PRE-Assembled Rabbit Adapter Boards - 1.27mm --> 0.10 ???

Started by B1ackwater March 9, 2009
Aaaaugh !!! 

Teenie-tiny pin schemes may be ok for robots, but
not for human assemblers. 

Rabbits 2mm scheme was bad enough, but now I'm working
with the RCM-3400 which shrank everything down to a
solder-bridge-guarenteed 1.27mm layout. 

Rabbit does sell what it calls an adaptor board ... but
you get a board and some SM sockets YOU have to solder
onto the thing. This doesn't fix the underlying problem ...

So, has anyone run across a manufacturer who makes
PRE-assembled adaptor boards for Rabbit modules ...
ie has 1.27mm sockets already attached and then
expands them to 0.10 pins ordinary Joes can easily
work with ? 


On Mon, 09 Mar 2009 13:58:31 +0000, B1ackwater wrote:

> Aaaaugh !!! > > Teenie-tiny pin schemes may be ok for robots, but not for human > assemblers. > > Rabbits 2mm scheme was bad enough, but now I'm working with the RCM-3400 > which shrank everything down to a solder-bridge-guarenteed 1.27mm > layout. > > Rabbit does sell what it calls an adaptor board ... but you get a board > and some SM sockets YOU have to solder onto the thing. This doesn't fix > the underlying problem ... > > So, has anyone run across a manufacturer who makes PRE-assembled adaptor > boards for Rabbit modules ... ie has 1.27mm sockets already attached and > then expands them to 0.10 pins ordinary Joes can easily work with ?
If they're gull-wing pins then you solder them on by first globbing on solder to make a huge solder bridge, then using solder wick to suck off the excess and leave a nice solder joint on each pin. Works like a charm. Has anyone investigated inexpensive microscope solutions? This job is doable with a sharp naked eye or a loupe, but it's a heck of a lot easier with an assembly microscope. -- http://www.wescottdesign.com
On Mar 9, 12:36=A0pm, Tim Wescott <t...@seemywebsite.com> wrote:

> If they're gull-wing pins then you solder them on by first globbing on > solder to make a huge solder bridge, then using solder wick to suck off > the excess and leave a nice solder joint on each pin.
I used to do it this way, but now I find that I get just as good results - if not better - by tacking down the corners of the part, then putting a metric buttload (must be metric; no inch-pound-foot- acres) of flux on the PCB, and bringing the iron and solder in as close as possible to parallel to the PCB plane and pin direction. Few if any bridges result.
zwsdotcom@gmail.com wrote:
> Tim Wescott <t...@seemywebsite.com> wrote: > >> If they're gull-wing pins then you solder them on by first >> globbing on solder to make a huge solder bridge, then using >> solder wick to suck off the excess and leave a nice solder >> joint on each pin. > > I used to do it this way, but now I find that I get just as good > results - if not better - by tacking down the corners of the part, > then putting a metric buttload (must be metric; no inch-pound- > foot-acres) of flux on the PCB, and bringing the iron and solder > in as close as possible to parallel to the PCB plane and pin > direction. Few if any bridges result.
I believe it is also essential that the mixture used in the flux be specified in MKS units. -- [mail]: Chuck F (cbfalconer at maineline dot net) [page]: <http://cbfalconer.home.att.net> Try the download section.