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Basic doubt about 8051 variants...

Started by Seemanta Dutta June 10, 2006
Hi,

I have this basic doubt about the terminology of 8051 variants.
I have read a couple of their data sheets and based on that
here's my understanding, please correct me if I am wrong:

8051  - ?? Probably generic name for the entire family, no part named as 
such. right?
87C51 - EPROM variant. So must have a quartz window.

89C51 - EEPROM/FLASH/ISP variant. No quartz window.

89SC51 - Same as 89C51, but with some extra power packed features

My main area of confusion is between 89C51 and 89S51.

Is my understanding of the above correct?

Hoping to hear from you soon.

regards,
Seemanta
On Sat, 10 Jun 2006 20:38:56 +0530, Seemanta Dutta
<noone@slashdevslashnull.net> wrote:

>Hi, > >I have this basic doubt about the terminology of 8051 variants. >I have read a couple of their data sheets and based on that >here's my understanding, please correct me if I am wrong:
>89SC51 - Same as 89C51, but with some extra power packed features > >My main area of confusion is between 89C51 and 89S51. > >Is my understanding of the above correct? >
For the Atmel parts I've used, both the 89C and 89S are electrically erasable. The 89C must be removed from the circuit for programming in an eprom programmer, but the 89S can be programmed in-circuit using a serial connection. -- Peter Bennett, VE7CEI peterbb4 (at) interchange.ubc.ca new newsgroup users info : http://vancouver-webpages.com/nnq GPS and NMEA info: http://vancouver-webpages.com/peter Vancouver Power Squadron: http://vancouver.powersquadron.ca
Seemanta Dutta wrote:

> I have this basic doubt about the terminology of 8051 variants.
<English lesson> This is a question, not a doubt. A doubt refers to a specific hypothesis, such as "I doubt it will rain today" meaning "I think it won't rain today." Sometimes the reference is vague, such as "He thinks his team will dominate, but I have my doubts." A doubt indicates that the doubter thinks that the hypothesis may be wrong, but is not sure. Sometimes one has "serious doubts" about a proposition when he is almost sure that it is incorrect. A question, in contrast, does not indicate an expectation. </English lesson>
> I have read a couple of their data sheets and based on that > here's my understanding, please correct me if I am wrong: > > 8051 - ?? Probably generic name for the entire family, no part named as > such. right?
I expect there was an original 8051 part, although it probably had variations for temperature, etc. Nowadays, it is used to indicate the large family of processors using the same instruction set.
> 87C51 - EPROM variant. So must have a quartz window. > 89C51 - EEPROM/FLASH/ISP variant. No quartz window.
Those sound right, in general.
> 89SC51 - Same as 89C51, but with some extra power packed features
As you get more specific, it makes sense to look at actual part numbers and their data sheets. Different manufacturers may have variations in their parts for the same basic number.
> My main area of confusion is between 89C51 and 89S51.
Find some specific parts and compare the data sheets to discover the differences. Google helps. -- Thad
Le Sat, 10 Jun 2006 20:38:56 +0530, Seemanta Dutta a &eacute;crit&nbsp;:

> Hi, > > I have this basic doubt about the terminology of 8051 variants. > I have read a couple of their data sheets and based on that > here's my understanding, please correct me if I am wrong: > > 8051 - ?? Probably generic name for the entire family, no part named as > such. right? > 87C51 - EPROM variant. So must have a quartz window. > > 89C51 - EEPROM/FLASH/ISP variant. No quartz window. > > 89SC51 - Same as 89C51, but with some extra power packed features > > My main area of confusion is between 89C51 and 89S51. > > Is my understanding of the above correct? > > Hoping to hear from you soon. > > regards, > Seemanta
Your question is more an Atmel question than an 8051 question. The S in the Atmel part means that the flash can be programmed using the SPI interface. For a more generic description of the 8051 here : 8051 was the original name of the microcontroller designed by Intel The actual family name is MCS 51 A of February 1994 the original parts from Intel were described this way Device name 8051AH Romless version : 8031AH Eprom Version 9751H,8751BH ROM bytes : 4k RAM bytes : 128 bytes 16-bit timers : 2 Ckt Type : HMOS Device name 8052AH Romless version : 8032AH Eprom Version 8752BH ROM bytes : 8k RAM bytes : 256 bytes 16-bit timers : 3 Ckt Type : HMOS Device name 80C51AH Romless version : 80C31AH Eprom Version 87C51 ROM bytes : 4k RAM bytes : 128 bytes 16-bit timers : 2 Ckt Type : CHMOS At that time Intel had the 8051 or 8052 variances either phased out or mostly phased out and replaced with their CHMOS replacements. All original devices worked only at +5V Intel has come up with a lot of variants including a low power part 80LC51FA which I have used in a device for the oil industry. Intel is very conservative with the specs and I have found this particular device to use less current than any of the PIC available in 1994. There has been several other companies making parts that are compatible with the MCS 51 family. The part number will vary from manufacturers as they choose the number they want. For instance ST's latest such device is uPSD34xx For example, the device I use is named uPSD3434EV-4046 Freq 40 Mhz 1st flash :256k 2nd flash : 32k SRAM : 8k GPIO :35 VCC : 3.3V Some of the features : USB port (Support V2.0) I2C master slave controller (833khz) SPI Master Controller (1Mhz) 2 UARTs IrDA Protocol : up to 115k baud 3 16 bit timers PCA, 6 16 bit modules PWM,CAPCOM and timers 8/10/16 bit PWM operation 12 interrupt sources JTAG debug Pkg : TQFP52 It would take a long time to list all the variants. If you need to know more you need to go to each manufacturer and read the data sheets that they provide. There are many who makes such devices. Atmel, Philips and ST being some of the biggest ones. One last note. The intel devices and many of the other sources ran at a maximum of 12mhz clock with a divider by 12. This gave you a running clock of 1Mhz. The ST device for examples runs at 40 Mhz with a divide by 4 instead of a divide by 12. Several other manufacturers have similar parts as far as speed is concerned. -- Tired of Microsoft's rebootive multitasking? then it's time to upgrade to Linux. http://home.comcast.net/~mcatudal We are the Cybernetic Entomology Experts

Seemanta Dutta wrote:

> Hi, > > I have this basic doubt about the terminology of 8051 variants. > I have read a couple of their data sheets and based on that > here's my understanding, please correct me if I am wrong: > > 8051 - ?? Probably generic name for the entire family, no part named as > such. right?
If mask ROM'd you might see one.
> 87C51 - EPROM variant. So must have a quartz window.
I have one here !
> 89C51 - EEPROM/FLASH/ISP variant. No quartz window.
Yes.
> 89SC51 - Same as 89C51, but with some extra power packed features
SC ? Haven't come across that. My faves currently are 89S52/3. Flash ROM which is very handy for development and so well priced that EPROM versions are near extinct.
> My main area of confusion is between 89C51 and 89S51.
Not that much difference AIUI. I've used both types without even thinking about it. Read the datasheet. What info are you looking for ? Graham
Seemanta Dutta wrote:

> Hi, > > I have this basic doubt about the terminology of 8051 variants. > I have read a couple of their data sheets and based on that > here's my understanding, please correct me if I am wrong: > > 8051 - ?? Probably generic name for the entire family, no part named as > such. right?
Not amy more, but there was once. NMOS :)
> 87C51 - EPROM variant. So must have a quartz window.
Some had windows, most made do not. They are called OTP. ( one time program ) The windowed ones are nice to keep, often literally gold plated.
> 89C51 - EEPROM/FLASH/ISP variant. No quartz window.
Older ones are not ISP, most C51's released this century are ISP
> 89SC51 - Same as 89C51, but with some extra power packed features > > My main area of confusion is between 89C51 and 89S51.
'S' is an Atmel (San Jose) tag, for Serial ISP. 'LP' is also ISP, newer 1 cycle core. AT89C51RD2/ED2 are also ISP, but from Atmel's Europe arm, so have a different naming detail. Recent 8051 variants, tend to also have On-Chip debug. (even the tiny ones ) Cygnal were one of the leaders in JTAG Debug, ( now SiLabs ) Now also offered by Ramtron (40 MIPS cores), Winbond ( 10 Mips cores) ST ( 9 MIPS cores ), and Atmel (newest AT89LP releases have OnChipDebug ) -jg
Seemanta Dutta wrote:
> Hi, > > I have this basic doubt about the terminology of 8051 variants. > I have read a couple of their data sheets and based on that > here's my understanding, please correct me if I am wrong: > > 8051 - ?? Probably generic name for the entire family, no part named as > such. right? > 87C51 - EPROM variant. So must have a quartz window. > > 89C51 - EEPROM/FLASH/ISP variant. No quartz window. > > 89SC51 - Same as 89C51, but with some extra power packed features > > My main area of confusion is between 89C51 and 89S51. > > Is my understanding of the above correct? > > Hoping to hear from you soon. > > regards, > Seemanta
It is worse than you think. Many versions of 8XX51 are really 8052 variants. Different manufacturers have different numbering systems.