The best way to solder an ARM processor

Started by roccogalati December 4, 2010
Hi to all!

I have to connect the ARM processor's pins to my circuit in order to interface it with UART and some sensors.

If needed, the ARM datasheet is: http://docs-europe.origin.electrocomponents.com/webdocs/0db0/0900766b80db0f69.pdf

It is possible to buy a socket where I can plug my ARM processor or I have to solder it directly in the circuit?

I've never soldering a smd device, so I'd like to receive some advices.
I've already bought the fluxant agent and some very thin tips.

I'd like to realize a solution which can let me unplug the ARM in the future in order to use it in some other circuit, if possible.

Thanks a lot for your advices! :)

An Engineer's Guide to the LPC2100 Series

On 04/12/2010 18:39, roccogalati wrote:
> Hi to all!
>
> I have to connect the ARM processor's pins to my circuit in order to interface it with UART and some sensors.
>
> If needed, the ARM datasheet is: http://docs-europe.origin.electrocomponents.com/webdocs/0db0/0900766b80db0f69.pdf
>
> It is possible to buy a socket where I can plug my ARM processor or I have to solder it directly in the circuit?
>
> I've never soldering a smd device, so I'd like to receive some advices.
> I've already bought the fluxant agent and some very thin tips.
>
> I'd like to realize a solution which can let me unplug the ARM in the future in order to use it in some other circuit, if possible.

Sockets are made, but they are *very* expensive.

I solder a pair of opposite corners and then drag-solder each row of
leads using a Metcal system with a mini-hoof cartridge, with plenty of flux.

Leon
--
Leon Heller
G1HSM
--- In l..., Leon Heller wrote:
>

> Sockets are made, but they are *very* expensive.
>
> I solder a pair of opposite corners and then drag-solder each row of
> leads using a Metcal system with a mini-hoof cartridge, with plenty of flux.
>
> Leon

Yes, exactly this... I routinely do 100+ pin 0.5mm parts this way. As Leon said, *flux is your friend*. Be sure to clean well afterward, as well.

Also as Leon said, make sure to secure a few points (2-4 of the corners), and REALLY take the time to get the pins aligned on the pads. Don't get sloppy, don't rush, line things up very well the first time & you'll be glad you did.

There are tons of videos on the internet (especially YouTube) on this... here's just one of many: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wQXhny3R7lk#tXs

Good luck & have fun.

-Dan

P.S. It helps if you can practice on some old boards/parts first. Also practice on larger pitch parts first, before trying small (0.5mm) pitch. Also you'll want a good magnifying glass / loupe (10x) to inspect your work.

This is one of those times where buy is better then build.

It is a good feeling to know that you can build a circuit and see it work.

But with 100-pin tqfp parts, (and no experience) how many times may you screw it up before you know everything is working.

By the sounds of your needs, a pre-built board that is known working is better.

Prototyping has changed, but getting a application running is your goal, not showing off your soldering.

After you get your application working, then look at getting a board built.

hamilton

--- In l..., "roccogalati" wrote:
>
> Hi to all!
>
> I have to connect the ARM processor's pins to my circuit in order to interface it with UART and some sensors.
>
> If needed, the ARM datasheet is: http://docs-europe.origin.electrocomponents.com/webdocs/0db0/0900766b80db0f69.pdf
>
> It is possible to buy a socket where I can plug my ARM processor or I have to solder it directly in the circuit?
>
> I've never soldering a smd device, so I'd like to receive some advices.
> I've already bought the fluxant agent and some very thin tips.
>
> I'd like to realize a solution which can let me unplug the ARM in the future in order to use it in some other circuit, if possible.
>
> Thanks a lot for your advices! :)
>

Check out this board a little more then $10 and it works out of the box:

http://www.st.com/internet/evalboard/product/250863.jsp

http://in.mouser.com/ProductDetail/STMicroelectronics/STM32VLDISCOVERY/?qs=Sq9754QpLBjqJpXVpJuUgA%3d%3d
--- In l..., "Donald H" wrote:
>
> This is one of those times where buy is better then build.
>
> It is a good feeling to know that you can build a circuit and see it work.
>
> But with 100-pin tqfp parts, (and no experience) how many times may you screw it up before you know everything is working.
>
> By the sounds of your needs, a pre-built board that is known working is better.
>
> Prototyping has changed, but getting a application running is your goal, not showing off your soldering.
>
> After you get your application working, then look at getting a board built.
>
> hamilton
>
> --- In l..., "roccogalati" wrote:
> >
> > Hi to all!
> >
> > I have to connect the ARM processor's pins to my circuit in order to interface it with UART and some sensors.
> >
> > If needed, the ARM datasheet is: http://docs-europe.origin.electrocomponents.com/webdocs/0db0/0900766b80db0f69.pdf
> >
> > It is possible to buy a socket where I can plug my ARM processor or I have to solder it directly in the circuit?
> >
> > I've never soldering a smd device, so I'd like to receive some advices.
> > I've already bought the fluxant agent and some very thin tips.
> >
> > I'd like to realize a solution which can let me unplug the ARM in the future in order to use it in some other circuit, if possible.
> >
> > Thanks a lot for your advices! :)
>

--- In l..., "roccogalati" wrote:
>
> Hi to all!
>
> I have to connect the ARM processor's pins to my circuit in order to interface it with UART and some sensors.
>
> If needed, the ARM datasheet is: http://docs-europe.origin.electrocomponents.com/webdocs/0db0/0900766b80db0f69.pdf
>
> It is possible to buy a socket where I can plug my ARM processor or I have to solder it directly in the circuit?
>
> I've never soldering a smd device, so I'd like to receive some advices.
> I've already bought the fluxant agent and some very thin tips.
>
> I'd like to realize a solution which can let me unplug the ARM in the future in order to use it in some other circuit, if possible.
>
> Thanks a lot for your advices! :)
>
I don't think you are going to succeed with unplugging unless you first solder your device to a header like:

http://www.schmartboard.com/index.asp?page=products_qfp&idh

This is workable but is seldom optimal and all you save is the cost of the device.

I am beginning to prefer the hot plate approach to soldering SMDs slthough drag soldering certainly works. Just be sure to have plenty of SolderWick around to clean up the solder bridges:

http://www.hmcelectronics.com/cgi-bin/scripts/query.cgi?query=soder-wick&gclid=CPHik82y06UCFQYHbAodICT6mQ

I use 0.025" and 0.050"

Solder flux is NC-559-V2 for drag soldering and paste solder for hotplate soldering has the same part number (I don't know why!):

http://www.howardelectronics.com/navigate/amtech.html

There are some videos on the Howard Electronics site that are useful.

FWIW, I use the Yellow syringe needles for dispensing both flux and solder paste.

I prefer the hotplate method simply because parts 'jump' into alignment with the pads.

You can remove chips with a hot air gun and an appropriate tip. I wouldn't bother.

You can also use Chip Quik to remove chips:

http://www.chipquikinc.com/

It alters the solder composition such that it melts 200 deg F. and it stays molten for a longer period of time. See:

http://www.chipquikinc.com/newsletters/cq_new_june_2004.htm

Richard

Thanks for your advice, but I prefer to build a circuit and I can't
use a pre-build board.

I've bought a JTAG adapter (USB + COM) and I'd like to connect the ARM
pin's with the adapter pins out. Moreover, I'd like to connect some
sensors to my ARM and read their values so I have to connect also the
other pins and not just the UART interface ones.

It is not a problem for me to learn and improve my soldering skills; I
just want to be able to solder the ARM in the right way and with a
correct support or socket.
At the moment, I don't know how to build the socket or how to realize
the connection pads where to solder the ARM pins.

:-(

Il giorno 04/dic/10, alle ore 21:05, Donald H ha scritto:

> This is one of those times where buy is better then build.
>
> It is a good feeling to know that you can build a circuit and see it
> work.
>
> But with 100-pin tqfp parts, (and no experience) how many times may
> you screw it up before you know everything is working.
>
> By the sounds of your needs, a pre-built board that is known working
> is better.
>
> Prototyping has changed, but getting a application running is your
> goal, not showing off your soldering.
>
> After you get your application working, then look at getting a board
> built.
>
> hamilton
>
> --- In l..., "roccogalati" wrote:
> >
> > Hi to all!
> >
> > I have to connect the ARM processor's pins to my circuit in order
> to interface it with UART and some sensors.
> >
> > If needed, the ARM datasheet is: http://docs-europe.origin.electrocomponents.com/webdocs/0db0/0900766b80db0f69.pdf
> >
> > It is possible to buy a socket where I can plug my ARM processor
> or I have to solder it directly in the circuit?
> >
> > I've never soldering a smd device, so I'd like to receive some
> advices.
> > I've already bought the fluxant agent and some very thin tips.
> >
> > I'd like to realize a solution which can let me unplug the ARM in
> the future in order to use it in some other circuit, if possible.
> >
> > Thanks a lot for your advices! :)
>

--

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Clicca qui: http://adv.email.it/cgi-bin/foclick.cgi?mid029&d=4-12
For example,
do you think that this:
http://cgi.ebay.it/SMD-CONVERTER-ADAPTER-PCB-TQFP100-Convert-4X26-PIN-/270618989308?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item3f022612fc

can be useful for my goal?
Il giorno 04/dic/10, alle ore 21:14, Donald H ha scritto:

>
> Check out this board a little more then $10 and it works out of the
> box:
>
> http://www.st.com/internet/evalboard/product/250863.jsp
>
> http://in.mouser.com/ProductDetail/STMicroelectronics/STM32VLDISCOVERY/?qs=Sq9754QpLBjqJpXVpJuUgA%3d%3d
>
> --- In l..., "Donald H"
> wrote:
> >
> > This is one of those times where buy is better then build.
> >
> > It is a good feeling to know that you can build a circuit and see
> it work.
> >
> > But with 100-pin tqfp parts, (and no experience) how many times
> may you screw it up before you know everything is working.
> >
> > By the sounds of your needs, a pre-built board that is known
> working is better.
> >
> > Prototyping has changed, but getting a application running is your
> goal, not showing off your soldering.
> >
> > After you get your application working, then look at getting a
> board built.
> >
> > hamilton
> >
> > --- In l..., "roccogalati" wrote:
> > >
> > > Hi to all!
> > >
> > > I have to connect the ARM processor's pins to my circuit in
> order to interface it with UART and some sensors.
> > >
> > > If needed, the ARM datasheet is: http://docs-europe.origin.electrocomponents.com/webdocs/0db0/0900766b80db0f69.pdf
> > >
> > > It is possible to buy a socket where I can plug my ARM processor
> or I have to solder it directly in the circuit?
> > >
> > > I've never soldering a smd device, so I'd like to receive some
> advices.
> > > I've already bought the fluxant agent and some very thin tips.
> > >
> > > I'd like to realize a solution which can let me unplug the ARM
> in the future in order to use it in some other circuit, if possible.
> > >
> > > Thanks a lot for your advices! :)
> > >
>

--

Caselle da 1GB, trasmetti allegati fino a 3GB e in piu' IMAP, POP3 e SMTP autenticato? GRATIS solo con Email.it http://www.email.it/f

Sponsor:

Prova subito Emailpaghe, e' in prova gratuita sino al 31 dicembre 2010 e in pochi clik fai paghe e stipendi per la tua azienda!

Clicca qui: http://adv.email.it/cgi-bin/foclick.cgi?mid683&d=4-12
This is is very similar to the first link you suggested me:

http://cgi.ebay.it/SMD-CONVERTER-ADAPTER-PCB-TQFP100-Convert-4X26-PIN-/270618989308?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item3f022612fc

I've seen the video on youtube which was linked on that page and I see
that it seems really easy to solder it.
The guy in the video use at first the fluxant and than the soldering.

Do you think there is a board like this which implements already a
JTAG adpter so I just have to solder the ARM on it and plug it via USB
to my pc?
In this way, I'll avoid to make some failure with the UART interface.
Il giorno 04/dic/10, alle ore 21:17, rtstofer ha scritto:

> --- In l..., "roccogalati" wrote:
> >
> > Hi to all!
> >
> > I have to connect the ARM processor's pins to my circuit in order
> to interface it with UART and some sensors.
> >
> > If needed, the ARM datasheet is: http://docs-europe.origin.electrocomponents.com/webdocs/0db0/0900766b80db0f69.pdf
> >
> > It is possible to buy a socket where I can plug my ARM processor
> or I have to solder it directly in the circuit?
> >
> > I've never soldering a smd device, so I'd like to receive some
> advices.
> > I've already bought the fluxant agent and some very thin tips.
> >
> > I'd like to realize a solution which can let me unplug the ARM in
> the future in order to use it in some other circuit, if possible.
> >
> > Thanks a lot for your advices! :)
> > I don't think you are going to succeed with unplugging unless you
> first solder your device to a header like:
>
> http://www.schmartboard.com/index.asp?page=products_qfp&idh
>
> This is workable but is seldom optimal and all you save is the cost
> of the device.
>
> I am beginning to prefer the hot plate approach to soldering SMDs
> slthough drag soldering certainly works. Just be sure to have plenty
> of SolderWick around to clean up the solder bridges:
>
> http://www.hmcelectronics.com/cgi-bin/scripts/query.cgi?query=soder-wick&gclid=CPHik82y06UCFQYHbAodICT6mQ
>
> I use 0.025" and 0.050"
>
> Solder flux is NC-559-V2 for drag soldering and paste solder for
> hotplate soldering has the same part number (I don't know why!):
>
> http://www.howardelectronics.com/navigate/amtech.html
>
> There are some videos on the Howard Electronics site that are useful.
>
> FWIW, I use the Yellow syringe needles for dispensing both flux and
> solder paste.
>
> I prefer the hotplate method simply because parts 'jump' into
> alignment with the pads.
>
> You can remove chips with a hot air gun and an appropriate tip. I
> wouldn't bother.
>
> You can also use Chip Quik to remove chips:
>
> http://www.chipquikinc.com/
>
> It alters the solder composition such that it melts 200 deg F. and
> it stays molten for a longer period of time. See:
>
> http://www.chipquikinc.com/newsletters/cq_new_june_2004.htm
>
> Richard
>
Here's some incentive -- I predict that your chances of getting your
hardware to work is ZERO.

DaveS

On Sat, Dec 4, 2010 at 12:48 PM, Rocco Galati wrote:

> Thanks for your advice, but I prefer to build a circuit and I can't use a
> pre-build board.
>
> I've bought a JTAG adapter (USB + COM) and I'd like to connect the ARM
> pin's with the adapter pins out. Moreover, I'd like to connect some sensors
> to my ARM and read their values so I have to connect also the other pins and
> not just the UART interface ones.
>
> It is not a problem for me to learn and improve my soldering skills; I just
> want to be able to solder the ARM in the right way and with a correct
> support or socket.
> At the moment, I don't know how to build the socket or how to realize the
> connection pads where to solder the ARM pins.
>
> :-(
>
> Il giorno 04/dic/10, alle ore 21:05, Donald H ha scritto:
>
> This is one of those times where buy is better then build.
>
> It is a good feeling to know that you can build a circuit and see it work.
>
> But with 100-pin tqfp parts, (and no experience) how many times may you
> screw it up before you know everything is working.
>
> By the sounds of your needs, a pre-built board that is known working is
> better.
>
> Prototyping has changed, but getting a application running is your goal,
> not showing off your soldering.
>
> After you get your application working, then look at getting a board built.
>
> hamilton
>
> --- In l... , "roccogalati"
> wrote:
> >
> > Hi to all!
> >
> > I have to connect the ARM processor's pins to my circuit in order to
> interface it with UART and some sensors.
> >
> > If needed, the ARM datasheet is:
> http://docs-europe.origin.electrocomponents.com/webdocs/0db0/0900766b80db0f69.pdf
> >
> > It is possible to buy a socket where I can plug my ARM processor or I
> have to solder it directly in the circuit?
> >
> > I've never soldering a smd device, so I'd like to receive some advices.
> > I've already bought the fluxant agent and some very thin tips.
> >
> > I'd like to realize a solution which can let me unplug the ARM in the
> future in order to use it in some other circuit, if possible.
> >
> > Thanks a lot for your advices! :)
> > ----
> Caselle da 1GB, trasmetti allegati fino a 3GB e in piu' IMAP, POP3 e SMTP
> autenticato? GRATIS solo con Email.it Sponsor:
> Stampa le tue foto su tela e crea i tuoi quadri personalizzati. In
> promozione esclusiva da soli euro 15.90!
> Clicca qui
>