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WTB: EPROM Emulator for 2716

Started by TXMarsh September 30, 2010
Does anyone have an emulator for a 2716 eprom that they no longer have
a use for?
In the alternative, does anyone know if anyone is still making these?
Thanks.
Tim
On Thu, 30 Sep 2010 17:36:50 -0700 (PDT), TXMarsh
<timothymarsh@gmail.com> wrote:

>Does anyone have an emulator for a 2716 eprom that they no longer have >a use for? >In the alternative, does anyone know if anyone is still making these? >Thanks.
I don't. I think I might still have some 2716's, though. Are you looking here for something you can download code into and test, without the UV erasure step? Or something more complex than that? Those things are a 'mere' 2k byte and 450ns cycle times, I think. One could almost make one of those from a cheap micro in today's world; with a socket conversion, anyway. But no emulator laying about, despite the fact that I have a lot of old stuff hanging on shelves. Sorry. Jon
Thanks for looking Jon!  Yep... just trying to avoid having to burn,
UV erase and burn again.
I thought about making my own with a propeller micro but I need to
start being more careful about "project creep."
That is, it always seems that I have an idea to do something (in this
case design a test rig with custom software for a 6800 based pinball
machine) and then I decide I could do the project more efficiently if
only I build another widget first.
I would also be interested in most any tool that works with the
motorola 6800/6802/6808.  I've been on a real retro-computing kick...
reading too many old issues of BYTE!
tim
On Thu, 30 Sep 2010 18:42:43 -0700, Jon Kirwan <jonk@infinitefactors.org> wrote:
>On Thu, 30 Sep 2010 17:36:50 -0700 (PDT), TXMarsh ><timothymarsh@gmail.com> wrote:
>>Does anyone have an emulator for a 2716 eprom that they no longer have >>a use for? >>In the alternative, does anyone know if anyone is still making these? >>Thanks.
>I don't. I think I might still have some 2716's, though.
>Are you looking here for something you can download code into >and test, without the UV erasure step? Or something more >complex than that?
When were those in use, 30 years ago?
> When were those in use, 30 years ago? =A0
Yep... that's about right. This particular pinball machine is from around 1986... and the 6808 wasn't exactly new at that point. : )
On Thu, 30 Sep 2010 19:16:37 -0700 (PDT), TXMarsh
<timothymarsh@gmail.com> wrote:

>Thanks for looking Jon! Yep... just trying to avoid having to burn, >UV erase and burn again.
Okay. Figured.
>I thought about making my own with a propeller micro but I need to >start being more careful about "project creep." >That is, it always seems that I have an idea to do something (in this >case design a test rig with custom software for a 6800 based pinball >machine) and then I decide I could do the project more efficiently if >only I build another widget first.
Didn't you know? It's widgets all the way down!! Seems like that to me, anyway. ;)
>I would also be interested in most any tool that works with the >motorola 6800/6802/6808. I've been on a real retro-computing kick... >reading too many old issues of BYTE!
oh, my. Retro for me is more like core memory, drum memory, mercury delay line memory, front panels with soft but real switches that don't develop callouses when you use them to toggle in your programs, and if I move closer to the 6800 time line, maybe even some 1103 dynamic ram chips. Those 6800 things came slightly after, if I recall, but that's not too far away from old recollections. Hmm. I think the early ones were 1MHz. Might be able to emulate that, too, with another one of those widgets. ;) Where are you picking up 6800's? I have a few 8080A laying about... damn... now I'm going to have to go see if I have any more of the 6800's in the box. (Probably, if I do, the pins are going to need some cleaning.) Jon
On Thu, 30 Sep 2010 19:46:10 -0700 (PDT), TXMarsh
<timothymarsh@gmail.com> wrote:

>> When were those in use, 30 years ago? &#2013266080; > >Yep... that's about right. This particular pinball machine is from >around 1986... and the 6808 wasn't exactly new at that point. : )
Pinball!! Cool! We had a few pinball machines at home. My wife is .. well, it was very important to her that we had a few in the living room! However, no micros in those. Then we had kids and moving and jobs that took up 36 hours a day of my time and... well... We used to go, every week, to a pinball palace and buy up a fixed number of tokens and spend a few hours playing together (or separately.) Good luck reprogramming the thing! Should be a lot of joy. Jon
On Thu, 30 Sep 2010 17:36:50 -0700 (PDT), TXMarsh
<timothymarsh@gmail.com> wrote:

>Does anyone have an emulator for a 2716 eprom that they no longer have >a use for? >In the alternative, does anyone know if anyone is still making these? >Thanks. >Tim
Someone over in sci.electronics.basics and .design is asking: Subject: HDS-200 / Motorola 6800 Development tool Is there any interest out there in this (antique) development tool? I've got one (it takes up a lot of space!) that I would like to part with. Thanks, TomC Not sure if that is something you could use. Jon
On 1.10.10 3:36 , TXMarsh wrote:
> Does anyone have an emulator for a 2716 eprom that they no longer have > a use for? > In the alternative, does anyone know if anyone is still making these? > Thanks. > Tim
Get a small 5V Flash and make an adapter socket. You will not find anything too small or slow. IIRC, there were two kinds of 2716: one with supplies of +5V, +12V and -5V, and another with +5V only. -- Tauno Voipio
Hi Tim,

TXMarsh wrote:
> Does anyone have an emulator for a 2716 eprom that they no longer have > a use for?
I may have a spare 2716 ppod for one of my logic analyzers -- but you'd need the logic analyzer as well! :>
> In the alternative, does anyone know if anyone is still making these?
If you are looking for real 2716's, I can probably find a few (even 1702's!). I *think* all the 2716's were interchangeable (IIRC, the mess happened with TI in the 2732 series) -- aside from access times. If, OTOH, you are looking for a poor man's development tool, we used to use 2Kx8 SRAMs with a "write protect switch" epoxied (superglue didn't exist back then) to the top of the device. (this requires some forethought in laying out the PCB so you have access to a "write" signal) 4K parts (2732) were harder to fabricate in this manner as you had to piggy-back *two* 2K SRAMs, lift their CS legs and air-wire a small decoder mounted (legs up) on the top of the topmost SRAM. We called these "pigs" -- many early video games (arcade pieces) were developed this way. :> Sure beat the 30+ minute erase-burn-test cycles! You might even look for an integrated BBRAM with some external logic on the WE signal (or, just reload it each time you power up)