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start whit micro

Started by Silvanononvalevoleciccioli March 18, 2013
hi
I want to start with the micro, can you suggest some things
I think to arduino uno starter kit It's a good idea or not
thanks and bye
On Mon, 18 Mar 2013 13:15:11 +0100, Silvanononvalevoleciccioli
<giragira@dot.dot> wrote:

>hi >I want to start with the micro, can you suggest some things >I think to arduino uno starter kit It's a good idea or not >thanks and bye
The Arduino is a reasonable starting place. It has a lot of users around the world and many, many "shields" (add-on cards) for more functions. You'll eventually want to get to working with a bare microcontroller, where you will take care of setting up things like clocks and peripheral registers -- where it's just you, the user manual, and the chip. But an Arduino is a fairly painless introduction.
Hi Silvano(?)

Am 18.03.2013 13:15, schrieb Silvanononvalevoleciccioli:
> I want to start with the micro, can you suggest some things > I think to arduino uno starter kit It's a good idea or not > thanks and bye
"mbed" [ http://www.mbed.org ] Would be another option... * No need for dedicated toolchains but standard C (or even C++) programming. * More than one architecture/manufacturer available with the same (eco-)system. HTH. Salut, J"org
On Monday, March 18, 2013 8:15:11 AM UTC-4, Silvanononvalevoleciccioli wrote:
> I want to start with the micro, can you suggest some things > I think to arduino uno starter kit It's a good idea or not.
Arduino is a good starting point to experiment with microcontrollers and get something working fast. So if this is your goal, I would highly recommend it. However, if your goal is to really learn about programming microcontrollers and how they really work inside, I think that you need a proper debugger to see the disassebled code, to be able to examine the CPU registers, to see the content of memory, the stack, and various special registers. Arduino does NOT provide this capability, because Arduino does not give you the built-in J-Tag debugger. So, here is my list of inexpensive self-contained boards with built-in J-Tag debugger. All of them are based on ARM Cortex-M, which is the most popular CPU architecture in microcontrollers today and for the foreseeable future. Please note that some of them are much cheaper than Arduino UNO: 1. Stellaris Launchpad from TI (http://www.ti.com/ww/en/launchpad/stellaris_head.html) $12.99, Cortex-M4F 2. LPCXpresso boards from NXP (http://ics.nxp.com/lpcxpresso/), around $30, Cortex-M0, Cortrex-M3 3. STM32 discovery from ST (http://www.st.com/internet/evalboard/product/252419.jsp) $14.99, Cortex-M4F 4. Freedom FRDM-KL25Z from Freescale (freescale.com/FRDM-KL25Z), Cortex-M0+ From these boards, my favorite is the Stellaris Launchpad with the latest Cortex-M4F CPU. In fact, I'm using this board in my YouTube video course "Embedded Systems Programming Course" available at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3V9eqvkMzHA&list=PLPW8O6W-1chwyTzI3BHwBLbGQoPFxPAPM Miro Samek state-machine.com
>>>>> Joerg Schmitz-Linneweber <joerg@schmitz-linneweber.name> writes: >>>>> Am 18.03.2013 13:15, schrieb Silvanononvalevoleciccioli:
[Cross-posting to news:comp.lang.c.] >> I want to start with the micro, can you suggest some things I think >> to arduino uno starter kit It's a good idea or not thanks and bye > "mbed" [ http://www.mbed.org ] Would be another option... > * No need for dedicated toolchains but standard C (or even C++) > programming. Indeed, I've just discovered that they use a specific "Arduino" (e. g., [1]) language for the "sketches." The question is: how this language is different from C (it surely looks "C-like" enough), and is there any reason to prefer it over the latter, even if only for 8-bit AVR programming? TIA. [1] https://github.com/languages/Arduino [...] -- FSF associate member #7257
>>>>> Joerg Schmitz-Linneweber <joerg@schmitz-linneweber.name> writes: >>>>> Am 18.03.2013 13:15, schrieb Silvanononvalevoleciccioli:
[Cross-posting to news:comp.infosystems.www.misc, for the Web sites mentioned express a behavior that doesn't seem all that sensible.] >> I want to start with the micro, can you suggest some things I think >> to arduino uno starter kit It's a good idea or not thanks and bye > "mbed" [ http://www.mbed.org ] Any idea why this site (or, rather, http://mbed.org/ it redirects to) reports 403 Forbidden when there's User-Agent: Lynx... in the HTTP request header? Also strange is that http://www.wescottdesign.com/ results in 406 Not Acceptable in such a case... (No big deal, obviously: Lynx can be configured to send whatever User-Agent: the user desires. Or to send none at all.) > Would be another option... > * No need for dedicated toolchains but standard C (or even C++) > programming. > * More than one architecture/manufacturer available with the same > (eco-)system. Aren't Arduino boards "free hardware" (as in freedom)? Isn't anyone thus permitted to produce them, or compatible ones? (ISTR, that I've seen some at Olimex.) -- FSF associate member #7257
On Tue, 19 Mar 2013 16:02:52 -0700 (PDT), info@quantum-leaps.com
wrote:

>On Monday, March 18, 2013 8:15:11 AM UTC-4, Silvanononvalevoleciccioli wrote: >> I want to start with the micro, can you suggest some things >> I think to arduino uno starter kit It's a good idea or not. > >Arduino is a good starting point to experiment with microcontrollers and get something working fast. So if this is your goal, I would highly recommend it. > >However, if your goal is to really learn about programming microcontrollers and how they really work inside, I think that you need a proper debugger to see the disassebled code, to be able to examine the CPU registers, to see the content of memory, the stack, and various special registers. Arduino does NOT provide this capability, because Arduino does not give you the built-in J-Tag debugger. > >So, here is my list of inexpensive self-contained boards with built-in J-Tag debugger. All of them are based on ARM Cortex-M, which is the most popular CPU architecture in microcontrollers today and for the foreseeable future. Please note that some of them are much cheaper than Arduino UNO:
The Cortex-M processors are my own go-to choice nowadays. Nevertheless, I would not recommend them as a typical user's first "bare" microcontroller. Better to go with something like an AVR ATmega328 in DIP form-factor. Cheap, understandable, bread-boardable. There is also a choice of free (libre) and free (for non-commercial use) compilers, e.g., https://www.imagecraft.com/

"Ivan Shmakov" <oneingray@gmail.com> wrote in message 
news:87zjxydqtn.fsf_-_@violet.siamics.net...
>>>>>> Joerg Schmitz-Linneweber <joerg@schmitz-linneweber.name> writes: >>>>>> Am 18.03.2013 13:15, schrieb Silvanononvalevoleciccioli: > > [Cross-posting to news:comp.lang.c.] > > >> I want to start with the micro, can you suggest some things I think > >> to arduino uno starter kit It's a good idea or not thanks and bye > > > "mbed" [ http://www.mbed.org ] Would be another option... > > > * No need for dedicated toolchains but standard C (or even C++) > > programming. > > Indeed, I've just discovered that they use a specific "Arduino" > (e. g., [1]) language for the "sketches." > > The question is: how this language is different from C (it > surely looks "C-like" enough), and is there any reason to prefer > it over the latter, even if only for 8-bit AVR programming?
I looked at this recently (http://arduino.cc/en/Reference/HomePage). Any resemblance to C is purely superficial (there don't seem to be any user functions for example). And in the implementation I saw, it just got converted to C behind the scenes (where I believe gcc was then used to compile to machine instructions). If you know C then just use that instead, if you can figure out how to use the tools. -- Bartc
On 20.3.13 6:02 , Rich Webb wrote:
> On Tue, 19 Mar 2013 16:02:52 -0700 (PDT), info@quantum-leaps.com > wrote: > >> On Monday, March 18, 2013 8:15:11 AM UTC-4, Silvanononvalevoleciccioli wrote: >>> I want to start with the micro, can you suggest some things >>> I think to arduino uno starter kit It's a good idea or not. >> >> Arduino is a good starting point to experiment with microcontrollers and get something working fast. So if this is your goal, I would highly recommend it. >> >> However, if your goal is to really learn about programming microcontrollers and how they really work inside, I think that you need a proper debugger to see the disassebled code, to be able to examine the CPU registers, to see the content of memory, the stack, and various special registers. Arduino does NOT provide this capability, because Arduino does not give you the built-in J-Tag debugger. >> >> So, here is my list of inexpensive self-contained boards with built-in J-Tag debugger. All of them are based on ARM Cortex-M, which is the most popular CPU architecture in microcontrollers today and for the foreseeable future. Please note that some of them are much cheaper than Arduino UNO: > > The Cortex-M processors are my own go-to choice nowadays. > Nevertheless, I would not recommend them as a typical user's first > "bare" microcontroller. Better to go with something like an AVR > ATmega328 in DIP form-factor. Cheap, understandable, bread-boardable. > There is also a choice of free (libre) and free (for non-commercial > use) compilers, e.g., https://www.imagecraft.com/
For moving later up to ARMs (including Cortexes), the avr-gcc might be a good chioce for a toolkit. AVRdude functions well for programming. IIRC, there are instructions how to integrate Eclipse and AVR GCC + tools, for the IDE people. -- Tauno Voipio
On Wed, 20 Mar 2013 18:40:59 +0200, Tauno Voipio
<tauno.voipio@notused.fi.invalid> wrote:

>On 20.3.13 6:02 , Rich Webb wrote: >> On Tue, 19 Mar 2013 16:02:52 -0700 (PDT), info@quantum-leaps.com >> wrote: >> >> The Cortex-M processors are my own go-to choice nowadays. >> Nevertheless, I would not recommend them as a typical user's first >> "bare" microcontroller. Better to go with something like an AVR >> ATmega328 in DIP form-factor. Cheap, understandable, bread-boardable. >> There is also a choice of free (libre) and free (for non-commercial >> use) compilers, e.g., https://www.imagecraft.com/ > > >For moving later up to ARMs (including Cortexes), the avr-gcc might >be a good chioce for a toolkit. AVRdude functions well for programming. > >IIRC, there are instructions how to integrate Eclipse and AVR GCC + >tools, for the IDE people.
Yes. I'd also thought about recommending WinAVR but from a quick check of the d/l page it looks like WinAVR stalled about three years ago. Doesn't Atmel's AVR Studio include the gcc toolchain, now? I'll admit that I haven't been keeping up with it -- still running Studio 4 for those rare occasions when I need it.