Forums

x86 architecture concepts

Started by Mouarf February 23, 2005
hello all,

could someone give me a good link on a page that describes the x86 
architecture main concepts and why it is so different from other 
architecture like ARM, PowerPC, alpha....? What are the main markets these 
architecture target to?


If you also could give me a good link to these architectures too I would be 
really pleased.


Thanks.



On Wed, 23 Feb 2005 13:22:37 +0100, Mouarf wrote:

> hello all, > > could someone give me a good link on a page that describes the x86 > architecture main concepts and why it is so different from other > architecture like ARM, PowerPC, alpha....? What are the main markets these > architecture target to? > > > If you also could give me a good link to these architectures too I would be > really pleased. > > > Thanks.
Try: www.google.com Once you have more specific questions, try again, but in a relevant newsgroup. And if it is homework (as this appears to be), say so - there are plenty of people on usenet willing to help you learn, but very few willing to do your homework for you.
Mouarf wrote:

> hello all, > > could someone give me a good link on a page that describes the x86 > architecture main concepts and why it is so different from other > architecture like ARM, PowerPC, alpha....? What are the main markets these > architecture target to? > > If you also could give me a good link to these architectures too I would be > really pleased.
Google ? Rene
If you do not have better answers, please don't answer or answer google with 
the relevant keywords....

If you feed google with words around x86 you get a jungle of irrelevant 
pages. My last homeworks date very far away and I'm sorry to inform you that 
the question is not trivial. Even if I was a student, of course all answers 
are available on the web, in this case, why usenet exists?

I asked about the concepts that characterize the x86 architecture (and also 
ARM, alpha...) not the instruction set and not the vendors of x86 stuff like 
google like to give.

I other terms, what x86 means? Idem for PowerPC, alpha.

Is this just a brand of Intel?

Is it a core that use the same instructions as the Intel 86 processors?

When we look for low power 32bit �C, why don't we say first x86 rather than 
ARM (what makes ARM architecture low power comparing x86)?


Best regards


"David" <david.nospam@westcontrol.removethis.com> schrieb im Newsbeitrag 
news:pan.2005.02.23.13.27.35.299000@westcontrol.removethis.com...
> On Wed, 23 Feb 2005 13:22:37 +0100, Mouarf wrote: > >> hello all, >> >> could someone give me a good link on a page that describes the x86 >> architecture main concepts and why it is so different from other >> architecture like ARM, PowerPC, alpha....? What are the main markets >> these >> architecture target to? >> >> >> If you also could give me a good link to these architectures too I would >> be >> really pleased. >> >> >> Thanks. > > Try: www.google.com > > Once you have more specific questions, try again, but in a relevant > newsgroup. > > And if it is homework (as this appears to be), say so - there are plenty > of people on usenet willing to help you learn, but very few willing to do > your homework for you. >
Mouarf wrote:
> > could someone give me a good link on a page that describes the x86 > architecture main concepts and why it is so different from other > architecture like ARM, PowerPC, alpha....? What are the main > markets these architecture target to? > > If you also could give me a good link to these architectures too I > would be really pleased.
It starts in the data sheets for the 8008 cpu, circa 1970. By 1973 we had the more or less mnemnonic compatible, register compatible, but not binary compatible, 8080 architecture. By about 1978 this had evolved into the mnemnonic and register but not binary compatible 8086. From then on binary compatibility has been maintained, and this is the primary reason for the wide use of the architecture today. Software costs more than hardware. I seem to recall that the fastest 8008 instruction required about 38 uSec. That's micro, not nano. It addressed a full 16 kByte memory space, 8 input ports and 16 output ports. It could not save its state on an interrupt, and had an inaccessible 8 deep call stack. -- Some informative links: news:news.announce.newusers http://www.geocities.com/nnqweb/ http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html http://www.caliburn.nl/topposting.html http://www.netmeister.org/news/learn2quote.html
according to you, x86 architecture is only an instruction set?

"CBFalconer" <cbfalconer@yahoo.com> schrieb im Newsbeitrag 
news:421C889C.94668038@yahoo.com...
> Mouarf wrote: >> >> could someone give me a good link on a page that describes the x86 >> architecture main concepts and why it is so different from other >> architecture like ARM, PowerPC, alpha....? What are the main >> markets these architecture target to? >> >> If you also could give me a good link to these architectures too I >> would be really pleased. > > It starts in the data sheets for the 8008 cpu, circa 1970. By 1973 > we had the more or less mnemnonic compatible, register compatible, > but not binary compatible, 8080 architecture. By about 1978 this > had evolved into the mnemnonic and register but not binary > compatible 8086. From then on binary compatibility has been > maintained, and this is the primary reason for the wide use of the > architecture today. Software costs more than hardware. > > I seem to recall that the fastest 8008 instruction required about > 38 uSec. That's micro, not nano. It addressed a full 16 kByte > memory space, 8 input ports and 16 output ports. It could not save > its state on an interrupt, and had an inaccessible 8 deep call > stack. > > -- > Some informative links: > news:news.announce.newusers > http://www.geocities.com/nnqweb/ > http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html > http://www.caliburn.nl/topposting.html > http://www.netmeister.org/news/learn2quote.html > >
On Wed, 23 Feb 2005 13:22:37 +0100, Mouarf <mouarf@chezmoi.fr> wrote:

> hello all, > > could someone give me a good link on a page that describes the x86 > architecture main concepts
http://www.x86.org/
> and why it is so different from other > architecture like ARM, PowerPC, alpha....?
Partly, because it was designed by a company other than those that designed ARM, PowerPC and Alpha. Partly, because x86 existed way before the said architectures.
> If you also could give me a good link to these architectures too I would > be really pleased.
ARM: http://www.arm.com PowerPC: http://www.ibm.com Alpha: http://www.dec.com (Some links might be obsolete) HTH, Vadim
"David" <david.nospam@westcontrol.removethis.com> wrote
> On Wed, 23 Feb 2005 13:22:37 +0100, Mouarf wrote: > > > why is [8086 acrhitecture] so different from other > > architecture like ARM, PowerPC, alpha....? What are the main markets these > > architecture target to?
> Try: www.google.com
> And if it is homework there are very few willing to do > your homework for you.
That's why they don't mention it's homework... After a good round of getting usenet to do the homework some folks then get a job and seem expect usenet to now do their job for them. -- Nicholas O. Lindan, Cleveland, Ohio Consulting Engineer: Electronics; Informatics; Photonics. To reply, remove spaces: n o lindan at ix . netcom . com psst.. want to buy an f-stop timer? nolindan.com/da/fstop/
>> and why it is so different from other >> architecture like ARM, PowerPC, alpha....? > > Partly, because it was designed by a company other than those that > designed ARM, PowerPC and Alpha. Partly, because x86 existed way before > the said architectures.
I'm not sure, see the PXA processor from Intel that use ARM architecture........
"Mouarf" <mouarf@chezmoi.fr> wrote in

> If you do not have better answers, please don't answer or answer google with > the relevant keywords....
No, Mouarf, you have it arse-backwards. It is up to _YOU_ to provide real questions, not your homework assignment. If this isn't your homework question, then your question appears to indicate you may not be qualified for the work you are doing. Go google -- what you _need_ to learn is how to limit searches so you only get the information you want. -- Nicholas O. Lindan, Cleveland, Ohio Consulting Engineer: Electronics; Informatics; Photonics. To reply, remove spaces: n o lindan at ix . netcom . com psst.. want to buy an f-stop timer? nolindan.com/da/fstop/