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Memfault State of IoT Report

Working with Microchip PIC 8-bit GPIO

Luther Stanton April 24, 20241 comment

The third in a series of five posts looks at GPIO with PIC 8-bit microcontrollers. After a detailed review of the registers for configuring and managing GPIO on the PIC18F47Q10 processor, a basic application is stood up programming those registers to blink external LEDs at 0.5Hz.


Getting Started with the Microchip PIC® Microcontroller

Luther Stanton March 11, 2024

This first post of a five part series looks at the available hardware options for getting started with Microchip 8-bit PIC® Microcontroller, explores the MPLAB® X Integrated Development Environment and walks through setting up a project to expose the configured clock to an external pin and implement a single output GPIO to light an LED.


Trust, but Verify: Examining the Output of an Embedded Compiler

Jason Sachs September 27, 2015

I work with motor control firmware on the Microchip dsPIC33 series of microcontrollers. The vast majority of that firmware is written in C, with only a few percent in assembly. And I got to thinking recently: I programmed in C and C++ on an Intel PC from roughly 1991 to 2009. But I don’t remember ever working with x86 assembly code. Not once. Not even reading it. Which seems odd. I do that all the time with embedded firmware. And I think you should too. Before I say why, here are...


Deeply embedded design example - Logic replacement

Gene Breniman July 9, 2011

I have always believed that some of the low-cost, low-pin count, low-resource microprocessors would make an excellent choice for the replacement of discrete logic components.  In these cases the deeply embedded microprocessor would become less of a general purpose computer and more of a logic replacement, providing a prescribed function with no connection to the outside world.  In a world of bigger, faster and more expensive, it is a pleasant change of pace...


Trust, but Verify: Examining the Output of an Embedded Compiler

Jason Sachs September 27, 2015

I work with motor control firmware on the Microchip dsPIC33 series of microcontrollers. The vast majority of that firmware is written in C, with only a few percent in assembly. And I got to thinking recently: I programmed in C and C++ on an Intel PC from roughly 1991 to 2009. But I don’t remember ever working with x86 assembly code. Not once. Not even reading it. Which seems odd. I do that all the time with embedded firmware. And I think you should too. Before I say why, here are...


Deeply embedded design example - Logic replacement

Gene Breniman July 9, 2011

I have always believed that some of the low-cost, low-pin count, low-resource microprocessors would make an excellent choice for the replacement of discrete logic components.  In these cases the deeply embedded microprocessor would become less of a general purpose computer and more of a logic replacement, providing a prescribed function with no connection to the outside world.  In a world of bigger, faster and more expensive, it is a pleasant change of pace...


Getting Started with the Microchip PIC® Microcontroller

Luther Stanton March 11, 2024

This first post of a five part series looks at the available hardware options for getting started with Microchip 8-bit PIC® Microcontroller, explores the MPLAB® X Integrated Development Environment and walks through setting up a project to expose the configured clock to an external pin and implement a single output GPIO to light an LED.


Working with Microchip PIC 8-bit GPIO

Luther Stanton April 24, 20241 comment

The third in a series of five posts looks at GPIO with PIC 8-bit microcontrollers. After a detailed review of the registers for configuring and managing GPIO on the PIC18F47Q10 processor, a basic application is stood up programming those registers to blink external LEDs at 0.5Hz.


Memfault State of IoT Report