Forums

microcontroller (with A/D) that's easy to use in a prototype

Started by Matt March 30, 2009
I'm trying to choose a microcontroller for a pretty simple control 
system.  It seems like there are about a million models available, so 
I'm hoping for some help in narrowing down my choices.

I've been using the Atmel AT89LP2052, which would be fine except that it 
doesn't have A/D---it only has a voltage comparator.

The device has to be easy to use in a prototype.  I guess that means it 
should be available in a version that has through-hole pins 1/10 inch 
apart so I can insert it right into a breadboard.

It will have to read a voltage signal that varies from 0.5 to 4.5 VDC, 
and convert that to a digital signal of say 8 bits.  Besides that it 
will need to handle a few discrete inputs and outputs.

It should be able to run on a single 5V supply.

It should have a good free compiler available.

Any recommendations offhand?  Thanks.
On Sun, 29 Mar 2009 22:00:50 -0500, Matt
<matt@themattfella.xxxyyz.com> wrote:

>I'm trying to choose a microcontroller for a pretty simple control >system. It seems like there are about a million models available, so >I'm hoping for some help in narrowing down my choices. > >I've been using the Atmel AT89LP2052, which would be fine except that it >doesn't have A/D---it only has a voltage comparator. > >The device has to be easy to use in a prototype. I guess that means it >should be available in a version that has through-hole pins 1/10 inch >apart so I can insert it right into a breadboard. > >It will have to read a voltage signal that varies from 0.5 to 4.5 VDC, >and convert that to a digital signal of say 8 bits. Besides that it >will need to handle a few discrete inputs and outputs. > >It should be able to run on a single 5V supply. > >It should have a good free compiler available. > >Any recommendations offhand? Thanks.
This table lists the Atmel 8051 products - the first 8 have ADC AFAICT. http://www.atmel.com/dyn/products/param_table.asp?family_id=604&OrderBy=1499&Direction=DESC# Unfortunately, none of them seems to be available in through-hole packaging. If it doesn't need to be 8051 compatible, maybe check out e.g. the ATMega microcontrollers, e.g. the ATMega 8? http://www.atmel.com/dyn/resources/prod_documents/doc2486.pdf Depending on your definition of "a few" :-) even one of the ATTiny chips may fit the bill. They both have ADC, a free compiler (e.g. gcc) available on various platforms (Linux, Mac, Windows), and should be available in through-hole packaging. I'm just a hobbyist, but found these to be easy to use in a prototype. Regards, Gilles.
On Mar 30, 3:00=A0pm, Matt <m...@themattfella.xxxyyz.com> wrote:
> I'm trying to choose a microcontroller for a pretty simple control > system. =A0It seems like there are about a million models available, so > I'm hoping for some help in narrowing down my choices. > > I've been using the Atmel AT89LP2052, which would be fine except that it > doesn't have A/D---it only has a voltage comparator. > > The device has to be easy to use in a prototype. =A0I guess that means it > should be available in a version that has through-hole pins 1/10 inch > apart so I can insert it right into a breadboard. > > It will have to read a voltage signal that varies from 0.5 to 4.5 VDC, > and convert that to a digital signal of say 8 bits. =A0Besides that it > will need to handle a few discrete inputs and outputs. > > It should be able to run on a single 5V supply. > > It should have a good free compiler available. > > Any recommendations offhand? =A0Thanks.
The AT89C5115 and AT89C51CCO2 come in PLCC28 packages, which is close to Bread-Board compliant - stocked at Digikey. SiLabs and NXP have DIP analog, but not also in 5V Nuvoton have a number, but with MOQs at Digikey. -jg
Matt wrote:

> I'm trying to choose a microcontroller for a pretty simple control > system. It seems like there are about a million models available, so > I'm hoping for some help in narrowing down my choices. > > I've been using the Atmel AT89LP2052, which would be fine except that it > doesn't have A/D---it only has a voltage comparator. > > The device has to be easy to use in a prototype. I guess that means it > should be available in a version that has through-hole pins 1/10 inch > apart so I can insert it right into a breadboard. > > It will have to read a voltage signal that varies from 0.5 to 4.5 VDC, > and convert that to a digital signal of say 8 bits. Besides that it > will need to handle a few discrete inputs and outputs. > > It should be able to run on a single 5V supply. > > It should have a good free compiler available. > > Any recommendations offhand? Thanks.
The PIC16F870 is available in a 28-DIP package: http://search.digikey.com/scripts/DkSearch/dksus.dll?Cat=2556109 The IDE is free, with which you can even simulate the target microcontroller with your program running in it, and the lite version of the HI-TECH C compiler is free: http://www.htsoft.com/microchip/products/compilers/piccpro-modes.php But there are many other nice microcontrollers, if you don't limit yourself to DIP. You can use a breadboard adapter for development, e.g. from eBay: http://tinyurl.com/smd-adapter -- Frank Buss, fb@frank-buss.de http://www.frank-buss.de, http://www.it4-systems.de
On Mar 30, 6:57=A0pm, -jg <Jim.Granvi...@gmail.com> wrote:
> > The AT89C5115 and AT89C51CCO2 come in PLCC28 packages, which is close > to Bread-Board compliant - stocked at Digikey. > =A0SiLabs and NXP have DIP analog, but not also in 5V > Nuvoton have a number, but with MOQs at Digikey.
I also see TOOLSTICK502DC & TOOLSTICK582DC are fresh in stock at Digikey - those are small $10 PCBs, with mounted SMD controllers - the new F5xx series are 5V operation, and on-chip debug is included. 50 MIPS parts & 12b ADCs , so better for new designs... -jg
In article <FBWzl.127270$RJ7.79803@newsfe18.iad>, 
matt@themattfella.xxxyyz.com says...
> I'm trying to choose a microcontroller for a pretty simple control > system. It seems like there are about a million models available, so > I'm hoping for some help in narrowing down my choices. > > I've been using the Atmel AT89LP2052, which would be fine except that it > doesn't have A/D---it only has a voltage comparator. > > The device has to be easy to use in a prototype. I guess that means it > should be available in a version that has through-hole pins 1/10 inch > apart so I can insert it right into a breadboard. > > It will have to read a voltage signal that varies from 0.5 to 4.5 VDC, > and convert that to a digital signal of say 8 bits. Besides that it > will need to handle a few discrete inputs and outputs. > > It should be able to run on a single 5V supply. > > It should have a good free compiler available. > > Any recommendations offhand? Thanks. >
AVR/Arduino like you can find here. Great platform for development, software is free. http://www.circuitgizmos.com/products/cgbbb/cgbbb.shtml http://www.circuitgizmos.com/products/cgbookgoodie/cgbookgoodie.shtml http://www.arduino.cc/ http://www.moderndevice.com/
Matt wrote:
> > I'm trying to choose a microcontroller for a pretty simple control > system. It seems like there are about a million models available, > so I'm hoping for some help in narrowing down my choices. > > I've been using the Atmel AT89LP2052, which would be fine except > that it doesn't have A/D---it only has a voltage comparator. > > The device has to be easy to use in a prototype. I guess that > means it should be available in a version that has through-hole > pins 1/10 inch apart so I can insert it right into a breadboard. > > It will have to read a voltage signal that varies from 0.5 to 4.5 > VDC, and convert that to a digital signal of say 8 bits. Besides > that it will need to handle a few discrete inputs and outputs. > > It should be able to run on a single 5V supply. > > It should have a good free compiler available. > > Any recommendations offhand? Thanks.
You don't specify the speed and accuracy required. I assume 8 bit accuracy is sufficient, and there are roughly a million available A/D and D/A 8 bit subsystems available. You can use a D/A with a comparator, and about 2 microseconds per bit (or faster). This is probably the cheapest. -- [mail]: Chuck F (cbfalconer at maineline dot net) [page]: <http://cbfalconer.home.att.net> Try the download section.
On 30/03/2009 Matt wrote:

Another vote here for the AVR ATmega8. It's very easy to get started
and comes in 28 pin 0.3" DIP, with 6 off 10-bit ADC channels, plenty of
IO and a USART for serial comms. You can also get a C compiler from
Imagecraft which is a free download and will be fully functional for 30
days, after which it limits your code space, but will still work with
the ATmega8.

You'll also need an ISP and the Atmel Mk2 (USB) one is very cheap.

-- 
John B
"John B" <spamj_baraclough@blockerzetnet.co.uk> wrote in message 
news:49d14868$0$17706$4c56ba96@master.news.zetnet.net...
> On 30/03/2009 Matt wrote: > > Another vote here for the AVR ATmega8. It's very easy to get started > and comes in 28 pin 0.3" DIP, with 6 off 10-bit ADC channels, plenty of > IO and a USART for serial comms. You can also get a C compiler from > Imagecraft which is a free download and will be fully functional for 30 > days, after which it limits your code space, but will still work with > the ATmega8. > > You'll also need an ISP and the Atmel Mk2 (USB) one is very cheap. > > -- > John B
If you're starting out, chose the mega 48, an upgraded mega 8.Even more features, especially if you want low power-<1 uA stby.... + self programming flash.