AVR vs PIC

Started by Vecheslav Silagadze March 31, 2004
I took a brief look at the Atmel AVR datasheets and it seems that
even the most lowly uC has vastly more memory and functionality than
a PIC with the same pin count. Is there something I'm missing here?
why is the AVR not more popular? Could it be the generosity of
Microchip with respect to giving out free samples....?

Vecheslav Silagadze



first mover advantage. rich development environment. thousands of
designs available. tons of code for the downloading. price.

--- In , "Vecheslav Silagadze"
<uwobjectivist@h...> wrote:
> I took a brief look at the Atmel AVR datasheets and it seems that
> even the most lowly uC has vastly more memory and functionality
than
> a PIC with the same pin count. Is there something I'm missing here?
> why is the AVR not more popular? Could it be the generosity of
> Microchip with respect to giving out free samples....?
>
> Vecheslav Silagadze






On Thu, 1 Apr 2004, Phil wrote:

> first mover advantage. rich development environment. thousands of
> designs available. tons of code for the downloading.


price.

Definitely this is just a regional point of view.

Vasile >
> --- In , "Vecheslav Silagadze"
> <uwobjectivist@h...> wrote:
> > I took a brief look at the Atmel AVR datasheets and it seems that
> > even the most lowly uC has vastly more memory and functionality
> than
> > a PIC with the same pin count. Is there something I'm missing here?
> > why is the AVR not more popular? Could it be the generosity of
> > Microchip with respect to giving out free samples....?
> >
> > Vecheslav Silagadze >
>
> to unsubscribe, go to http://www.yahoogroups.com and follow the instructions
> Yahoo! Groups Links




I guess you must check prices out. Microchip has a microcontrollers line so
cheap!! Obvisouly many of them have less features rather AVR, however its
all that you may need for a while!! Regards,
Wilson Antonieti Engenharia de Desenvolvimento Tel.: (11) 4223-5117 Fax.:
(11) 4223-5103 Visite nosso site:
www.contemp.com.br PRECIS AO SEU ALCANCE!!!
----- Original Message -----
From: "Vecheslav Silagadze" <>
To: <>
Sent: Wednesday, March 31, 2004 9:41 PM
Subject: [piclist] AVR vs PIC > I took a brief look at the Atmel AVR datasheets and it seems that
> even the most lowly uC has vastly more memory and functionality than
> a PIC with the same pin count. Is there something I'm missing here?
> why is the AVR not more popular? Could it be the generosity of
> Microchip with respect to giving out free samples....?
>
> Vecheslav Silagadze >
> to unsubscribe, go to http://www.yahoogroups.com and follow the
instructions
> Yahoo! Groups Links >
>




--- In , "Vecheslav Silagadze"
<uwobjectivist@h...> wrote:
> I took a brief look at the Atmel AVR datasheets and it seems that
> even the most lowly uC has vastly more memory and functionality
than
> a PIC with the same pin count. Is there something I'm missing here?
> why is the AVR not more popular? Could it be the generosity of
> Microchip with respect to giving out free samples....?
>
> Vecheslav Silagadze


Atmel has a lot of catching up to do.

They do offer a superior product in many areas, but when you can put
your whole project in the memory of a PIC why do you need more, or
more accuratly, why do you want to pay more for the chip ? I think Atmel and Microchip both suffer from the high end blues. It
seems to me that by offering free samples, people use your product,
learn it and use it as a tool.

That would also work out for applications. Neither company has far
reaching projects, but both offer some code for projects.

If Atmel wanted to take a huge share of the market, they could offer
a sub $1.00 chip in 8, 14 or 18 pin, even with limited memory or
features as a price point. That would get the attention of many
people.

Second, following Parallax, have well documented papers on how to do
something. Heck, internally, they could have their engineers do that
and get great respoinse, or externally, offer $100.00 in programmers
or chips on a contest, all projects entered would have to meet some
level of simplicity.

Personally, I find the AVR-freaks list extreemly hard to follow. The
Yahoo style list exposes everyone to everything. on the Crownhill
type list for Proton+ and AVRfreaks, you have to know what you want
and then it has to be where is supposed to be. Kinda like a library.
it may have tons of data, but more of us find the web easier to use. Also, outside of some few areas, the Atmel line does not offer
something that cannot be done on a PIC, so they are banking on new
users, not converts tha means they are fighting for users, not
sucking them in the door.

Dave


Phil says:
>first mover advantage. rich development environment. thousands of
>designs available. tons of code for the downloading. price.

Also the most important: Availability.  We use slightly over 14K
Microchip parts per month and have never had an availability problem.
The one product we have that uses and AVR has been on production
hold due to part shortage several times.

Jim