move the
> memory location form what you have on the development board to
> agree with the chip you are using.
>
> Gordon
>
> Gordon Couger
> Biosystems& Ag Engineering (retired)
> Oklahoma State University
> www.couger.com/gcouger
>
> kerry@kerr... wrote:
> > I'm confused by your question, don't understand.
> >
> > Do you mean the 68HC811E2? That has 2K of EEPROM, less memory than the E9,
> > so I don't understand your comparison. This 811E2 has been discontinued by
> > Freescale and may be hard to find, and expensive. You could try Rochester
> > Electronics under KMC811E2CP2. Or maybe someone on this list knows a
> > better source.
> >
> > Or do you mean the 68HC711E20? That has 20K of one time programmable
> > memory, more than the E9. It's available from DigiKey but costs over $20
> > each.
> >
> > Are you sure you can't use an 08 or 12 series processor from Freescale?
> > They have flash memory so you can reprogram many times, typically are less
> > expensive (for similar featurs) than the 68HC11. The problem with the
> > 68HC11 family is that it's not recommended for new designs and will
> > probably be phased out of production in about a year or so.
> >
> > Kerry Berland
> >
> >
> >
> >> I am looking for a 68HC11 E2 chip for my TAFE major project, we have
> >> been told that we need this specific chip as the E9 does not have
> >> enough memory and if we choose another chip with higher memory we will
> >> be given a harder project and wont be able to work with our classmates
> >> because they will have a completely different project and probably
> >> couldn't help.
> >>
> >> Does anyone know where i can buy one of these chips from? It would be
> >> great if there was a reasonable supply as at least 15 people will be
> >> needing this chip.
> >>
> >> Thansk for any help you guys can provide.
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >> > Service. >
> _____ >
> Yahoo! Groups Links >
>




Kerry,

Changing from a 68HC11 to 68HC12 does to have to be a real
change. With long lived flash it does make the costs of tools
less and makes having the students buy boards for future use a
more realistic option. Letting you be more flexible class size.
With more perennials it can be a lot better teaching tool. The
CAN network in particular.

I have a hoard of 2 X68HC1E2s that I got off a Motorola's
engineers desk as free as samples back at the dawn of time in
the days when Motorola cared about developers and 2 MC68HCH11E2
chips I bough from a guy in Poland for $20 each a long time ago.

If I was hiring a programmer I wouldn't make any distinction
between work done on a 68HC11 or 68HC12. In fact the same
project on a 68HC11E2 would impress me more than on a faster
chip with more resources. I an applicant I would like to see
more net working experience with a standard protocol more
complex than NMEA 0183. But even using SLIP and something like
NEMA 0183 would be nice to see. Added points for assembly
emended in C code, disturbed processing and the less lines of
code the more I am impressed. What I don't like to see is a
bunch of simple projects each on a different family of
processors or everything done on PICs. One reasonably complex
project that involves communication and programming on two or
more computers is a lot more impressive than 10 stand alone
projects with PICs. A project that takes planing and longer term
commitment than one semester is a lot more impressive. A
substantial contribution to an on going project that takes
coordination with others and woking with an exisitng code base
is really good. Race cars, robots such are good for that.

Gordon
Gordon Couger
DataLink Systems
www.rfdata.net
Kerry Berland wrote:
> Gordon- >
> Quick question first-can you clarify which "E2" part the
student is talking
> about? If it's the 68HC811E2, that's already been
discontinued, is quite
> hard to get hold of, and is very expensive. >
> More generally--I love the 68HC11 too. We have done lots of
68HC11 designs.
> We still make industrial controllers which use the 68HC11 for
a very good
> customer. The clock speed is perfectly adequate for many
applications.
> Agree also that that the 68HC11 has been a good tool for
teaching.
> But, I have to disagree that the 68HC11 will continue to live
on for an
> indefinite period. Freescale has notified its registered
design consultants
> (Design Alliance) that it intends to phase out the 68HC05 and
68HC11, albeit
> with plenty of notice. They are encouraging Design Alliance
members to tell
> their clients that the time for redesign has arrived. They
have told us that
> their volumes on the 68HC11 have fallen significantly from
their peak years
> ago. It's my understanding that the 68HC11 has not been
designed into a new
> automotive module or cell phone for a number of years, and
these were two of
> the high-volume markets that this microcontroller once
served. They have
> reduced the number of chip foundries making these chips to
just a couple.
> The costs on the 68HC11 have already gone up, and will go up
further.
> My guess is that the formal discontinuance of manufacture for
the 68HC11
> will come in late 2006 or in 2007. Freescale will give
sufficient notice for
> purchasing agents to make last-time buys, so there should be
time for
> product manufacturers to make a reasonable transition. >
> For professors-developing a course curriculum isn't a trivial
task. So in
> the coming months I really think that the educational
community should be
> taking a look at future roadmaps. >
> Here's another factor. Speaking as someone who has hired
engineers fresh out
> of college, the time is coming fast where experience with a
newer processor
> than the 68HC11 will be viewed more positively. >
> For general purpose use, I would take a look at the 9S12E64.
Flash
> programming/erase cycles are rated at 10,000, should be
enough. (Table B-6,
> page 131 on the data sheet V01.04.) The 80-pin package has
more port pins
> than a 68HC11 with a PRU (if you can still get one), and
costs a lot less
> than a 68HC11 plus a PRU. The 9S12E64 also costs about the
same as a
> 68HC11E1 with a 74HC373 address latch, a 74HC00 gate, and an
external
> byte-wide memory. >
> Another factor, I think students probably should get
experience using the
> debugging tools now available through the 9S12 BDM interface. >
> Best regards,
>
> Kerry Berland
> kerry@kerr...
> Silicon Engines
> 2101 Oxford Road
> 847-803-6860
> Fax 847-803-6870
> Des Plaines, IL 60018 USA
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: m68HC11@m68H...
[mailto:m68HC11@m68H...] On Behalf Of
> Gordon Couger
> Sent: Friday, August 26, 2005 11:27 AM
> To: m68HC11@m68H...
> Subject: Re: [m68HC11] 68HC11 E2 >
> Hi Kerry,
>
> I don't think the 68HC11 will be red for some time. There are
> too many thing made that use them still in production.
>
> I agree that using them for new design is not good practice. But
> a tool for teaching they are still an excellent chip. Being slow
> and memory limited they encourage good programming methods. In
> today's world 2K of rom and 2K of OTP ROM, EEPROM or ROM and 512
> bytes of EEPROM chugging along at 2 MHz may not seem like much.
> But using that configuration you learn the cost of complex
> functions such a printf() and the penalty of floating point and
> divide instructions. It encourages the use of fixed point math,
> managing you math in a base you can shift instead of divide and
> find and use integer square root and trig functions.
>
> There is also a very great deal of source code and experience
> avilible for it free for the asking.
>
> A 68HC12 with flash seems like a good up grade but I am told the
> flash has a pretty short life of about 100 reporgraming cycles.
> Fine for product but not for development. If the MC9S12DP256 has
> a longer lived flash it might be a better place to go for
> teaching as it should have a long life.
>
http://www.freescale.com/webapp/sps/site/prod_summary.jsp?code=MC9S12DP256
>
<http://www.freescale.com/webapp/sps/site/prod_summary.jsp?code=MC9S12DP256&
> nodeId4359rKdhZQT4KVxh> &nodeId4359rKdhZQT4KVxh
>
> While it is not what is need for this problem New Micros 68HC11
> broad NMIX-0022-OEM will emulate almost any 68HC11 configuration
> but it is bit expensive as it uses the long obsolete 68HC24 port
> expander chip. It makes a great development tool for 68HC11's.
> All you have to do in the final code in some cases is move the
> memory location form what you have on the development board to
> agree with the chip you are using.
>
> Gordon
>
> Gordon Couger
> Biosystems& Ag Engineering (retired)
> Oklahoma State University
> www.couger.com/gcouger
>
> kerry@kerr... wrote:
>
>>I'm confused by your question, don't understand.
>>
>>Do you mean the 68HC811E2? That has 2K of EEPROM, less memory
than the E9,
>>so I don't understand your comparison. This 811E2 has been
discontinued by
>>Freescale and may be hard to find, and expensive. You could
try Rochester
>>Electronics under KMC811E2CP2. Or maybe someone on this list
knows a
>>better source.
>>
>>Or do you mean the 68HC711E20? That has 20K of one time
programmable
>>memory, more than the E9. It's available from DigiKey but
costs over $20
>>each.
>>
>>Are you sure you can't use an 08 or 12 series processor from
Freescale?
>>They have flash memory so you can reprogram many times,
typically are less
>>expensive (for similar featurs) than the 68HC11. The problem
with the
>>68HC11 family is that it's not recommended for new designs
and will
>>probably be phased out of production in about a year or so.
>>
>>Kerry Berland
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>> I am looking for a 68HC11 E2 chip for my TAFE major
project, we have
>>>been told that we need this specific chip as the E9 does not
have
>>>enough memory and if we choose another chip with higher
memory we will
>>>be given a harder project and wont be able to work with our
classmates
>>>because they will have a completely different project and
probably
>>>couldn't help.
>>>
>>>Does anyone know where i can buy one of these chips from? It
would be
>>>great if there was a reasonable supply as at least 15 people
will be
>>>needing this chip.
>>>
>>>Thansk for any help you guys can provide.
>>>
>>>
>>>