Forums

Looking for a bit of guidance

Started by Chr15 January 22, 2009
Hia, first time poster, long time fan of this site and its multiple links
to all things useful :)

Anyway, Ive been handed a project around the MPC5604P processor from
Freescale, with no documentation on it to speak of (in-fact it took me
about a week to derive the Freescale part number from its ST roots).  

I ended up getting the reference manual and data sheet, as well as a
debugger and what I think is the flasher in addition to getting my hands on
the Cosmic compiler (seems like its the only one that supports the VLE type
instruction set).

Anyway, to the point of my post, I've never dealt with a PPC processor let
alone one of this calibur, most of my dealings have been with smaller 8bit
PICs and the HC11; so naturally I have a few questions.

Is there anything specifically that I need in order to run code on this
other than just flashing the s record file to the processor (I think the
Cosomic compiler comes with a sample program that runs on the XPC56xxx eval
board which I'm getting my hands on soon)?  I specifically mean any boot
files that I need to load in order to start the processor up, or will the
compiler do that for me? 

In addition, is there any documentation anyone knows of on how to utilize
the FlexPWM utility on it or the interrupt vectors on it, also possibly a
library thats available for the FlexPWM or CAN or even the ADC?

I know these are kind of vague but I appreciate you guys even reading it,
and look forward to your responses.


Chr15 wrote:
> Hia, first time poster, long time fan of this site and its multiple links > to all things useful :) >
This is not a website, it's a Usenet newsgroup (look up these terms in wikipedia).
> Anyway, Ive been handed a project around the MPC5604P processor from > Freescale, with no documentation on it to speak of (in-fact it took me > about a week to derive the Freescale part number from its ST roots). >
My first recommendation is to hand the project back. You are *way* out of your depth here, and need a lot more help than some advice in a newsgroup. The Freescale MPC5xxx microcontrollers are a very different league from small 8-bit PICs - they are much more powerful, and much more complex. And assuming that the chip is appropriate to the task in hand, the software and hardware for this project will be far beyond anything using a PIC. Try to get on some sort of course regarding these devices, and expect to spend a long time learning about them. Also expect a great deal of frustration and battles as you try to get your programs working and find that there are lots of small details that you don't have to think about for small microcontrollers. Of course, if you have the time and money to spend getting up to speed, they are fun devices.
Thanks Dave for your response.

>Chr15 wrote: >This is not a website, it's a Usenet newsgroup (look up these terms in >wikipedia).
I was really referring to embeddedrelated.com and the links they provide to said lists, but thanks for clarifying for me! :)
>My first recommendation is to hand the project back. You are *way* out >of your depth here, and need a lot more help than some advice in a >newsgroup. The Freescale MPC5xxx microcontrollers are a very different >league from small 8-bit PICs - they are much more powerful, and much >more complex. And assuming that the chip is appropriate to the task in >hand, the software and hardware for this project will be far beyond >anything using a PIC. > >Try to get on some sort of course regarding these devices, and expect to
>spend a long time learning about them. Also expect a great deal of >frustration and battles as you try to get your programs working and find
>that there are lots of small details that you don't have to think about >for small microcontrollers. > >Of course, if you have the time and money to spend getting up to speed, >they are fun devices.
I hear everything your saying. But, sadly, I don't have the option of just simply, 'handing' the chip back, or I would as this chip is way over designed for what it was chosen for (AD measurements, PI Phase shifting of a PWM wave, and CAN) and would pick something a simpler and more apt to the job at hand (the goal of which is to create charging device). The reason I came here in the was in search of information on the exact same topics you've described, Google returns plenty of results for the AVR, PIC, HC11/12, ARM, and even FPGA's but not a ton for this specific micocontroller. You'll have to excuse me if I've overstepped my bounds by asking here.
On Jan 23, 6:57 am, "Chr15" <csema...@gmail.com> wrote:
> Thanks Dave for your response. > > >Chr15 wrote: > >This is not a website, it's a Usenet newsgroup (look up these terms in > >wikipedia). > > I was really referring to embeddedrelated.com and the links they provide > to said lists, but thanks for clarifying for me! :) > > > > >My first recommendation is to hand the project back. You are *way* out > >of your depth here, and need a lot more help than some advice in a > >newsgroup. The Freescale MPC5xxx microcontrollers are a very different > >league from small 8-bit PICs - they are much more powerful, and much > >more complex. And assuming that the chip is appropriate to the task in > >hand, the software and hardware for this project will be far beyond > >anything using a PIC. > > >Try to get on some sort of course regarding these devices, and expect to > >spend a long time learning about them. Also expect a great deal of > >frustration and battles as you try to get your programs working and find > >that there are lots of small details that you don't have to think about > >for small microcontrollers. > > >Of course, if you have the time and money to spend getting up to speed, > >they are fun devices. > > I hear everything your saying. But, sadly, I don't have the option of > just simply, 'handing' the chip back, or I would as this chip is way over > designed for what it was chosen for (AD measurements, PI Phase shifting of > a PWM wave, and CAN) and would pick something a simpler and more apt to the > job at hand (the goal of which is to create charging device). > > The reason I came here in the was in search of information on the exact > same topics you've described, Google returns plenty of results for the AVR, > PIC, HC11/12, ARM, and even FPGA's but not a ton for this specific > micocontroller. > > You'll have to excuse me if I've overstepped my bounds by asking here.
We use the 5xxx processors everywhere, I would suggest buying an eval board, most of your questions (and ones you haven't thought of yet) will be answered quickly just getting the eval board up an running (which should be very quick) and looking at the sample code provided. The freescale forums are where you need to be http://forums.freescale.com/freescale/board?board.id=MCUCOMM
On Fri, 23 Jan 2009 08:57:30 -0600, Chr15 wrote:

> Thanks Dave for your response. > >>Chr15 wrote: >>This is not a website, it's a Usenet newsgroup (look up these terms in >>wikipedia). > > > I was really referring to embeddedrelated.com and the links they provide > to said lists, but thanks for clarifying for me! :) > >>My first recommendation is to hand the project back. You are *way* out >>of your depth here, and need a lot more help than some advice in a >>newsgroup. The Freescale MPC5xxx microcontrollers are a very different >>league from small 8-bit PICs - they are much more powerful, and much >>more complex. And assuming that the chip is appropriate to the task in >>hand, the software and hardware for this project will be far beyond >>anything using a PIC. >> >>Try to get on some sort of course regarding these devices, and expect to > >>spend a long time learning about them. Also expect a great deal of >>frustration and battles as you try to get your programs working and find > >>that there are lots of small details that you don't have to think about >>for small microcontrollers. >> >>Of course, if you have the time and money to spend getting up to speed, >>they are fun devices. > > I hear everything your saying. But, sadly, I don't have the option of > just simply, 'handing' the chip back, or I would as this chip is way > over designed for what it was chosen for (AD measurements, PI Phase > shifting of a PWM wave, and CAN) and would pick something a simpler and > more apt to the job at hand (the goal of which is to create charging > device). > > The reason I came here in the was in search of information on the exact > same topics you've described, Google returns plenty of results for the > AVR, PIC, HC11/12, ARM, and even FPGA's but not a ton for this specific > micocontroller. > > You'll have to excuse me if I've overstepped my bounds by asking here.
You're not out of bounds for the group, David was just pointing out that a 32-bit RISC processor is considerably different from a PIC. So, be warned and change jobs, or be warned and expect to work hard for a bit. -- http://www.wescottdesign.com
Chr15 wrote:
> Thanks Dave for your response. > >> Chr15 wrote: >> This is not a website, it's a Usenet newsgroup (look up these terms in >> wikipedia). > > > I was really referring to embeddedrelated.com and the links they provide > to said lists, but thanks for clarifying for me! :) > >> My first recommendation is to hand the project back. You are *way* out >> of your depth here, and need a lot more help than some advice in a >> newsgroup. The Freescale MPC5xxx microcontrollers are a very different >> league from small 8-bit PICs - they are much more powerful, and much >> more complex. And assuming that the chip is appropriate to the task in >> hand, the software and hardware for this project will be far beyond >> anything using a PIC. >> >> Try to get on some sort of course regarding these devices, and expect to > >> spend a long time learning about them. Also expect a great deal of >> frustration and battles as you try to get your programs working and find > >> that there are lots of small details that you don't have to think about >> for small microcontrollers. >> >> Of course, if you have the time and money to spend getting up to speed, >> they are fun devices. > > I hear everything your saying. But, sadly, I don't have the option of > just simply, 'handing' the chip back, or I would as this chip is way over > designed for what it was chosen for (AD measurements, PI Phase shifting of > a PWM wave, and CAN) and would pick something a simpler and more apt to the > job at hand (the goal of which is to create charging device). > > The reason I came here in the was in search of information on the exact > same topics you've described, Google returns plenty of results for the AVR, > PIC, HC11/12, ARM, and even FPGA's but not a ton for this specific > micocontroller. > > You'll have to excuse me if I've overstepped my bounds by asking here. >
Your post is entirely on-topic for this newsgroup (though the title is a little vague). And once you have more specific questions, you have a good chance of getting helpful answers here. However, you should note that there is good reason for there being limited information about the mpc5xxx, and limited response to your questions and posts. These devices are not particularly widespread - there are few developers that use them. Those that *do* use them are often in companies that have longer term projects with larger development groups, and most of their questions and information are held within these groups - the automotive industry is a prime example, and a major user of these devices. The other chips you mentioned are much more common among smaller developers and hobby developers, so there tends to be a lot more sharing of information and questions. This is why your are more likely to find the information you need from "professional" sources - training courses, and information and examples coming with expensive commercial development tools and evaluation boards, rather than "amateur" or "low-cost" sources such as web pages, hobby boards, and so on. Depending on how far the project has come so far, you should be trying to do a cost-benefit analysis as to whether to continue using this chip, or moving to a different architecture. The mpc5xxx are expensive devices, and expensive for development. If you need the features (such as the TPU units), they are excellent value for money, but if not, you are better off with an alternative.
In message <tb-dnaZ_9ufeS-TUnZ2dnUVZ8vqdnZ2d@lyse.net>, David Brown 
<david.brown@hesbynett.removethisbit.no> writes
>Chr15 wrote: >> Hia, first time poster, long time fan of this site and its multiple links >> to all things useful :) >> > >This is not a website, it's a Usenet newsgroup (look up these terms in >wikipedia). > >> Anyway, Ive been handed a project around the MPC5604P processor from >> Freescale, with no documentation on it to speak of (in-fact it took me >> about a week to derive the Freescale part number from its ST roots). > >My first recommendation is to hand the project back. You are *way* out >of your depth here, and need a lot more help than some advice in a >newsgroup.
That was my first thought too. A PPC is a hell of a system to learn if all you know are PICs and H8's. Who ever gave you this project is either an idiot or trying to get you fired. -- \/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\ \/\/\/\/\ Chris Hills Staffs England /\/\/\/\/ \/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/
In message <Bs6dnaTks4JHR-TUnZ2dnUVZ_tninZ2d@giganews.com>, Chr15 
<csemanso@gmail.com> writes
> > >I hear everything your saying. But, sadly, I don't have the option of >just simply, 'handing' the chip back,
Why?
> or I would as this chip is way over >designed for what it was chosen for (AD measurements, PI Phase shifting >of >a PWM wave, and CAN) and would pick something a simpler and more apt to >the >job at hand (the goal of which is to create charging device).
Then you MUST tell them that this is the WRONG CHIP for this and it is going to be far too expensive. Have you any idea of the cost of a PPC part compared to an PIC or small AVR? What are the intended production quantities for this project?
>The reason I came here in the was in search of information on the exact >same topics you've described, Google returns plenty of results for the >AVR, >PIC, HC11/12, ARM, and even FPGA's but not a ton for this specific >micocontroller. >You'll have to excuse me if I've overstepped my bounds by asking here.
Not at all. This IS the place to ask. -- \/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\ \/\/\/\/\ Chris Hills Staffs England /\/\/\/\/ \/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/
In message 
<ebf7d25b-42ce-4478-8be3-ae8c5d990dcb@w1g2000prk.googlegroups.com>, 
steve <bungalow_steve@yahoo.com> writes
>On Jan 23, 6:57 am, "Chr15" <csema...@gmail.com> wrote: >>re. > >We use the 5xxx processors everywhere, I would suggest buying an eval >board, most of your questions (and ones you haven't thought of yet) >will be answered quickly just getting the eval board up an running >(which should be very quick) and looking at the sample code provided. >The freescale forums are where you need to be >http://forums.freescale.com/freescale/board?board.id=MCUCOMM
Do you have any connection to Freescale or ST? The PPC parts are wonderful parts and very powerful I have used them, The part seems a bad fit for the job in hand. -- \/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\ \/\/\/\/\ Chris Hills Staffs England /\/\/\/\/ \/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/
In message <MIudndHpR67NtubUnZ2dnUVZ8vidnZ2d@lyse.net>, David Brown 
<david.brown@hesbynett.removethisbit.no> writes
>However, you should note that there is good reason for there being >limited information about the mpc5xxx, and limited response to your >questions and posts. These devices are not particularly widespread - >there are few developers that use them.
I would not agree there... In some industries it is very widely used.
> Those that *do* use them are often in companies that have longer term >projects with larger development groups, and most of their questions >and information are held within these groups - the automotive industry >is a prime example, and a major user of these devices. The other chips >you mentioned are much more common among smaller developers and hobby >developers, so there tends to be a lot more sharing of information and >questions. This is why your are more likely to find the information >you need from "professional" sources - training courses, and >information and examples coming with expensive commercial development >tools and evaluation boards, rather than "amateur" or "low-cost" >sources such as web pages, hobby boards, and so on.
I agree. Most people using PPC are in large(r) companies have direct contacts in Freescale and ST.
>Depending on how far the project has come so far, you should be trying >to do a cost-benefit analysis as to whether to continue using this >chip, or moving to a different architecture. The mpc5xxx are expensive >devices, and expensive for development.
Quite so. I would recommend a cost benefit analysis. Take your time rushing in now could be a fatal and expensive mistake.
> If you need the features (such as the TPU units), they are excellent >value for money, but if not, you are better off with an alternative.
There is only one TPU compiler available AFAIK (se stock them :- ) and the TPU is a specialist area on it's own. -- \/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\ \/\/\/\/\ Chris Hills Staffs England /\/\/\/\/ \/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/