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turn your expensive oscilloscope into a $5 clock

Started by BrunoG November 2, 2007
On Sat, 03 Nov 2007 16:44:41 -0700, "J.A. Legris"
<jalegris@sympatico.ca> wrote:

>On Nov 2, 11:07 am, "BrunoG" <nore...@micro-examples.com> wrote: >> Hi, >> >> Here is my suggestion to turn your oscilloscope into a clock with a PIC a 4 >> resistors :http://www.micro-examples.com/public/microex-navig/doc/082-pic-oscill... >> >> I'm opened to your destructive comments :) >> >> Bruno > >For you next project, build a device that will accept a string of >characters and convert them to a voltage function of time, as in the >logo for the Plessey Company: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plessey
Here's my company logo, as a vector display and an x-y analog scope: http://img527.imageshack.us/my.php?image=htilogomm7.jpg John
John Larkin wrote:

> On Sat, 03 Nov 2007 16:44:41 -0700, "J.A. Legris" > <jalegris@sympatico.ca> wrote: > > >>On Nov 2, 11:07 am, "BrunoG" <nore...@micro-examples.com> wrote: >> >>>Hi, >>> >>>Here is my suggestion to turn your oscilloscope into a clock with a PIC a 4 >>>resistors :http://www.micro-examples.com/public/microex-navig/doc/082-pic-oscill... >>> >>>I'm opened to your destructive comments :) >>> >>>Bruno >> >>For you next project, build a device that will accept a string of >>characters and convert them to a voltage function of time, as in the >>logo for the Plessey Company: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plessey > > > > > Here's my company logo, as a vector display and an x-y analog scope: > > http://img527.imageshack.us/my.php?image=htilogomm7.jpg > > John >
Hmm, Curious how you got the black out lines around the image? is this a color scope? -- "I'm never wrong, once i thought i was, but was mistaken" Real Programmers Do things like this. http://webpages.charter.net/jamie_5
On Nov 4, 1:28 am, redbelly <redbell...@yahoo.com> wrote:
> On Nov 2, 11:07 am, "BrunoG" <nore...@micro-examples.com> wrote: > > > Hi, > > > Here is my suggestion to turn your oscilloscope into a clock with a PIC a 4 > > resistors :http://www.micro-examples.com/public/microex-navig/doc/082-pic-oscill... > > > I'm opened to your destructive comments :) > > > Bruno > > Neat. > > Could one make the 4th "unused" voltage level something out of range > of the display, so that the extra lines are not visible?
Some scopes have a Z-axis intensity/blanking input which could probably be used for that. Dave.
On 4 nov, 01:01, John Larkin
<jjlar...@highNOTlandTHIStechnologyPART.com> wrote:
> On Sat, 03 Nov 2007 16:44:41 -0700, "J.A. Legris" > > <jaleg...@sympatico.ca> wrote: > >On Nov 2, 11:07 am, "BrunoG" <nore...@micro-examples.com> wrote: > >> Hi, > > >> Here is my suggestion toturnyouroscilloscopeinto a clock with a PIC a 4 > >> resistors :http://www.micro-examples.com/public/microex-navig/doc/082-pic-oscill... > > >> I'm opened toyourdestructive comments :) > > >> Bruno > > >For you next project, build a device that will accept a string of > >characters and convert them to a voltage function of time, as in the > >logo for the Plessey Company: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plessey > > Here's my company logo, as a vector display and an x-y analog scope: > > http://img527.imageshack.us/my.php?image=htilogomm7.jpg > > John
Hi, did you do that with photoshop ;-)???? I can do it with gimp LOL. Anyways,I decided to take your challenge, and played this Sunday afternoon: http://panteltje.com/panteltje/scope_tv/
On 2 nov, 16:07, "BrunoG" <nore...@micro-examples.com> wrote:
> Hi, > > Here is my suggestion toturnyouroscilloscopeinto a clock with a PIC a 4 > resistors :http://www.micro-examples.com/public/microex-navig/doc/082-pic-oscill... > > I'm opened toyourdestructive comments :) > > Bruno
It is clever, but why not go TV? I could make a movie of my digital clock..... http://panteltje.com/panteltje/scope_tv/

BrunoG wrote:
> Hi, > > Here is my suggestion to turn your oscilloscope into a clock with a PIC a 4 > resistors : > http://www.micro-examples.com/public/microex-navig/doc/082-pic-oscillo-clock > > I'm opened to your destructive comments :) >
There is one thing that I didn't understand: are you guys have terribly nothing to do? If you show a TV picture using an oscilloscope, could it be a way around the TV tax in some countries? Vladimir Vassilevsky DSP and Mixed Signal Design Consultant http://www.abvolt.com
Vladimir Vassilevsky wrote:

>There is one thing that I didn't understand: are you guys have terribly >nothing to do?
Have you never created designs just for the joy of doing so?
>If you show a TV picture using an oscilloscope, could it be a way around >the TV tax in some countries?
I suspect it is the signal received that is taxed rather than the receiver. -- ======================================================================== Michael Kesti | "And like, one and one don't make | two, one and one make one." mrkesti at hotmail dot com | - The Who, Bargain
On Nov 3, 2:07 am, "BrunoG" <nore...@micro-examples.com> wrote:
> Hi, > > Here is my suggestion to turn your oscilloscope into a clock with a PIC a 4 > resistors :http://www.micro-examples.com/public/microex-navig/doc/082-pic-oscill... > > I'm opened to your destructive comments :) > > Bruno
The entire image needs to move slowly around on the screen randomly to prevent screen burn-in. Dave.
On Nov 3, 4:07 am, "BrunoG" <nore...@micro-examples.com> wrote:
> Hi, > > Here is my suggestion to turn your oscilloscope into a clock with a PIC a 4 > resistors :http://www.micro-examples.com/public/microex-navig/doc/082-pic-oscill... > > I'm opened to your destructive comments :) > > Bruno
Can you go the other way and turn a $5 clock into a scope! Hardy
On Sun, 04 Nov 2007 19:28:33 +0000, Vladimir Vassilevsky wrote:

> If you show a TV picture using an oscilloscope, could it be a way around > the TV tax in some countries?
Nope; at least, not in the UK. If you receive a TV broadcast (whether by radio, cable, internet[1], etc), you are required to pay the licence fee. If you have a normal TV set, but only ever use it for watching DVDs (or as a monitor for CCTV or an old home microcomputer), you don't need a licence. OTOH, if you record broadcasts with a VCR, but don't actually have a TV, you still need a licence. [1] Internet downloads or video-on-demand streams don't require a licence, only broadcasts. The distinction is whether the viewers all watch concurrently, so a a streaming service where each viewer's stream starts when that viewer connects isn't a broadcast.