ICSP thing

Started by ydexter April 6, 2004
Hello,

I saw people are talking about ICSP for PICs. Yes, I got tired pulling
the chip from the programmer and I want to test ICSP. I found some
docs to the microchip site and on the internet. But, it is not very
clear for me how to implement this ICSP.

Do I need to complete some special requirements to be able to use ICSP?
Do I need to solder some extra components on the board, those
components being used later by ICSP?
Do I need to disconnect some pins of the PIC when I start ICSP?
Do I need to power up the PIC from the supply on the board, or is the
programmer supply enough?

Is this ICSP circuit just a simple connection of the programming pins
of the PIC and doens't matter if the other pins are connected?

I need only good solutions aproved by Microchip standards, maybe a link.

Thanks



> Do I need to complete some special requirements to be able to
> use ICSP?

read http://www.voti.nl/swp and http://www.voti.nl/wisp628

> I need only good solutions aproved by Microchip standards,
> maybe a link.

Read the programming specification of the chip you are using.

Maybe check the circuit of the Microchip demo boards.

Wouter van Ooijen

-- -------
Van Ooijen Technische Informatica: www.voti.nl
consultancy, development, PICmicro products


Hello,

This link should give you good idea about ICSP connection. Please note that
13.5V is used for programming. Second option is to use Low Voltage ICSP.
Check Data Sheet for details. You should look for following:
1. Electrical Characteristics > Memory Programming Requirements
2. Special Features of the CPU > In-Circuit Serial Programming
3. Special Features of the CPU > Low-Voltage ICSP Programming
You should also check other related topics like configuration bits etc. On
Microchip web site you can find Application Notes that describe this topic,
too.

Link:
http://www.mikroelektronika.co.yu/english/product/tools/picflashrs232.htm

Regards,
Igor

----- Original Message -----
From: "ydexter" <>
To: <>
Sent: 06.04.2004. 9:55 AM
Subject: [piclist] ICSP thing > Hello,
>
> I saw people are talking about ICSP for PICs. Yes, I got tired pulling
> the chip from the programmer and I want to test ICSP. I found some
> docs to the microchip site and on the internet. But, it is not very
> clear for me how to implement this ICSP.
>
> Do I need to complete some special requirements to be able to use ICSP?
> Do I need to solder some extra components on the board, those
> components being used later by ICSP?
> Do I need to disconnect some pins of the PIC when I start ICSP?
> Do I need to power up the PIC from the supply on the board, or is the
> programmer supply enough?
>
> Is this ICSP circuit just a simple connection of the programming pins
> of the PIC and doens't matter if the other pins are connected?
>
> I need only good solutions aproved by Microchip standards, maybe a link.
>
> Thanks >
>
> to unsubscribe, go to http://www.yahoogroups.com and follow the
instructions
> Yahoo! Groups Links



You can check out Microchip's own application notes on implementing ICSP at:
 
http://www.microchip.com/1010/suppdoc/appnote/func/algorhyth/icsp/index.htm
 
The application note for the 16F8x gives a clear description of what is required.
 
http://www.microchip.com/download/appnote/pic16/91016b.pdf
 
 
Regards,
Eugene
 
----- Original Message -----
From: ydexter
To: p...@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Tuesday, 06 April, 2004 3:55 PM
Subject: [piclist] ICSP thing

Hello,

I saw people are talking about ICSP for PICs. Yes, I got tired pulling
the chip from the programmer and I want to test ICSP. I found some
docs to the microchip site and on the internet. But, it is not very
clear for me how to implement this ICSP.

Do I need to complete some special requirements to be able to use ICSP?
Do I need to solder some extra components on the board, those
components being used later by ICSP?
Do I need to disconnect some pins of the PIC when I start ICSP?
Do I need to power up the PIC from the supply on the board, or is the
programmer supply enough?

Is this ICSP circuit just a simple connection of the programming pins
of the PIC and doens't matter if the other pins are connected?

I need only good solutions aproved by Microchip standards, maybe a link.

Thanks



to unsubscribe, go to http://www.yahoogroups.com and follow the instructions

You wont regret going to ICSP. Pulling a chip to program it is a
PITA.

You will need some sort of a connector to bring the ICSP signals to
the chip (mclr, sdata, sclock, gnd and V+ optionally). There is a
microchip app note, IIRC... There is a standard 10 pin header which
is, frankly, a stupid waste of space when you have 4 (5 if you are
powering the pic from the programmer) pins that are used.

On the programming pins, clock and data are the main issues. If you
use the pin for I/O, you will need to isolate your circuitry from the
those pins. I generally use them for switches since its easy to
isolate them. Microchip is pretty unforthcoming as to how to
isolate. (on the other hand, Atmel actually has an apnote on this
topic with lots of examples).

Some one (wouter?) suggested the use of DIP CLIPs to clamp onto the
pins of a TH PIC. Hookup the programmer's header to the correct pins
on the DIP CLIP, clamp it on and program away. This is a great idea
if you are still using dips.

For SMT PICs, you will need a header of some sort. I some times just
creat little pads on the PCB which connect to appropriate ICSP pins.
I made a little board that has an ICSP header and spring contacts
that will connect to the ICSP pads. I attached the adaptor board to
a clothes pin and clip it on when I want to program the device.
Works great.

--- In , "ydexter" <ydexter@y...> wrote:
> Hello,
>
> I saw people are talking about ICSP for PICs. Yes, I got tired
pulling
> the chip from the programmer and I want to test ICSP. I found some
> docs to the microchip site and on the internet. But, it is not very
> clear for me how to implement this ICSP.
>
> Do I need to complete some special requirements to be able to use
ICSP?
> Do I need to solder some extra components on the board, those
> components being used later by ICSP?
> Do I need to disconnect some pins of the PIC when I start ICSP?
> Do I need to power up the PIC from the supply on the board, or is
the
> programmer supply enough?
>
> Is this ICSP circuit just a simple connection of the programming
pins
> of the PIC and doens't matter if the other pins are connected?
>
> I need only good solutions aproved by Microchip standards, maybe a
link.
>
> Thanks





Ydexter, now you are really dissapointing me.
ICSP is just a conector (SCLK, SD, Vpp, GND and optionaly VCC) between
your "supercalifragilistic" programmer
and the application containing the PIC. The only care must be the
load impedance on serial clock and serial data pins. And that depends
also on what true programmer you have.
I have pointed last time to some schematics about how looks the ICSP.
Fell free to search them.

top 10 wishes,
Vasile
http://surducan.netfirms.com On Tue, 6 Apr 2004, ydexter wrote:

> Hello,
>
> I saw people are talking about ICSP for PICs. Yes, I got tired pulling
> the chip from the programmer and I want to test ICSP. I found some
> docs to the microchip site and on the internet. But, it is not very
> clear for me how to implement this ICSP.
>
> Do I need to complete some special requirements to be able to use ICSP?
> Do I need to solder some extra components on the board, those
> components being used later by ICSP?
> Do I need to disconnect some pins of the PIC when I start ICSP?
> Do I need to power up the PIC from the supply on the board, or is the
> programmer supply enough?
>
> Is this ICSP circuit just a simple connection of the programming pins
> of the PIC and doens't matter if the other pins are connected?
>
> I need only good solutions aproved by Microchip standards, maybe a link.
>
> Thanks >
>
> to unsubscribe, go to http://www.yahoogroups.com and follow the instructions
> Yahoo! Groups Links