Forums

Thinking of using LPC2294

Started by dibosco April 13, 2004
Hi folks,

I have a project coming up for which I need some CAN ports and a
reasonable amount of power (in MIPS, not in mA!). The LPC2294 looks
perfect from what I can see, but I've never used ARM devices before
and would very much appreciate a little input.

It looks to me like the Ashling LPC2000 dev board would be good for
getting me familiar with ARM, and the Crossworks compiler runs under
Linux which is what I want. Does anyone have any experience with
Ashling in general? Are they good products? Would Crosswork's kit work
with it?

My experince includes 68k, Infineon (X)C166, Fujitsu 16 bit devices
and lots of eight bit stuff, so I have a good amount of experice
including a large amout of 16 and some 32 bit micros. A few of the
micros I've worked with have JTAG interfaces and I like the fact that
these Phillips devices have them too. Are the ARM devices reasonably
easy to get to grips with for someone with the above experience?

Finally, I would need to hang a couple of mega bytes of RAM on the
external address and data bus, how do ARM devices with internal RAM
cope with that? It might seem like a daft question, but, for example,
the Infineon XC16x devcies with internal flash aren't so great for
hanging stuff off the external bus because of memory segmentation.

Many thanks,

Rob



An Engineer's Guide to the LPC2100 Series

Message
Hi Rob,
 
Our LPC2000 dev board includes an on-board USB based emulator that will only work with our PathFinder debugger. In addition, we supply an IDE/GNU compiler, Flash programming and a range of JTAG and trace tools all hosted under Windows. See www.ashling.com/support/LPC2000 for more info (check out the faq as well).
 
Our LPC2000 dev board can also work with external JTAG tools (e.g. our Opella or third party tools like ARM's MultiICE, Wiggler etc.).
 
Contact me directly if you need further assistance.
 
-----Original Message-----
From: dibosco [mailto:r...@apostrophe.co.uk]
Sent: 13 April 2004 14:42
To: l...@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [lpc2000] Thinking of using LPC2294

Hi folks,

I have a project coming up for which I need some CAN ports and a
reasonable amount of power (in MIPS, not in mA!). The LPC2294 looks
perfect from what I can see, but I've never used ARM devices before
and would very much appreciate a little input.

It looks to me like the Ashling LPC2000 dev board would  be good for
getting me familiar with ARM, and the Crossworks compiler runs under
Linux which is what I want. Does anyone have any experience with
Ashling in general? Are they good products? Would Crosswork's kit work
with it?

My experince includes 68k, Infineon (X)C166, Fujitsu 16 bit devices
and lots of eight bit stuff, so I have a good amount of experice
including a large amout of 16 and some 32 bit micros. A few of the
micros I've worked with have JTAG interfaces and I like the fact that
these Phillips devices have them too.  Are the ARM devices reasonably
easy to get to grips with for someone with the above experience?

Finally, I would need to hang a couple of mega bytes of RAM on the
external address and data bus, how do ARM devices with internal RAM
cope with that? It might seem like a daft question, but, for example,
the Infineon XC16x devcies with internal flash aren't so great for
hanging stuff off the external bus because of memory segmentation.

Many thanks,

Rob



Rob,

I've about five months experience with the Ashling EVBA7 LPC2106 board.
It is part of a complete development system including gcc compiler,
source-level debugger, etc. Full license, including board, is about
1500USD. It's has its many quirks, but its big advantage is that it
does work right out of the box. However, it is windows-centric. Also,
I seem to recall that for the non-210x LPC chips, you need to buy a bare
board and solder the LPC chip on yourself.

Others on this list are developing on Linux, they might be able to point
you to other tools that might better fit your needs in that environment.

Curt

-----Original Message-----
From: dibosco [mailto:]
Sent: Tuesday, April 13, 2004 6:42 AM
To:
Subject: [lpc2000] Thinking of using LPC2294 Hi folks,

I have a project coming up for which I need some CAN ports and a
reasonable amount of power (in MIPS, not in mA!). The LPC2294 looks
perfect from what I can see, but I've never used ARM devices before and
would very much appreciate a little input.

It looks to me like the Ashling LPC2000 dev board would be good for
getting me familiar with ARM, and the Crossworks compiler runs under
Linux which is what I want. Does anyone have any experience with Ashling
in general? Are they good products? Would Crosswork's kit work with it?

My experince includes 68k, Infineon (X)C166, Fujitsu 16 bit devices and
lots of eight bit stuff, so I have a good amount of experice including a
large amout of 16 and some 32 bit micros. A few of the micros I've
worked with have JTAG interfaces and I like the fact that these Phillips
devices have them too. Are the ARM devices reasonably easy to get to
grips with for someone with the above experience?

Finally, I would need to hang a couple of mega bytes of RAM on the
external address and data bus, how do ARM devices with internal RAM cope
with that? It might seem like a daft question, but, for example, the
Infineon XC16x devcies with internal flash aren't so great for hanging
stuff off the external bus because of memory segmentation.

Many thanks,

Rob Yahoo! Groups Links




Message
Hi Curt,
Thanks for your feedback. FYI, we now offer a range of adapters with the devices all ready soldered/tested. Details on our page at www.ashling.com/support/LPC2000.
 
I'd appreciate if you send me some details (directly) on the "quirks" you mention below. We're working on our next release and will incorporate good suggestions time/schedules permitting.
 
-----Original Message-----
From: Curt Powell [mailto:c...@sierraridge.com]
Sent: 13 April 2004 15:29
To: l...@yahoogroups.com
Subject: RE: [lpc2000] Thinking of using LPC2294

Rob,

I've about five months experience with the Ashling EVBA7 LPC2106 board.
It is part of a complete development system including gcc compiler,
source-level debugger, etc.  Full license, including board, is about
1500USD.  It's has its many quirks, but its big advantage is that it
does work right out of the box.  However, it is windows-centric.  Also,
I seem to recall that for the non-210x LPC chips, you need to buy a bare
board and solder the LPC chip on yourself.

Others on this list are developing on Linux, they might be able to point
you to other tools that might better fit your needs in that environment.

Curt

-----Original Message-----
From: dibosco [mailto:r...@apostrophe.co.uk]
Sent: Tuesday, April 13, 2004 6:42 AM
To: l...@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [lpc2000] Thinking of using LPC2294Hi folks,

I have a project coming up for which I need some CAN ports and a
reasonable amount of power (in MIPS, not in mA!). The LPC2294 looks
perfect from what I can see, but I've never used ARM devices before and
would very much appreciate a little input.

It looks to me like the Ashling LPC2000 dev board would  be good for
getting me familiar with ARM, and the Crossworks compiler runs under
Linux which is what I want. Does anyone have any experience with Ashling
in general? Are they good products? Would Crosswork's kit work with it?

My experince includes 68k, Infineon (X)C166, Fujitsu 16 bit devices and
lots of eight bit stuff, so I have a good amount of experice including a
large amout of 16 and some 32 bit micros. A few of the micros I've
worked with have JTAG interfaces and I like the fact that these Phillips
devices have them too.  Are the ARM devices reasonably easy to get to
grips with for someone with the above experience?

Finally, I would need to hang a couple of mega bytes of RAM on the
external address and data bus, how do ARM devices with internal RAM cope
with that? It might seem like a daft question, but, for example, the
Infineon XC16x devcies with internal flash aren't so great for hanging
stuff off the external bus because of memory segmentation.

Many thanks,

RobYahoo! Groups Links

Hi folks,

Thanks for the help. I assumed no-one had replied and this was a dead
list as I had no reply, then realised I'd joined the old shadow group,
not the proper one! Sheesh, if I can't get that right, what chance do
I stand programming ARMs?! ;-)

Cheers,

Rob

--- In , "Hugh O'Keeffe" <hugh.okeeffe@a...> wrote:
> Hi Curt,
> Thanks for your feedback. FYI, we now offer a range of adapters with the
> devices all ready soldered/tested. Details on our page at
> www.ashling.com/support/LPC2000.
>
> I'd appreciate if you send me some details (directly) on the
"quirks" you
> mention below. We're working on our next release and will
incorporate good
> suggestions time/schedules permitting. >
>
> Hugh @ http://www.ashling.com/support/lpc2100/
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Curt Powell [mailto:curt.powell@s...]
> Sent: 13 April 2004 15:29
> To:
> Subject: RE: [lpc2000] Thinking of using LPC2294 > Rob,
>
> I've about five months experience with the Ashling EVBA7 LPC2106 board.
> It is part of a complete development system including gcc compiler,
> source-level debugger, etc. Full license, including board, is about
> 1500USD. It's has its many quirks, but its big advantage is that it
> does work right out of the box. However, it is windows-centric. Also,
> I seem to recall that for the non-210x LPC chips, you need to buy a bare
> board and solder the LPC chip on yourself.
>
> Others on this list are developing on Linux, they might be able to point
> you to other tools that might better fit your needs in that environment.
>
> Curt
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: dibosco [mailto:robert.wood@a...]
> Sent: Tuesday, April 13, 2004 6:42 AM
> To:
> Subject: [lpc2000] Thinking of using LPC2294 > Hi folks,
>
> I have a project coming up for which I need some CAN ports and a
> reasonable amount of power (in MIPS, not in mA!). The LPC2294 looks
> perfect from what I can see, but I've never used ARM devices before and
> would very much appreciate a little input.
>
> It looks to me like the Ashling LPC2000 dev board would be good for
> getting me familiar with ARM, and the Crossworks compiler runs under
> Linux which is what I want. Does anyone have any experience with Ashling
> in general? Are they good products? Would Crosswork's kit work with it?
>
> My experince includes 68k, Infineon (X)C166, Fujitsu 16 bit devices and
> lots of eight bit stuff, so I have a good amount of experice including a
> large amout of 16 and some 32 bit micros. A few of the micros I've
> worked with have JTAG interfaces and I like the fact that these Phillips
> devices have them too. Are the ARM devices reasonably easy to get to
> grips with for someone with the above experience?
>
> Finally, I would need to hang a couple of mega bytes of RAM on the
> external address and data bus, how do ARM devices with internal RAM cope
> with that? It might seem like a daft question, but, for example, the
> Infineon XC16x devcies with internal flash aren't so great for hanging
> stuff off the external bus because of memory segmentation.
>
> Many thanks,
>
> Rob > > .